FLIGHTS OF FANTASY: A POET'S QUEST - Kindle edition by Cheryl Dunn. Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best. A dream to fly in the sky high above the earth. A dream to fly over beautiful landscapes of the Earth. The Flights of Fantasy -a Poem . excellent schoolmasters, and teach some of us more than we can ever learn from books. Flights of Fancy book. Read 10 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Life is filled with emotional highs and lows. Riding the wave of t.

Author:TYISHA KOENEMAN
Language:English, Spanish, Arabic
Country:Grenada
Genre:Environment
Pages:277
Published (Last):08.08.2016
ISBN:699-9-22628-182-7
Distribution:Free* [*Register to download]
Uploaded by: CRISTIE

63276 downloads 125872 Views 21.35MB ePub Size Report


Flights Of Fantasy Poem Book

Flights of Fantasy book. Read 6 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Flights of Fantasy is a short story collection edited by Mercedes. medical-site.info - download ICSE Guide to Collection Of Poems book online at best prices in india on medical-site.info Read ICSE Guide to Collection Of Poems book reviews. Flights of Fancy: Short stories and poems to fracture your funny bone eBook: Alifia One of the best books I read and I just love the writing style so I will be.

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. Would you like to tell us about a lower price? If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support? Customers who bought this item also bought. Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of 1. No Fear Shakespeare: The Merchant of Venice. Self-Help to I.

It tells us about the horrors of war and pain and suffering the soldiers had to endure on the battlefield. Further, in comparison to the soldiers, who had received larger wounds and had succumbed to their injuries on the battlefield, his was a small pain. He said so because he was still alive. His fatigue was caused by fighting day and night on the battlefield. It shows that though the soldier was in pain, he was trying to hide his suffering in the true spirit of a soldier.

Due to these injuries he was feeling physically weak and fatigued. The soldier was undergoing a mental pain at the thought of the reaction his wife and mother would have on seeing him sitting defeated on the battlefield. He winced up at the sun with an expression of pain on his face to find out why was it getting dark so early despite the shining sun. It is also symbolic of the final journey, i.

He said so because he could not recall what was his reaction when the wounded soldier died in front of his eyes. It signifies that the narrator was petrified on seeing the horrifying death of the soldier.

The two hardships experienced by the soldier included: It makes the readers— i feel the agony a soldier endures on the battlefield; and ii realise the horrors of war and the need to give up wars for the sake of humanity. It conveys that in Indian society the worth of an individual is measured more by his financial status than anything else.

Fantasy Quotes

The speaker considered his third son as the black sheep in his family because he was not as well off as his other two sons. He is directing this question to his former student. It shows the pretence of the speaker, who feels that we should change with the changing times, but in reality, he himself clings to the old traditions and does not want to change.

He feels so because of the rapid changes taking place in society. Our progress is progressing. The speaker says these words to his former student because he finds him physically healthier than what he was earlier and also because of his status in society.

Stock usage of Indian English b If you were coming this side by chance. Direct translation of the local language v The title of the poem is quite apt because: The speaker has stopped by the woods to watch the snow filling up the woods.

The owner of the woods lives in the village, away from nature. Though he owns the woods, he cannot appreciate and enjoy the beauty of nature.

Thus, there are man-made barriers which separate man from nature. The village symbolises society and civilisation, beyond whose borders lie the woods. He is enchanted by the beauty of the woods.

Unlike, William Wordsworth, another nature poet, who considers nature as a benevolent mother, Frost considers nature as hostile and alien. He finds himself being seduced by the natural beauty of the woods. But, he finds this seduction momentary and the charm is soon broken. He remembers that he has to move away from nature to fulfill his worldly obligations.

The horse has stopped there because the rider speaker wants to see the beauty of the woods. In this poem, the speaker stands by the woods and is enchanted by the beauty of nature. The shaking of the harness bells of his horse symbolising society and the sound of the wind symbolising his inner voice remind him that he cannot give in to irresponsible indulgence by enjoying the sensual pleasures of nature.

He has certain worldly responsibilities which he must fulfill before he goes to sleep or before his life ends. He shakes his harness bells to ask the speaker if he has made a mistake in stopping by the woods. He is reminded of his responsibilities, which he must fulfill before he takes rest. Further, the depiction of nature like freezing cold, frozen lake, falling snow, darkness and complete silence with the only sounds such as those of the shaking of the harness bells and the sweeping wind has been used to create an atmosphere of isolation and mystery.

He cannot enjoy the natural scenery in the woods because he is reminded of his responsibilities, which he must fulfill and move on in life. It is away from human civilisation and enchants the speaker with its beauty and makes him forget his responsibilities. The only sounds that he can hear are those made by the shaking of the harness bells of his horse and that of the sweeping wind.

Presenting Book Marks Best Reviewed Books of 2018

There is complete silence and the only sounds the speaker can hear are from the shaking of the harness bells and the sweeping wind. The narrator was in a relaxed mood and preparing for his daily routine. He thought whether the flashes were magnesium flares seen during the war. The explosion caused fatal injuries to the human beings, burnt their skin and made it drip off their bodies.

The narrator was panic-stricken to see the blood gushing out from his body. The narrator was scared and horrified. He was crushed to death under a gate. The soldier gave the narrator a towel to cover up his naked body and thus, gave him the self-confidence to rise up and move forward. He justified his action of sending his wife alone to the hospital by saying that he had no other choice as he could not walk any further.

Still others were walking with arms stretched out with either a shoulder or a hand dangling loose from their body. The narrator doubted whether they had come straight from the bath because they had no clothes on their bodies. The psychological agony shown in the extract is: The speakers wants to tell her lover not to love her for any particular reason.

The example of cumulative listing in the given extract is: The speaker enumerates her physical characteristics — her smile, her looks and her gentle way of speaking — for which she does not want to be loved, as these characteristics are changeable and not ever lasting. She wants to be loved for true love and not her superficial qualities that would change with the passage of time. In the poem, the speaker asks her lover not to love her for the qualities like her beautiful smile, her looks or her gentle voice.

She recognises that though these qualities may be endearing to him, but would fade away in their appeal to him with the passage of time. However, true love is unconditional and not dependent on such changeable physical traits. She wants his love for her should be eternal. Here, the speaker feels that if her lover loves her for only those traits, his love for her would diminish, when her physical traits would fade away.

Here, the speaker wants to tell her lover that she does not want to be loved out of pity. The rock lay hidden in the sea off the east coast of Scotland. It sometimes remained hidden under sea water during the high tide. The warning bell refers to the bell placed on the Inchcape rock by the Abbot of Aberbrothok, to give a warning to the sailors about the danger from the rock. The warning bell was placed on a buoy and during high tides the movement of waves made the buoy to float and in turn rang the bell and warned the sailors.

The mariners blessed the Abbot Aberbrothok because he placed a bell on the Inchcape Rock, which gave a warning to the mariners about the perilous rock and thus, saved them and their ships from drowning.

It is a heightened narration that uses narrative technique like rhyme and figures of speech.

The two elements of ballad in the given extract are the following: a The rhyming pattern followed in this extract is aabb Swell- Bell; Rock-Aberbrothok. He was a wicked and jealous man.

But the real reason was that in a such calm atmosphere he would be able to carry out his wicked plan of defaming the Abbot of Aberbrothok by cutting off the bell from the Inchcape Rock and thereby, loot the wealth from the shipwrecks. He asked his sailors to lower the boat and row him to the Inchcape Rock. His joyful mood is reflected in the extract by his act of whistling and singing. At the end of the poem, the Rover was in a mood of despair and frustration.

He did so out of jealousy and self-interest. He wanted to spoil the fame and reputation of the Abbot of Aberbrothok, who has placed the bell there. It would also allow him to easily loot the wealth from the shipwrecks, caused by the Inchcape Rock.

The bell was placed on the float because the movement of the float during the high tide would make the bell ring and warn the sailors of the danger from the rock. He became rich by looting the wealth from the ships that struck against the Inchcape Rock. There were strong winds and darkness all around. The weather conditions predicted that finally the Rover would meet his end in the sea.

That is why he carried out his wicked plan of cutting off the warning bell on the Inchcape Rock, placed there by the Abbot. He was a robber who became rich by looting the wealth from the shipwrecks. The Rover, on the other hand, was a jealous and wicked man, who cut off the warning bell on the Inchcape Rock to defame the Abbot and to loot the wealth from the shipwrecks.

The breakers roar normally signify a high tide when the sea waves surge up and down with a great force.

The ringing of the bell would have indicated the presence of the perilous rock and thus saved the ship from colliding with it. There was a thick haze in the atmosphere and total darkness in the absence of the Sun in the sky.

Sir Ralph was optimistic that the weather would improve by night when the moon would rise in the sky. If the sailors had heard the normal expected sound of the warning bell from the Inchcape Rock, they would have saved the ship from striking against the rock. It was a shivering shock because the ship collided with the rock and the waves from all sides began to engulf it. In his frustration, he pulled his hair and cursed himself.

He used to loot wealth from the ships that fatally crashed against the Inchcape Rock. But when the Abbot of Aberbrothok placed a warning bell, he cut off the bell to defame the good Abbot and put the other helpless sailors into trouble.

However, he got caught in his own trap of mischief when his ship struck against the Inchcape Rock and sank in the sea alongwith him. The Rover cut off the bell from the Inchcape Rock, but his own ship struck against the very Rock because of the absence of any warning sound and sank in the sea.

The sound was dreadful because there was no chance of surviving the shipwreck. The dreadful sound, on the other hand was that of the sinking ship that signalled the end of Sir Ralph. Therefore, it appeared to be like a funeral bell being run by the Devil himself. But actually the sound was that of the sinking ship.

The Flights of Fantasy -a Poem | HubPages

Thus, the evil that Sir Ralph plotted for the Abbot and the other sailors, recoiled on him. Sir Ralph, the pirate, went on an adventure trip on the sea with his sailors. He had the valour to take the risk of cutting off the bell from the Inchcape Rock, which the Abbot of Aberbrothok had placed there to warn the sailors.

He did this wicked act out of jealousy as he could not accept the popularity of the good Abbot and wanted to defame him. He also did so because of selfish motive as he used to make wealth by looting money from the ships that crashed after striking against the Inchcape Rock.

They are selling their goods in the market. The poet has used repetition as well as lyrics full of vibrant and colourful images to describe the scene. Ivory dice refers to small cubes made of ivory, having six sides numbered by dots from one to six.

These are used to play games. The sellers, who go about from place to place with their goods for sale are called the pedlars. Cosmetic items included sandalwood and henna and the recreational items included chessmen and ivory dice. The sense of taste is produced by the mention of staple Indian food like lentil and rice and spices.

The gold jewellery reveals that both the owners and the downloaders belonged to the wealthy sections of the society. Sheaths of gold were used by the kings, girdles belts were used by dancers and wristlets, anklets and rings were used by other people.

Frail is an apt description for describing the delicateness of the bells tied to the feet of blue pigeons.

Flights of Fantasy Parade

The landscape, the characters, the images and the background is typically Indian — such as: a the mention of dresses worn by Indians such as turbans and tunics. The flowers are used on sad occasions such as death to pay the last respects by placing flowers on the dead bodies or the graves. He was on the battlefield at that time. It shows the spirit of a soldier, who gives up his life for his country, with a smile on his face.

It tells us about the horrors of war and pain and suffering the soldiers had to endure on the battlefield. Further, in comparison to the soldiers, who had received larger wounds and had succumbed to their injuries on the battlefield, his was a small pain.

He said so because he was still alive. Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of 1.

No Fear Shakespeare: The Merchant of Venice. Self-Help to I. The Merchant of Venice Text with Parphrase. What other items do customers download after viewing this item?

To get the free app, enter mobile phone number. See all free Kindle reading apps. Tell the Publisher! I'd like to read this book on Kindle Don't have a Kindle?