You place yourself on the line when you tell people what they need to hear Indeed, the single most common source of leadership failure we've been able to. Leadership on the Line: Staying Alive through the Dangers of Leading is about Leadership on the Line is a significant book that grows your leadership depth. Editorial Reviews. medical-site.info Review. Climbing Mount Everest: dangerous. Hitchhiking in.

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Leadership On The Line Pdf

Leadership on the Line: Staying Alive through the Dangers of Leading [Martin Linsky, Ronald A. Heifetz] on medical-site.info *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Powerpoint presentation based on the book Leadership on the Line by Marty Linsky and Leadership On The Line Staying Alive Through the Dangers of Leading. Leadership on the line by ronald a. heifetz ebook pdf. Notes taken from the book authored by Ronald Heifetz and Martin Linskey. Heifetz, R., & Linsky, M. (). Leadership on the line: Staying.

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And one day someone taps me on the shoulder and says 'football. I'm not 6'4" and I don't weigh pounds. So, I looked into the mirror and said, 'Schlemiel, nobody wants to watch baseball.

Make the transformation to football.

Leadership on the Line: Staying Alive Through The Dangers of Leading

He committed himself to a personal as well as a corporate makeover. He hired an executive coach to help him learn new ways and to stay on track.

People in the company as well as shareholders and lenders noticed. They saw the changes he was making and began to understand that he was on their side, facing up to difficult issues, taking responsibility and risks, and facing an uncertain future. He embodied his message, and thereby avoided becoming a target for attack for most of the long turnaround period.

His personal commitment helped to sway the vast uncommitted. Wexner changed, survived, and thrived. So did The Limited. Between and , the corporation increased sales by 50 percent and its operating margin by 4 percent, with 1, fewer stores, and a reduced workforce of , employees. Acknowledge their loss Remember that when you ask people to do adaptive work, you are asking a lot.

You may be asking them to choose between two values, both of which are important to the way they understand themselves. Any person who has been divorced with children understands how difficult this is. Most of us shudder at the prospect of having to choose between our own happiness and what's best for our children.

We might try to convince ourselves that we are serving the children's happiness by ending a dysfunctional or unsatisfying marriage, but usually the children would not agree and neither would many of the experts.

You may be asking people to close the distance between their espoused values and their actual behavior. Martin Luther King, Jr.

The abhorrent treatment he and his allies received in marches and demonstrations dramatized the gap between the traditional American values of freedom, fairness, and tolerance and the reality of life for African-Americans. He forced many of us, self-satisfied that we were good people living in a good country, to come face-to-face with the gulf between our values and behavior; once we did that, we had to act.

Leadership on the Line: Staying Alive Through the Dangers of Leading

The pain of ignoring our own hypocrisy hurt us more than giving up the status quo. The country changed. Of course, this takes time. Adaptive work often demands some disloyalty to our roots. To tell someone that he should stop being prejudiced is really to tell him that some of the lessons of his loving grandfather were wrong. To tell a Christian missionary that, in the name of love, she may be doing damage to a native community, calls into question the meaning of mission itself.

To suggest to her that, in an age of global interdependence, we can no longer afford to have religious communities compete for divine truth and souls, calls into question the interpretation of scripture lovingly bestowed upon her by family and teachers. People are willing to make sacrifices if they see the reason why. Heifetz and Marty Linsky Asking people to leave behind something they have lived with for years or for generations practically invites them to get rid of you.

Sometimes leaders are taken out simply because they do not appreciate the sacrifice they are asking from others. To them, the change does not seem like much of a sacrifice, so they have difficulty imagining that it seems that way to others. Yet the status quo may not look so terrible to those immersed in it, and may look pretty good when compared to a future that is unknown.

Exercising leadership involves helping organizations and communities figure out what, and whom, they are willing to let go. Of all the values honored by the community, which of them can be sacrificed in the interest of progress?

Indeed, boys go to war with the blessings of their parents to protect values even more precious than life itself. People need to know that the stakes are worth it. But beyond clarifying the values at stake and the greater purposes worth the pain, you also need to name and acknowledge the loss itself. It's not enough to point to a hopeful future. People need to know that you know what you are asking them to give up on the way to creating a better future. Make explicit your realization that the change you are asking them to make is difficult, and that what you are asking them to give up has real value.

Grieve with them, and memorialize the loss. This might be done with a series of simple statements, but often requires something more tangible and public to convince people that you truly understand.

When the terrorists attacked on September 11, , they generated extraordinary disruption and loss to the United States in general and to New York City in particular.

People in New York were forced, not only to grieve losses, but to face a new reality: their own vulnerability. Mayor Rudolph Giuliani seemed immediately to grasp people's struggle to adapt.

He spoke clearly, passionately, and repeatedly, giving voice to people's pain. Between and , the corporation increased sales by 50 percent and its operating margin by 4 percent, with 1, fewer stores, and a reduced workforce of , employees. Acknowledge their loss Remember that when you ask people to do adaptive work, you are asking a lot.

You may be asking them to choose between two values, both of which are important to the way they understand themselves. Any person who has been divorced with children understands how difficult this is. Most of us shudder at the prospect of having to choose between our own happiness and what's best for our children.

We might try to convince ourselves that we are serving the children's happiness by ending a dysfunctional or unsatisfying marriage, but usually the children would not agree and neither would many of the experts. You may be asking people to close the distance between their espoused values and their actual behavior. Martin Luther King, Jr. The abhorrent treatment he and his allies received in marches and demonstrations dramatized the gap between the traditional American values of freedom, fairness, and tolerance and the reality of life for African-Americans.

He forced many of us, self-satisfied that we were good people living in a good country, to come face-to-face with the gulf between our values and behavior; once we did that, we had to act. The pain of ignoring our own hypocrisy hurt us more than giving up the status quo. The country changed.

Of course, this takes time. Adaptive work often demands some disloyalty to our roots. To tell someone that he should stop being prejudiced is really to tell him that some of the lessons of his loving grandfather were wrong. To tell a Christian missionary that, in the name of love, she may be doing damage to a native community, calls into question the meaning of mission itself.

To suggest to her that, in an age of global interdependence, we can no longer afford to have religious communities compete for divine truth and souls, calls into question the interpretation of scripture lovingly bestowed upon her by family and teachers.

Asking people to leave behind something they have lived with for years or for generations practically invites them to get rid of you. Sometimes leaders are taken out simply because they do not appreciate the sacrifice they are asking from others. To them, the change does not seem like much of a sacrifice, so they have difficulty imagining that it seems that way to others. Yet the status quo may not look so terrible to those immersed in it, and may look pretty good when compared to a future that is unknown.

Exercising leadership involves helping organizations and communities figure out what, and whom, they are willing to let go. Of all the values honored by the community, which of them can be sacrificed in the interest of progress? People are willing to make sacrifices if they see the reason why. Indeed, boys go to war with the blessings of their parents to protect values even more precious than life itself.

People need to know that the stakes are worth it. But beyond clarifying the values at stake and the greater purposes worth the pain, you also need to name and acknowledge the loss itself. It's not enough to point to a hopeful future. People need to know that you know what you are asking them to give up on the way to creating a better future.

Make explicit your realization that the change you are asking them to make is difficult, and that what you are asking them to give up has real value. Grieve with them, and memorialize the loss. This might be done with a series of simple statements, but often requires something more tangible and public to convince people that you truly understand.

When the terrorists attacked on September 11, , they generated extraordinary disruption and loss to the United States in general and to New York City in particular. People in New York were forced, not only to grieve losses, but to face a new reality: Mayor Rudolph Giuliani seemed immediately to grasp people's struggle to adapt.

He spoke clearly, passionately, and repeatedly, giving voice to people's pain. Over and over again, he urged people to resume their pre-September 11 activities, to go to work, use the city's parks, and patronize restaurants and theatres, even though everyone's natural response was to hunker down and stay out of harm's way. But as people began to heed his advice, he also let them know that he realized what he was asking them to do.

He asked them to give up their heightened need to maintain a sense of their own personal security on behalf of larger values: Giuliani went even further. He modeled the behavior he was asking of others by putting himself in harm's way, going to Ground Zero over and over again, barely escaping being injured himself on September 11 when the towers fell. Sometimes, modeling the behavior you are asking of others presents itself as an even more powerful way than just words to acknowledge their loss.

Excerpted with permission from Leadership on the Line: Copyright Ronald A. Heifetz and Marty Linsky. Ronald A. Heifetz and Marty Linsky serve on the faculty of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. Linsky is faculty chair of many of the school's executive programs. Martha Lagace: Your book with Ronald A. Heifetz describes the personal, often wrenching, challenges of leadership. You mention that the word "lead" has an Indo-European root meaning "to go forth, die.

According to Heifetz and Linsky, To lead is to live dangerously because when leadership counts, when you lead people through difficult change, you challenge what people hold dear their daily habits, tools, loyalties, and ways of thinking with nothing more to offer perhaps than a possibility.

Leadership on the Line: Staying Alive Through the Dangers of Leading

Heifetz, I want to pay close attention to two very specific items in this book and I expect that by understanding these, I will be a more effective school leader. The two of interest are adaptive challenges and exercising personal pacing by allowing or causing issues to ripen. As noted in this book, Adaptive challenges require leadership. Adaptive changes are problems that are not solvable through expertise or standard operating procedures.

As the Director of Technology for a quite progressive school district I am in the midst of a major adaptive challenge and its certainly up to me and my colleagues to exercise pacing by allowing issues to ripen.

Our goal is to create conditions that will.

The first is that all schools and teachers will create conditions for students. The second is that by providing students and teachers the necessary tools they will become proficient in the use of technology and develop an appreciation and understanding of how it will help them in life after high school.

As I speak with the faculty and many of my colleagues I often explain that this initiative has very little to do with technology, but all to do with creating conditions for learning. You see, I often preach that we must stop using this word technology so much, because things like laptops, cell phones and the Internet are not technology as all these things existed prior to when our students were born. Take a second and imagine speaking to a nine year old today about how revolutionary the Internet is.

Students today are not amazed by this stuff. They were born into it. Its a part of their life and how they live. Yet, when students walk through those doors into school we shield them these powerful learning tools. This continues to be the cornerstone of an adaptive challenge that is happening in our schools.

In education we are faced with a plethora of difficult situations as we move down the pathway of change. I look forward to addressing these issues deeper in later discussions.

So what it is I am asserting? I am offering my students and faculty the possibility of Universal Design for Learning.

How we get there requires some well thought out planning and resources. UDL is a framework for designing curricula that enable all individuals to gain knowledge, skills, and enthusiasm for learning. UDL provides rich supports for learning and reduces barriers to the curriculum while maintaining high achievement standards for all.

Center for Applied Special Technology This initiative is combined with another major initiative called, 1: Imagine trying to convince a group of teachers and parents.

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