Raiders from the north ebook


 

The mighty Empire of the Moghuls burst out of Central Asia into India in the sixteenth century. The first in a compelling new series of novels, Raiders from the North tells the largely unknown story of the rise and fall of the Mogul dynasties. His only son, Babur, faces a seemingly. Read "Empire of the Moghul: Raiders From the North Raiders From the North" by Alex Rutherford available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get £3 off. Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. Drawn largely from the autobiography of Babur, the Kindle Store · Kindle eBooks · Literature & Fiction .

Author:ROSALVA MELOCHICK
Language:English, Spanish, German
Country:Bosnia Herzegovina
Genre:Biography
Pages:318
Published (Last):19.10.2015
ISBN:292-2-66869-632-6
Distribution:Free* [*Register to download]
Uploaded by: EUSEBIA

78479 downloads 151449 Views 17.40MB ePub Size Report


Raiders From The North Ebook

THE EPIC STORY OF ONE OF THE MOST POWERFUL EMPIRES IN HISTORYThe mighty Empire of the Moghuls burst out of Central Asia into India in the. Raiders from the North book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. THE EPIC STORY OF ONE OF THE MOST POWERFUL. Empire of the Moghul: Raiders From the North (Empire of the Moghul Series Book 1) eBook: Alex Rutherford: medical-site.info: Kindle Store.

Shelves: fiction , historical-fiction A nice read, but became bored by the time it was over. It included quite a few details, but since my only other Historical Fiction reading has been that of James Michener's, I ended up comparing, only for the sake of understanding which writer do I truly enjoy more. And Yes, although the Moghul era does interest me, I wish this would have been written by Mr. However, much is well put forth, with the Rutherford's research and travels. I am sure it must have been painstaking. The action A nice read, but became bored by the time it was over. The action scenes have been provided with fine details, although I personally tend to not enjoy action much. The style of writing did not bore me, but since in that era, most of the action took place with wars and capturing land, it became monotonous, which got me bored by the end of the book. I will certainly read the next book in the series after a few months. The beliefs, armies and backgrounds of rulers who walked the World would have been different and yet the motivations and stories have the same hues. The Mughals are one dynasty who left their indelible mark on India and the The path to conquering a nation is always littered with blood and iron. The Mughals are one dynasty who left their indelible mark on India and their importance was only next to the British when it comes to defining the identity of the nation. It is rather interesting to note that a ruler of Mongol-Turkish origins and his descendants ruled over the sub-continent for three centuries.

I am sure it must have been painstaking. The action A nice read, but became bored by the time it was over. The action scenes have been provided with fine details, although I personally tend to not enjoy action much.

The style of writing did not bore me, but since in that era, most of the action took place with wars and capturing land, it became monotonous, which got me bored by the end of the book. I will certainly read the next book in the series after a few months. The beliefs, armies and backgrounds of rulers who walked the World would have been different and yet the motivations and stories have the same hues. The Mughals are one dynasty who left their indelible mark on India and the The path to conquering a nation is always littered with blood and iron.

The Mughals are one dynasty who left their indelible mark on India and their importance was only next to the British when it comes to defining the identity of the nation. It is rather interesting to note that a ruler of Mongol-Turkish origins and his descendants ruled over the sub-continent for three centuries. Alex Rutherford brings the story of the Mughals to vivid and dramatic life through this series with the first book being dedicated to Babur.

Tim Severin. Rome's Lost Son. Robert Fabbri. The Armour of Achilles. Glyn Iliffe. Christian Cameron. The Long Sword. The Emperor's Elephant. Altar of Blood: Empire IX. Anthony Riches. Peter Darman. Thunder of the Gods: Empire VIII. The Gates of Troy. Masters of Rome. Rome's Fallen Eagle. Battle For Rome. Ian James Ross.

Raiders from the North

Master of Mayhem. The Eagle's Vengeance: Empire VI. Army of the Wolf. The Merlin Prophecy Book Three: Hunting with Gods. Destroyer of Cities. Fields of Blood. Ben Kane. Eagles at War. Scourge of Rome. Douglas Jackson. Force of Kings. The Ill-Made Knight. Blood and Steel. Harry Sidebottom.

The Great King. The Emperor's Knives: Empire VII. Parthian Vengeance. The Scourge of Thracia Legionary 4. Gordon Doherty. Sacrifice 5 in the Invader Novella Series. Simon Scarrow. End of Days: A Novel of Medieval England.

James Wilde. The Wolf's Gold: Empire V. Treachery in Tibet. John Wilcox. The Long Hunt. Judson Roberts. The Merlin Prophecy Book Two: In comparison, my history books from school were so very sparse and dry! Drove me nuts. Aug 04, Terri rated it it was ok Shelves: This will be one of those reviews where I don't really have much to say. I am at a complete loss with Raiders of the North, but I will try and loop some words together into what I would say is less of a review and more of a 'view'.

From time to time I want to push myself out of my comfort zone and try something I would not normally read and this book was one of those times. Rome and Rom This will be one of those reviews where I don't really have much to say. Rome and Romans for example. I have more misses than hits when reading historical fiction based on them, because I have little interest in the era from a fictional standpoint, I am much better with non fiction on them.

Sometimes it works out when I push myself to read in these eras. I have found some good books by doing it. But sometimes it does not work out Enter stage right, Raiders from the North. Sadly for Raiders from the North and I am sad about it as I think for anybody who is not me, this could be a very good read I pushed myself out of my comfort zone at the wrong time in my life. It's Autumn, the sun is shining, the garden is having its last growth spurt before winter.

Birds are nesting, singing, darting about. Forget winter wonderlands, here is an Autumnal wonderland. And I'd much rather be in it, enjoying the last of the seasons sunshine, getting my hands dirty in the soil and going for long walks in the hills, than shut away indoors reading a fiction story set in a period of history I have no interest in.

I think I have realised that if I am going to force myself to read books in a least favourite era, I should save it for Winter when the outdoors are not calling me away. Or perhaps even during the scorching heat of Summer, when I seek escape behind closed doors, in an airconditioned room.

I know I have not given this book its due. Another time, another place, another day, another Season and this may have been a very different review full of robust commentary.

Raiders from the North

As for rating it, I can only give it 2 stars and attach this 'view' to it. Hopefully this will fully explain why it is that this book got those miserable 2 stars. I do not really think it is a 2 star book, if that makes sense to you. I think the book is probably a 3 star or even maybe a 4 star. The writing is good, the story seemed intelligently done. I can only rate based on my experience and while I think the book deserves more stars, my personal experience with it, dictates that I give it only 2.

View all 5 comments. A nice read, but became bored by the time it was over. It included quite a few details, but since my only other Historical Fiction reading has been that of James Michener's, I ended up comparing, only for the sake of understanding which writer do I truly enjoy more. And Yes, although the Moghul era does interest me, I wish this would have been written by Mr. However, much is well put forth, with the Rutherford's research and travels. I am sure it must have been painstaking.

The action A nice read, but became bored by the time it was over. The action scenes have been provided with fine details, although I personally tend to not enjoy action much. The style of writing did not bore me, but since in that era, most of the action took place with wars and capturing land, it became monotonous, which got me bored by the end of the book.

I will certainly read the next book in the series after a few months. View 1 comment. Feb 11, Arun Divakar rated it liked it. The path to conquering a nation is always littered with blood and iron.

The beliefs, armies and backgrounds of rulers who walked the World would have been different and yet the motivations and stories have the same hues.

The Mughals are one dynasty who left their indelible mark on India and the The path to conquering a nation is always littered with blood and iron. The Mughals are one dynasty who left their indelible mark on India and their importance was only next to the British when it comes to defining the identity of the nation.

It is rather interesting to note that a ruler of Mongol-Turkish origins and his descendants ruled over the sub-continent for three centuries. Alex Rutherford brings the story of the Mughals to vivid and dramatic life through this series with the first book being dedicated to Babur.

The trend that I have seen in what little historic fiction I have read is that they tend to make heroes of the protagonists. They are paragons of virtue, immovable and strong willed and successful in battle no matter what.

These kind of caricatures tend to get stale after a while for the repetitiveness they bring forth. The rendering of Babur was interesting for he loses more battles than he wins.

Personally I have not read much on the Mughals beyond what I know from my history classes and Babur is only a name I associate with the first battle of Panipat. Fuelled by a desire to outshine his glorious ancestors — Timurlaine and Genghis Khan, the brash and young Babur sets out on military adventures which literally decimate him.

While he fails time and again, the experiences make him a wiser soldier. The tables turn somewhere along the way and his unabashed ambition leads him across the Khyber Pass into India starting off what was known as the first battle of Panipat. Fought between the forces of Babur and the Delhi Sultan — Ibrahim Lodi, it was a decisive one in helping Babur establish a foothold in India.

With the help of mercenaries from the Turkish army, Babur brought in artillery and canons into the battle which ended up killing the Sultan and securing the victory for Babur.

The forces of Babur rode into Delhi and established the first leg of what was later to become the Mughal empire.

The story also introduces the next player in — Humayun who became the second Mughal emperor who proves his valor in battle as a warrior prince against the Rajput ruler , Rana Sangha of Mewar. It is here that Alex Rutherford scores again for he does his job really well. The battle scenes are numerous and captured with all their bloody exaggerations. It tends to get a tad too gory but then it was not a benevolent time and the rulers were not benevolent either.

Being the first book in the series, I did not find much to be distracted about other than mild and rather unwanted melodramatic scenes at places. All considered, I am going to take up the next one in the series soon. View 2 comments. Nov 03, Uttara Srinivasan rated it really liked it. At twelve, an age when his own sons are considered by Babur himself and still too innocent to understand the yearnings of power, Babur assumes the throne of Ferghana.

With the blood of the legendary Timur-i-lang and Genghis Khan in his veins, it is only natural that his life is one full of blood feuds, war, defeat and victory. The book scribes a fictional account of his life's journey from Ferghana all the way to Hin 3. The book scribes a fictional account of his life's journey from Ferghana all the way to Hindustan where he goes on to establish the 'Moghul' Mughal!

It must be said that while Zemindar left me largely disappointed, Raiders from the North, shone much like the mysterious Mountain of Light Koh-i-Noor that makes its appearance rather inexplicably. Perhaps it is my inherent regret that history text books and teachers do such a shoddy job of telling us such gripping tales of power and battles fought over it, but Raiders from the North kept me hooked from the word go and delivered a well-paced, even if superfluous account of the First "Moghul" emperor's lifetime.

While Rutherford uses fairly simple language, his painting of the landscapes, the battles and of the growth in Babur's character are definite highlights of the story. As is the case in most strifes over power - every battle every fought in history, it is women and those without authority who are shortchanged and used as possessions - largely expendable except when they mean honor - which is not very far from how they were viewed by the kings and their enemies.

Alex Rutherford keeps his account of such inhumanity to a minimum - sometimes arguably at a loss of an emotional connect with the book. I must also mention here the twinge of disappointment in my very Indian mind when Babur first arrives and wins over Hindustan. His reaction to temples, the sacred cows, the half-naked holy men with scraggy beards, the acrobats, the heat and the dust is almost comical - or maybe I am just hardened by the perception of India that Western media has long portrayed - something Alex Rutherford chooses to adopt with little creativity.

What is interesting of Babur's strategies for establishing his dominance over Hindustan - especially in current times - is the use of religion as a tool of employee motivation aimed to aid a king's desire to be called emperor.

Words like Jihad, the mosque that may or maynot have been built on the ruins of a Hindu God's birthplace - scary elements for an Indian citizen, appear in the story and stand out for their manipulation by those with nothing but unmasked ambition for greatness.

All in all, this is a promising series - not without its flaws but still thrilling enough for the fourteen year old in me who couldn't run away from her history textbook fast enough and now, for the life of me, cannot understand why it was ever so!

View all 4 comments. Aug 08, Abhishek rated it liked it. A good read and historically correct, but this is not a history textbook and some of the important characters are fictitious. Major events are true and described well. The lifestyle and atmosphere of the time is also vividly depicted.

Give the book the liberty of a being a novel and it is a very good read It tells the story of Babur, how at the age of 12 he becomes the king of his father's little kingdom, how he wins and then looses Samarkand - thrice; becomes the ruler of Kabul, grows restless A good read and historically correct, but this is not a history textbook and some of the important characters are fictitious.

Give the book the liberty of a being a novel and it is a very good read It tells the story of Babur, how at the age of 12 he becomes the king of his father's little kingdom, how he wins and then looses Samarkand - thrice; becomes the ruler of Kabul, grows restless - finally crosses the Indus - into India.

All the pages, save the last few, cover this part of Babur's life. The remaining read about his battles of Panipat and then against Rana Sanga; finishing in Babur's untimely death. The book depicts Babur as a king and ruler -at first young, inexperienced who slowly learns and gains experience; as a good warrior and able strategist; a ruthless tyrant, a cunning leader and a loving family man.

I wish some portions were a bit more explored - like the battle against Rana Sanga but then this is not a textbook and given the constraints under which the authors had to spin the tale, it is a very good piece of work.

Personally, I liked it and enjoyed it. Empires were not built on mere diplomacy. Actions and results determined your fate. By far the biggest travesty to Pakistani history is the omission of Moghul history from the narrative.

Nations have to have selective history, and for some reasons Moghuls have not really featured as favourites in the popular history of Pakistan, which is a great loss indeed.

For which other dynasty was able to rule for about years or so? Their aura was such that even after the end of the the greats reign wit Empires were not built on mere diplomacy. Their aura was such that even after the end of the the greats reign with the passing of Aurangzeb, their reign managed to survive for another 90 odd years? That's huge when you compare with the British reign of 90 years starting in This wonderful book is the first in series of narrative history detailing the life and times of the first great Moghul Babur, charting his course from his tiny kingdom of Ferghana to the mighty seat of Delhi.

His trials and tribulations, harsh choices, tough lifestyle, life threatening decision making, allegiance to friends and family and most of all his unique personality is vividly brought to life in a thriller of a book, which cannot be put down. The book reads like a thriller movie, filled with suspense and drama containing love, rebuttals, revenge, heartaches, suspense, anger, passion, desires, all leading to a terrific legacy.

What about Babur personality? He was almost illiterate, who after becoming a king by birth the age of 12, fought most of his life trying to justify his Taimuri lineage.

It's a classic recipe for success repeated even today by the successful the world over. Belief in your destiny to succeed has to earned by sheer hard work and persistence.

Easy you say, but the real feature of aha it's success were the very supporting family and friends who also shared this remarkable belief in his destiny.

So correct support is vital to fulfil any dream which are all delusions to start with. This support is successful history for a young struggling nation like Pakistan on the macro level. Without owning our great Moghul past and understanding the real reasons for their huge success, how can we succeed?

I humbly salute the two writers for undertaking such a wonderful project. I remain a lifelong fan. Sep 12, Amit Shetty rated it liked it. It has covered most of the details beautifully from his birth to his death, to all the hardships, joys and sorrows he faced, his arrogance and the grave mistakes that came from it and a taste of one of the greatest lineages and an empire that he would leave behind putting him in the league of the Romans, Napoleon and Alexander.

Once I started reading, I felt as though I had made a great mistake with reagrds to the events that took place in Babur's childhood such as how can a 12 year old sever the head of an older vizer in a single slash. Maybe it happened but I still don't believe it. But after reading for sometime, it did start getting intresting with the detailed battle scences from Ferghand, Samrkhand, Kabul and finally India.

Raiders from the North by Alex Rutherford

Some parts actually dealt with the way of life of Babur, the people around him and of those he encountered in several countries which will be a treat for those who are interested in cross cultures.

After reading this book one can understand what Babur faced en route to create his vast empire. Summarising his entire life would be the basic definition of a hurricane.

Also this is not what some one would describe a page turner. This makes me somewhat skeptical of downloading the other 3 in the Moghul series. But maybe sometime in the future Jul 05, D.

I got this as an advance review copy and at first could not get into it. Then on the second reading I stuck with it to the end. As I look back at the book I see that it did not grab me. And as I continued through it, still it was not something I could say was outstanding. It dealt with a subject matter that you think could be rich for a historical novel.

A conquering emperor who loses his capital more than once. The founder of the Moghul empire. Babur should be rich subject matter. But Rutherford I got this as an advance review copy and at first could not get into it. But Rutherford spends so much time telling me about Babur and his life and not showing me, that the reading is dry, not gripping as I mentioned and then rather boring as Babur fails so often that when he finally succeeds there is no passion in the story to show us that is was worth reading.

The author admits to making the device of a few characters, and with matters that happened five hundred years ago, I do not fault him. Where i do is that is a great medium to have provided us with dialogue instead of exposition. We have far too much of the latter. Not near enough of the former, and often in the case of dialogue it is long periods of exposition in any event.

With a conqueror, we want to hear about the battles, the kingly decisions, and struggles. What we have are long list of decisions but focused on why someone would need to be killed and how to do it. Battles, we don't have much of an overview that a commander would do. Babur gets into fights, we see a first person view, and miss his leading a battle. That surely had a great deal to do with victory, but we see little of it.

And then the glimpse we have of his personal experience in the fight doesn't lead me to empathize with the protagonist. This is the first of a multi part series. I would like to know what happens with the dynasty, but I find that I can not get past the writers style and therefore won't be reading any more of them.

Similar articles


Copyright © 2019 medical-site.info.
DMCA |Contact Us