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OPEN DANIEL PINCHBECK BROADWAY BOOKS New York '□. * BREAKING) OpEN THE HEAD a psychedelic journey into the Heart of contemp orary. Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. Open City editor Pinchbeck's book debut is a polemic that picks up the threads that Huxley's The Doors of. Daniel Pinchbeck_Breaking Open the medical-site.info - Ebook download as PDF File . pdf), Text File .txt) or read book online.

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Breaking Open The Head Pdf

Breaking Open The Head - [Free] Breaking Open The Head [PDF] [EPUB] "Open House" is the third episode of the fourth season of the. Breaking Open the Head book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. A dazzling work of personal travelogue and cultural critici. . Breaking Open the medical-site.info The title sounds violent but it actually describes the effects from eating the ibola root as practiced around West.

Search the history of over billion web pages on the Internet. Books by Language. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without written permission from the publisher. Visit our website at www. Cataloging-in-Publication Data is on file at the Library of Congress. ISBN 10 9 8 7 6 One must explore deep and believe the incredible to find the new particles of truthfloating in an ocean of insignificance.

Manchmal brauchen wir nur einen Schubs, der uns den Kopf aufbricht. Aug 10, Ogilviemt rated it liked it. The book started off well and I was interested in the subject matter that I didn't know anything about when I started reading. I also liked how each Part of the book was devoted to each entheogenic compound which made it easy for me to keep track of all of the different topics being covered. I quickly found the book less interesting I even started skipping whole paragraphs and sections when what I thought would be a subjective recount of a man's experience with psychoactive substances but inste The book started off well and I was interested in the subject matter that I didn't know anything about when I started reading.

I quickly found the book less interesting I even started skipping whole paragraphs and sections when what I thought would be a subjective recount of a man's experience with psychoactive substances but instead was presented with his Marxism and opinion of how capitalism is a force for evil in the world.

Not only is that thesis demonstrably wrong, but it's a waste of my time and money having downloadd the book to have to sit through that. The book's tone then settles back into the journalistic retelling of his various adventures and chemicals that shamanic tribes have used which once again I found interesting.

But then Daniel decides to change the entire tone into a new-age, alien, morally relativistic nonsensical attributation to alien beings from other dimensions living and guiding humanity through magical plants. It's utter rubbish and a waste of time. The last two Parts of the book can be forgotten entirely. Daniel's lack of skepticism in regards to his experience is the mark of a true buffoon.

I agree with another reviewer in that Daniel likely had some kind of political motivation with this book to perhaps get more cred in his own New York scene. At least it reads like that. This could have been a great book if Daniel had stuck with the subject matter at hand and left out the opinion on political theory and allusions to some alien reality that he supposes must exist.

Three stars for the parts that warrant it. One star for the rest. Apr 15, Jack Barten rated it liked it. This was a refreshing book to read when it came out and the fact that it seems a bit dated now is an indication of how much has happened since then, in terms of use of research chemicals and the expansion of festivals, than a reflection of the book.

It journals a mans journey from that of a cynical hack to a new age neo shamanic enthusiast, via assignments to the jungles to take shamanic potions and also via the use of research chemicals. Those descriptions are a touch navel gazing but better th This was a refreshing book to read when it came out and the fact that it seems a bit dated now is an indication of how much has happened since then, in terms of use of research chemicals and the expansion of festivals, than a reflection of the book.

Those descriptions are a touch navel gazing but better than many accounts of drug use in recent literature.

The books in itself is good but it is unfortunate that much of his subsequent book, The Return of Quetzalcoatl, contained so much information that was a re-hash of it. The descriptions and history of Burning Man are one of the most original aspects of the book and certainly would have helped some decide on whether or not they would wish to spend days in the blazing sun with IT folks.

In terms of writing style, it is perhaps a bit American for English tastes but one certainly gets a sense of the angst of being Daniel Pinchbeck, which is what it's all about. Jul 30, Catherine rated it really liked it Shelves: This is much more than a cultural history of psychedelics. It is an argument for 21st century spirituality, which Pinchbeck claims is necessary to regain different levels of consciousness lost to the Western world.

Towards the end, the book takes a rather bizarre turn but until then it's a good read. As a person who had previously only taken psychedelics for fun, Pinchbeck's book really made me reconsider the possibilities of these drugs and what other realities could be out there. It could have This is much more than a cultural history of psychedelics. It could have done with some information on acquiring some of these drugs, particuarly ibogaine which sounds potentially lifesaving.

Pinchbeck was lucky enough to be able to go to shamanic retreats and that sort of thing through his work but the majority of people don't have that luxury. Aug 23, Teri Dluznieski rated it it was amazing. This is an excellent book about altered consciousness. I particularly like the fact that it instills a need for respect and integrity when working with the invisible realms. Too many people approach drug use, getting drunk and getting "high," casually. This is dangerous. Daniel Pinchbeck's writing and stories illustrate and emphasize this reality very clearly.

I also like how the book is broken down into paired chapters. A first chapter on a particular substance will be historical, anthropologic This is an excellent book about altered consciousness. A first chapter on a particular substance will be historical, anthropological and reference information. The following chapter will be anecdotal information based on personal and direct experiential work. I have recommended and loaned this book to many people. Feb 01, Cindy Brandner rated it it was amazing.

I love a book that makes me look at the world and my own way of thinking differently and this one definitely did that for me. Mar 05, Gray rated it liked it. Some parts were fascinating, others a little scary. It's well written in readable journalistic prose. Recommended if you're interested in the exploration of consciousness.

Mar 09, Barbara rated it it was amazing.

I LOVE this book! Reading this book was like having mental masturbation for me. It breaks open your head. For psychedelic lovers. View 1 comment. Dec 28, No rated it really liked it.

I wanted truth - my own truth, whatever bleak fragment of whatever hellish totality it might turn out to be. I now think of the brain as distinct from the mind as a kind of radio.

With "normative" levels of serotonin, the brain is tuned to the "consensual reality" - something like the local pop or talk radio station. By substituting psilocybin, ibogaine, dimethyltryptamine, or some other psychedelic compound for serotonin and other neurotransmitters, you change the station and suddenly you begin to pick up the sensorial equivalent of avant-garde jazz, Tibetan chants, or another channel resonating with new and astonishing information.

Species of the mushrooms now grow plentifully in Oregon and Washington State and other areas where they were not known before. Like shamans around the world, the seeress and her followers used plant potions to achieve ecstatic states: What can hatred and the mailice of a mortal do to us now, O immortal one?

It is a bitter concoction, made of the bark of a vine and the leaves of a shrub. The flavor is like the distilled essence of forest rot. I felt as if an alien intelligence was coursing through me, examining my organs and nerves and cellular processes, making subtle adjustments. It was like I was a computer and ayahuasca was a program performing scans and repairs. When it had done its work, I threw up - the vomiting was like the beep at the end of a program.

My brew was made from the reddish DMT-containing bark of Mimosa hostilis and a black powdered extract of Syrian Rue Peganum harmala , a Near Eastern plant that produces a mixture of beta-carbolines, like the ayahuasca vine. Syrian Rue has an ancient history of ritual use in the Near East.

Some reseearchers have suggested that the reddish geometrical-patterned hallucinations caused by ingesting Syrian Rue may be the historical origin of the patterns on Arabian carpets, as well as the source of the Arabian myth of flying carpets. Atahuasca is a highly sophisticated jungle chemistry. What kind of world are we creating now? Immediately, multicolored geometries overlaid my interior view screen, spinning and changing at hyperspeed.

What was the meaning of these patterns and hyperreal hallucinatory forms? The pallid scientific thesis - that they were simply self-generated by-products of an overstimulation of the neocortex - does not account for their organized precision.

They were as fully realized as the data seen in the eyes-opened world. Datura contains the same alkaloids as solanaceous plants such as belladonna, henbane, and mandrake, the key ingredients in the "flying potions" of European witchcraft. Datura produces scopolamine and other toxins that act directly on the central nervous system.

I have read many accounts of datura trips, and they are remarkably consistent. The effect is long-lasting and terrifying. It is part of the peculiar logic of the War on Drugs in America that datura, which is dangerous and dissociative and can in fact kill you, is legal to own and to use, while marijuana, one of the least harmful of intoxicants, remains illegal and demonized. Unlike ayahuasca or mushrooms or LSD, datura is the real horror-film hallucinogen - those who ingest the plant find themselves in unreal worlds of psychosis that seem totally convincing.

The spirit of the plant often appears as a cackling witch or beautiful woman. Dreams of flying, of transformation into animals and satanic orgies are common. Unprepared trippers often end their journeys in straitjackets. Jul 20, Greg rated it really liked it. I was recommended this book because of the nature of the subject it discusses, mainly psychedelics. After reading it I was impressed by Daniels knowledge about psychedelics, clearly a subject he has frequented from a young age and his indoctrination into intellectual studies has no doubt enhanced his awareness of the subjects mentioned in the book.

I did however feel the book had a feel to it which revolved around a purely disconnected perspective. Perhaps, at least for me, the book felt like it I was recommended this book because of the nature of the subject it discusses, mainly psychedelics.

Perhaps, at least for me, the book felt like it was a play on words, an ensemble on poetics and intellectualism rather than on the bare foundations of psychedelic experience. I felt like Daniel may have chosen to maintain his identity within this book to a degree that his personal experiences took center stage, I wouldn't say it's an egotistical piece of work but it feels like he is selling his own cultural, social and intellectual heritage as apposed to selling the shamanic journey.

He talks about his apartment, his father, his upbringing, his affluence and education and I feel the disconnection from this and the actual subject could have been more pronounced. It seems at times you are accompanying him through a book which focuses more on his memories and on his personal preferences rather than the separate unbiased perspective of the realms of psychedelic experience and shamanism.

I guess you have to take into account this is a book about him and his experiences but you also expect to learn more about shamanism and about psychedelics and I feel the book weighs heavily towards his own identity, memories and experiences rather than delving deeper into the subjects he attempts to discuss.

Breaking Open the Head: A Psychedelic Journey Into the Heart of Contemporary Shamanism

Don't get me wrong, it's a good book and Daniels use of language and context often appeals and leaves you wanting more, however, there is alot more I'd personally expect from a book of this nature. Oct 23, John rated it really liked it. What starts a relatively objective become a little more woo-woo and New Age-y as it goes on. Also, don't forget he's been accused of being a sexual predator. However, the idea of Shamanism meeting Modernism is an enjoyable and escapist narrative to consider in this world.

The idea that the ecological crisis is a rite of passage or initiation for humanity collectively, forcing us to reach the next level of our consciousness as a species is an idea that fun to consider as the world appears to erod What starts a relatively objective become a little more woo-woo and New Age-y as it goes on.

Full text of "Daniel Pinchbeck BREAKING OPEN THE HEAD"

The idea that the ecological crisis is a rite of passage or initiation for humanity collectively, forcing us to reach the next level of our consciousness as a species is an idea that fun to consider as the world appears to erode. As such, this book is a nice throwback, its fun to consider a time when Burning Man wasn't so compromised and those ideas weren't so commercialized, but Pinchbeck's analysis is of shamanism and his conclusion is that it's a valid choice in a world that favors rational materialism.

He's a bit of a looney when he gets to Quetzalcoatl not in this book , it's the noble idea that we are working towards being Star Children.

The ideas of my favorite writers like Grant Morrison and Jodorowsky still lives on. It's a naive optimism to me, but sometimes we need that. Especially as Childhood ends. Apr 08, Josh rated it liked it.

It's a fun book. I enjoyed some of the commentary on his ventures into shamanic rituals and mind altering substances. He's well read on the pop-literature surrounding these drugs. His arrogance and unskeptical embrace of any and all spiritual practices got tiring, though. He makes comparisons between cultures that highlight a few similarities and brush a myriad of differences under the rug. The author also makes haphazard claims. No, Daniel, shamanism isn't a human universal. How could it be whe It's a fun book.

How could it be when none of the major religions of the world are shamanic in the classic sense?

Daniel Pinchbeck_Breaking Open the Head.pdf

It's a ridiculous book, and impossible to take seriously. Feb 14, Clem Paulsen rated it it was amazing. An interesting survey of various psychedelic substances and the cultures of which they are a part. Pinchbeck is successful in this for the most part. There were a few moments when he lapsed into some amateur physics concerning DNA and was inconsistent about the dangers of various drugs, but these are minor. Aug 23, Briz rated it really liked it.

For such a small book Breaking Open the Head covers a lot of ground. Although I found the author's stories of psychedelic usage to be the most interesting part of the book the historical, botanical and psychological topics covered balanced the overall worth of the book. This is a great primer for anyone who wants to learn more about the potential for hallucinogens to "open doors" as well as Shamanism.

Readers Also Enjoyed. About Daniel Pinchbeck.

Daniel Pinchbeck. Author Daniel Pinchbeck has deep personal roots in the New York counterculture of the s and s. His father was an abstract painter, and his mother, Joyce Johnson, was a member of the Beat Generation and dated Jack Kerouac as On the Road hit the bestseller lists in chronicled in Johnsons bestselling book, Minor Characters: A Beat Memoir. Pinchbeck was a founder of the s literary m Author Daniel Pinchbeck has deep personal roots in the New York counterculture of the s and s. Pinchbeck was a founder of the s literary magazine Open City with fellow writers Thomas Beller and Robert Bingham.

He writes a column, Prophet Motive, for Conscious Enlightment publishing www. Books by Daniel Pinchbeck. Trivia About Breaking Open the No trivia or quizzes yet.

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