Mastermind how to think like sherlock holmes ebook

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Mastermind How To Think Like Sherlock Holmes. Topics Mastermind Great Book. IdentifierMastermindHowToThinkLikeSherlockHolmes. Editorial Reviews. Review. "Entertaining blend of Holmesiana and modern-day neuroscience." (The New York Times). "Ingenious thoughtful covers a wide. This content was uploaded by our users and we assume good faith they have the permission to share this book. If you own the copyright to this book and it is.

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Mastermind How To Think Like Sherlock Holmes Ebook

Published in Great Britain in by Canongate Books Ltd, 14 High Street, Edinburgh EH1 1TE medical-site.info This digital edition first published in by. The New York Times bestselling guide to thinking like literature's greatest detective. "Steven Pinker meets Sir Arthur Conan Doyle" (Boston. Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes (English Edition) eBook Kindle . Drawing on twenty-first-century neuroscience and psychology, Mastermind.

Ze studeerde cum laude af aan Harvard University en wordt gezien als een 'rising star' in de psychologie. Denken als Sherlock Holmeswas haar debuut. Op bol. What makes Holmes such a superior detective, able to piece together clues and solve problems that seem elementary to Watson only in hindsight? And can we - most of us Watsons ourselves - ever harness a bit of Holmes's extraordinary powers of mind, not to solve crimes, but simply to improve our lives at work and home? The answer is yes, and in Mastermind, psychologist Maria Konnikova shows us how. Using plots and passages from the wonderfully entertaining Holmes stories, she illuminates how Arthur Conan Doyle's detective embodies an ever-present mindfulness, and how this active mental disposition proves foundational to his success. Beginning with Holmes's concept of the 'brain attic' - a metaphor for the information we choose to store in the mind and how we organise our knowledge, Konnikova unpacks the mental strategies that lead to clearer thinking and deeper insights. Moving through principles of logic and deduction, creativity and imagination, Mastermind puts 21st century neuroscience and psychology in service of understanding Holmes's methods. With some self-awareness and a little practice, we can all employ these methods to develop better strategies, solve difficult problems and enhance our creative powers.

I imagine a thousand My Little Ponies, each a different color, with fabulous manes and tails, hearts and stars, slowly dying and falling to the ground, and tiny little gnomes taking striped bats and hitting them, even after they are dead reads the exact same paragraph as above that she read before, word for word, from Sherlock Holmes.

That said, sometimes people do that. They happen to beat dead horses.

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Now that phrase is not to be taken literally, but figuratively. When people do that, they tend to over explain or repeat themselves over and over and over again. Did I mention that this happens more than once? It happens over and over. This is called. That stands for beating a dead horse reads the exact same paragraph as above that she read before, word for word, from Sherlock Holmes.

Now let's look at some studies where more people tell you how to beat a dead horse. Then I'll tell you again after the study how to beat a dead horse. As usual, I received this book for nothing from a GoodReads giveaway but despite that kindness I give it my candid opinion below.

Our author's submission is one of those that tries to be two things at once, cross-selling you on a bit of neuroscience in the context of Sherlock Holmes as favorite fictional genius. The basic format boils down to something like this: Assuming the reader is a fan of Holmes, it's a fairly good gateway to the headier topics of Neuroscience and Psychology. Personally, I found the whole thing rather cloying. I've read a dozen books on this topic so the slow and easy introduction to the science was rather annoying and ponderous.

I found myself skimming over the quotes and introductory banter to find the real meat of what she was trying to get at. So in summary, a good introduction to the topic if you're a fan of Holmes. If you're past the introductory stage though, best to look elsewhere. There really is a lot of noise and at the end of it the material covered is done more incisively in other popular works on the topic.

Feb 19, Sadaf rated it really liked it. As a psychology student, I am familiar with many of the studies that the author has mentioned to support her explanations. But, I like how she puts it across in a manner that layman could easily understand. What makes it different from mainstream psychology books, is that she takes sherlock holmes stories to explain how he trained his brain to think, and gives examples from his words and actions. She also delves into real life incidents in the criminal world at the time when Sherlock holmes was As a psychology student, I am familiar with many of the studies that the author has mentioned to support her explanations.

She also delves into real life incidents in the criminal world at the time when Sherlock holmes was published, many these are incidents in which Arthur Conan Doyle was personally involved.

She explains the methods of the mind with good evidence and studies. For the slightly impatient readers, the book can get repetitive in certain places. But i acknowledge that if she doesn't repeat it, important conclusions of all the chapters might leave the mind.

Overall it is a hopeful and helpful book, and urges the readers to invest in training their mind, and they will surely get a Holmes-like mind if they do so diligently.

So the title is misleading. This book was reviewed by Scott Huler and the review can be heard starting at timestamp May 22, Akib Ahmed rated it it was amazing Shelves: A book that deserves a reread twice in my case. The writer gave emphasis on two Ms: Mindfulness and Motivation, but described Sherlock Holmes as much more than that.

The level of isolation he provided his thoughts with was so extraordinary that resulted in him accurately deducing each case. This book deserves reread not because it's about Sherlock Holmes, instead, this book gives me methods to think elementarily. Apr 08, Crystal Starr Light rated it liked it Shelves: Sherlock Holmes is the epitome of the mystery genre and the private detective.

He uses his senses, his expansive knowledge, and his cunning skill to seek out the truth behind the crimes that come to his door. But what goes on in Sherlock Holmes mind?

How does he think? And can we get anywhere near the skill of the Master Detective? While I like Sherlock Holmes well enough, reading two books and a couple movies based on the stories is not enough to call me a fan. The primary reason I read this boo Sherlock Holmes is the epitome of the mystery genre and the private detective.

The primary reason I read this book was for my book club. And honestly, it did sound intriguing - COULD I learn to think like Sherlock Holmes, to see every detail in my surroundings and process it efficiently? I honestly think that people who will adore this book will come in two flavors: This wasn't a bad book.

There were some really interesting psychological concepts. Unfortunately, I already read a book that discussed almost every single one with nearly the same exact examples, called You Are Not So Smart.

Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes

And the latter book, I found to be much better - mostly because it didn't say in the title it would help you to think like Sherlock Holmes and then fail to tell you how to think like Sherlock Holmes unless the last chapter of steps, using "The Hound of the Baskervilles" was supposed to be the "How To" portion.

I guess that one thing is what trips me up the most about this book, what sent this book from "Okay, but really nothing special" to "frustratingly befuddling". If the title had merely been changed to "Mastermind: But this book told me that I would be able to think like Sherlock Holmes, that I should have things to practice to be able to think like Sherlock Holmes. At the end of this book, the only real useful piece of information I took away was: Maybe it's a first step, but I have no idea where to go from there.

I did think that perhaps that was the book's objective - like Holmes, we were to pay attention, gather clues from the book, and assemble our own steps or "solve the crime". If that was the job, then kudos to the author for the clever execution, but that doesn't solve how lost and frustrated I felt.

For a book that is only pages long, there is an awful lot of repetition. Some sections - such as when things are divided into lists - go on for so long, I forgot what list the item was a part of. Concepts were repeated over and over, with slight word changes. Tons of Holmes stories were included as well, but none of them were ever finished.

I guess I can understand not wanting to spoil the mystery, but it left me confused. Also, I started mixing up all the various stories and forgetting which one showed what concept. And then there are absolutely no notes.

No notes, no bibliography, no intext citation, nada. At the end of the chapter, there is a Further Reading section that can send you either to a Sherlock Holmes story or one of I guess the sources Konnikova used. As for where she got the research and studies - absolutely nothing. Not what I like to see in a non-fiction book.

The one other point I really want to bring up is this: Sherlock Holmes may have been based on real characters Doyle and Bell , but he is still fictional. The world he lives in is fictional. So it's exceptionally easy for him to always be attentive and soak up every detail and make the right assumptions based on stereotypes or "common knowledge" of the time, but that doesn't necessarily translate to a real world environment. I'm not saying this entire book was pointless - oh, well, Holmes is fiction, therefore, his thought-process is fiction.

I'm saying it's as if I wrote a book about how to meditate like Yoda or Luke Skywalker. Those two are fictional characters in a fictional universe that meditate in a fictional Force.

While there would be attributes of the meditation process you could adapt, there still would be fictional parts. I know this seems like a terrible, scathing review, but that wasn't my point in writing it. This certainly wasn't a terrible book; I just wasn't the person that this book would be best suited for. If you are unfamiliar with confirmation bias or omission neglect, love Sherlock Holmes, and don't expect a list of steps followed by practice exercises, this is your book.

Otherwise, you may want to check it out from the library before plunking down hard-earned cash for this. Jun 03, ArwendeLuhtiene rated it it was amazing Shelves: I found this book engaging, interesting and useful, both as a Sherlock Holmes fan and as someone who is interested in self-help books about self-awareness and how to hone our critical thinking and problem-solving strategies in our everyday life. She cites, for example, the study showing that women per I found this book engaging, interesting and useful, both as a Sherlock Holmes fan and as someone who is interested in self-help books about self-awareness and how to hone our critical thinking and problem-solving strategies in our everyday life.

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She cites, for example, the study showing that women perform worse in math-related tests when they were asked to write down their gender because of the 'stereotype threat' of women being 'naturally' worse at science and math.

Using 'he' as an impersonal or 'man' to refer to the whole human race is a sexist use of language that promotes the invisibility of women. I also found this particularly grating given that we're talking about a female writer in this case: Jan 22, Jim Razinha rated it it was amazing. Wonderful survey of thought processes and cognitive theories woven within a framework of how the characters Sherlock Holmes and John Watson might approach problem solving. I hope Ms. Konnikova continues to write, because she has a talent like Sagan for making science accessible.

I found it less "how to" than the title suggests, rather "here are possibilities why you might think a certain way". I am particularly interested in the additional reading suggestions And she picked at my own bias against meditation, which she offers as an excellent focusing mechanism; I'll have to investigate further if I think I might be able to take advantage of it.

For those expecting an academic treatise, look elsewhere For me, this was an enjoyable read that sparked follow on reading and thinking. Feb 10, Mary rated it it was ok Shelves: This book is like a good first draft. I would love to get in there and get the material organized in a concise readable format and get the scientific references cited properly so that it could be a good book.

She talks around it and expects you to connect the dots yourself. Fourth, there are holes in her discourse. For greatest recall, you need to store information under the right heading or category based on how you will likely want to retrieve that info. And that run on sentence was a warmup for the book text. Fifth, the information is not organized and presented well.

The headings are all but useless, there is no clear point to many sections of writing, and no formatting that might put her ramblings into easy-to-skim points so that you can use it as an aid to improve your skills.

I truly would like to see an author write on this topic and do it justice. But this one failed. A fascinating book. It was interesting, yes. I enjoyed the snippets and discussion of many different Holmes cases. Contained many fancy psychological terms and applications. I found a few gems of great advice, which I intend to put to good use! An interesting read, if nothing else. For me this was a three-star read but it will easily warrant a higher rating from someone with a more developed interest in the subject matter.

I started with gusto but at about the halfway point my interest started to wane and the last half was a struggle.

To the author's credit, I can't imagine any less talented writer would have been able to actively engage me that far and certainly not kept me involved enough to actually finish. The irony in my struggle to pay attention was that ultimately, For me this was a three-star read but it will easily warrant a higher rating from someone with a more developed interest in the subject matter.

Mastermind: How to Think Like Sherlock Holmes by Maria Konnikova

The irony in my struggle to pay attention was that ultimately, this book was all about paying attention. Konnikova teaches readers to engage and focus on a singular task, eliminate distractions, and rule out snap, perception-based decisions. As if that weren't difficult enough, all that should be accomplished while staying mindfully aware of the present.

She uses the adventures of Sherlock Holmes as a basis for her teachings showing how the super sleuth mastered his mind to solve crimes while his counterpart often made incorrect conclusions based on perceptions and opinions born of limited experience.

Meditation is an important part of my daily routine and a great deal of Konnikova's teachings mirrored the lessons I have received from various meditation teachers. Although meditation isn't mentioned until page , anyone with meditation experience will pick up on that underlying theme from the beginning. This book again confirmed for me the value and importance of my meditation practice. Konnikova summarizes the process of our ability to recall information by tying the learning process to mindful thinking about the subject.

Interest and motivation in and toward a subject lead to engaged mindful thinking resulting in improved memory recall. She also notes that we are not actually meant to multitask and will learn and remember much more effectively by focusing on one thing at a time. She counsels several times throughout the book that choosing to do nothing is still a choice, a good reminder for me as I have a tendency to procrastinate action items.

I have been focusing on cultivating a beginner's mind in all aspects of my life. Zen teacher, Shunryu Suzuki, put a point on this concept when he said, "In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities, in the expert's mind there are few. Mar 10, Sarah rated it liked it.

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This nonfiction work tackles the inner functioning and the elements behind the mind of the most well-known detective in literary fiction. The first and most important step is to become mindful, which is easier said than done in the modern era of multitasking.

In order to achieve this, Konnikova notes that we must improve our natural attentional abilities by being selective, objective, inclusive, and engaged. We must also always consider every scenario and all evidence, no matter how improbably it may seem because, as Holmes repeatedly admonishes, the improbably is not necessarily impossible. As is evident from the fact that it began as a series of scientific articles, this is not a light read by any means.

It reads much like a textbook and offers somewhat excessive preliminaries. The concepts presented are not revelatory, being based mostly on common sense and the art of mindfulness, but the extensive research and background material—including notes for further reading after each chapter and a cumulative index—make for an interesting venture.

If it were possible given the current rating system, I would give this book 3. Jan 06, Jeanne rated it liked it. Not what I expected. This book is one third anecdotal observations about using the powers of deduction in everyday life.

That was very interesting. One third examples from Sherlock Holmes mysteries, kind of interesting but very chopped up and you never get the entire story. And one third part of some psychology thesis, not interesting at all. Plus the author treats Holmes as if he is not a fictional character but an actual detective from history and as if Conan Doyle did not manipulate both the Not what I expected.

Plus the author treats Holmes as if he is not a fictional character but an actual detective from history and as if Conan Doyle did not manipulate both the manuscript and the readers to be fascinated by Holmes' powers of deduction.

Jan 13, Quinn rated it did not like it. Chances are, the majority of us are also familiar with the idea that we can change our emotional state. But did you know that you can also improve your brain? We were left to our own devices, to rise and fall as our innate abilities led. Then we run into Sherlock Holmes. Also, the driver behind me was impatient. We seem to be approaching a steel structure of some sort.

Water may be present…. She begins with the idea that we must pay attention. Really pay attention, in a directed way. We need to define our problem, specifically. Then we need to observe—to gather information, as well as use what we have already stored up in our brain attics—in a systematic, thorough fashion, working to avoid biases, shortcuts, and other pitfalls of lazy thinking. Finally, we test our ideas against the facts—and only the facts—to see which stand, which fall, and which, however improbable, must be the truth.

Just as Ms.