This, along with other questions, will be answered in this revolutionary book that contains Conwell's classic Acres of Diamonds message. You will discover how. Acres of Diamonds book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. In Acres of Diamonds, Russell Conwell shows success is a spiritu. Acres of Diamonds by Russell H. Conwell This book is available for free download in a number of formats - including epub, pdf, azw, mobi and more. You can.

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Acres Of Diamonds Book

Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Acres of Diamonds by Russell H. Conwell Read this book online: HTML. Get personalized recommendations and earn points toward a free book! Before you go Check Out These. 21 Books You've Been Meaning to Read. Russell Herman Conwell (February 15, – December 6, ) was an American Baptist Additionally, during this period, he published about 10 books, including campaign . The original inspiration for "Acres of Diamonds", his most famous essay, occurred in when Conwell was traveling in the Middle East.

We use cookies to give you the best possible experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies. Dispatched from the UK in 2 business days When will my order arrive? Russell Herman Conwell. Dale Carnegie. Elbert Hubbard. John Wanamaker. J C Penney. Home Contact us Help Free delivery worldwide. Free delivery worldwide. Bestselling Series. Harry Potter. Popular Features.

Look at the familiar in new ways. Conwell lists some important inventions — the snap-button, the cotton gin, the mowing machine — and notes that these were created by everyday people who found new approaches and new uses for commonplace objects. Learn what people want, then give it to them. Discover a market, and the provide a good or a service. Too many people do this the other way around.

They develop a good or a service and then try to market it, try to manufacture desire. You'll have more success if you see a desire and then try to meet it. Knowledge is more important than capital. Lack of capital is a common excuse for not starting a business venture.

He gives anecdotes of wealthy people who started with nothing but an idea. Don't put yourself down, and don't belittle your environment. Don't compare yourself with others. There was never an opportunity greater. Conwell says that inside each of us are the seeds of greatness. I dreamed of doing something — I didn't know what — until one day I found an opportunity that had been in front of me all the time: this site.

Have you taken stock of your life lately? Perhaps there are diamonds sitting just outside your back door. It's short, though, and in the public domain. You could probably read the entire thing in less than an hour while sitting at your desk. There are two versions freely available online. Many of them I have forgotten, and I am glad I have, but there is one I shall never forget.

The old guide was leading my camel by its halter along the banks of those ancient rivers, and he told me story after story until I grew weary of his story-telling and ceased to listen. I have never been irritated with that guide when he lost his temper as I ceased listening.

But I remember that he took off his Turkish cap and swung it in a circle to get my attention. I could see it through the corner of my eye, but I determined not to look straight at him for fear he would tell another story. But although I am not a woman, I did finally look, and as soon as I did he went right into another story. I really feel devoutly thankful, that there are 1, young men who have been carried through college by this lecture who are also glad that I did listen.

The old guide told me that there once lived not far from the River Indus an ancient Persian by the name of Ali Hafed. He said that Ali Hafed owned a very large farm; that he had orchards, grain-fields, and gardens; that he had money at interest and was a wealthy and contented man.

One day there visited that old Persian farmer one of those ancient Buddhist priests, one of the wise men of the East. He sat down by the fire and told the old farmer how this old world of ours was made. He said that this world was once a mere bank of fog, and that the Almighty thrust His finger into this bank of fog, and began slowly to move His finger around, increasing the speed until at last He whirled this bank of fog into a solid ball of fire.

Then it went rolling through the universe, burning its way through other banks of fog, and condensed the moisture without, until it fell in floods of rain upon its hot surface, and cooled the outward crust. Then the internal fires bursting outward through the crust threw up the mountains and hills, the valleys, the plains and prairies of this wonderful world of ours.

If this internal molten mass came bursting out and cooled very quickly, it became granite; less quickly copper, less quickly silver, less quickly gold, and, after gold, diamonds were made. The old priest told Ali Hafed that if he had one diamond the size of his thumb he could purchase the county, and if the had a mine of diamonds he could place his children upon thrones through the influence of their great wealth.

Ali Hafed heard all about diamonds, how much they were worth, and went to his bed that night a poor man. He had not lost anything, but he was poor because he was discontented, and discontented because he feared he was poor.

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Early in the morning he sought out the priest. I know by experience that a priest is very cross when awakened early in the morning, and when he shook that old priest out of his dreams, Ali Hafed said to him: "Will you tell me where I find diamonds?

What do you want with diamonds? That is all you have to do; go and find them, and then you have them. All you have to do is to go and find them, and then you have them.

He began his search, very properly to my mind, at the Mountains of the Moon. Afterward he came around into Palestine, then wandered on into Europe, and at last when his money was all spent and he was in rags, wretchedness, and poverty, he stood on the shore of that bay at Barcelona, in Spain, when a great tidal wave came rolling in between the pillars of Hercules, and the poor, afflicted, suffering, dying man could not resist the awful temptation to cast himself into that incoming tide, and he sank beneath its foaming crest, never to rise in this life again.

Then after that old guide had told me that awfully sad story, he stopped the camel I was riding on and went back to fix the baggage that was coming off another camel, and I had an opportunity to muse over his story while he was gone.

That was the first story I had ever heard told in my life, and would be the first one I ever read, in which the hero was killed in the first chapter. I had but one chapter of that story, and the hero was dead. When the guide came back and took up the halter of my camel, he went right ahead with the story, into the second chapter, just as though there had been no break. He pulled out a black stone having an eye of light reflecting all the hues of the rainbow.

He took the pebble into the house and put it on the mantel which covers the central fires, and forgot all about it. Has Ali Hafed returned?

Acres of Diamonds

That is nothing but a stone we found right out here in our own garden. I know positively that is a diamond. There came up other more beautiful and valuable gems then the first. The Kohinoor, and the Orloff of the crown jewels of England and Russia, the largest on earth, came from that mine.

Those Arab guides have morals to their stories, although they are not always moral. I told him of a man out in California in , who owned a ranch. He heard they had discovered gold in southern California, and so with a passion for gold he sold his ranch to Colonel Sutter, and away he went, never to come back. Colonel Sutter put a mill upon a stream that ran through that ranch, and one day his little girl brought some wet sand from the raceway into their home and sifted it through her fingers before the fire, and in that falling sand a visitor saw the first shining scales of real gold that were ever discovered in California.

The man who had owned that ranch wanted gold, and he could have secured it for the mere taking. Indeed, thirty-eight millions of dollars has been taken out of a very few acres since then. About eight years ago I delivered this lecture in a city that stands on that farm, and they told me that a one-third owner for years and years had been getting one hundred and twenty dollars in gold every fifteen minutes, sleeping or waking, without taxation.

But a better illustration really than that occurred here in our town of Pennsylvania. If there is anything I enjoy above another on the platform, it is to get one of these German audiences in Pennsylvania, and fire that at them, and I enjoy it tonight. There was a man living in Pennsylvania, not unlike some Pennsylvanians you have seen, who owned a farm, and he did with that farm just what I should do with a farm if I owned one in Pennsylvania- he sold it. But before he sold it he decided to secure employment collecting coal-oil for his cousin, who was in the business in Canada, where they first discovered oil on this continent.

They dipped it from the running streams at that early time. So this Pennsylvania farmer wrote to his cousin asking for employment. You see, friends, this farmer was not altogether a foolish man.

Acres of Diamonds

No, he was not. He did not leave his farm until he had something else to do. That has especial reference to my profession, and has no reference whatever to a man seeking a divorce. He studied the subject until he found that the drainings really of those rich beds of coal furnished the coal-oil that was worth pumping, and then he found how it came up with the living springs. He studied until he knew what it looked like, smelled like, tasted like, and how to refine it. He had scarcely gone from that place before the man who purchased the spot went out to arrange for the watering of the cattle.

He found the previous owner had gone out years before and put a plank across the brook back of the barn, edgewise into the surface of the water just a few inches. The purpose of that plank at that sharp angle across the brook was to throw over to the other bank a dreadful-looking scum through which the cattle would not put their noses. But with that plank there to throw it all over to one side, the cattle would drink below, and thus that man who had gone to Canada had been himself damming back for twenty-three years a flood of coal-oil which the state geologists of Pennsylvania declared to us ten years later was even then worth a hundred millions of dollars to our state, a thousand millions of dollars.

I found it in Massachusetts, and I am sorry I did because that is the state I came from. This young man in Massachusetts furnishes just another phase of my thought. He went to Yale College and studied mines and mining, and became such an adept as a mining engineer that he was employed by the authorities of the university to train students who were behind their classes.

Acres of Diamonds eBook by Russell H. Conwell | Official Publisher Page | Simon & Schuster

As he was an only son and she a widow, of course he had his way. They always do. I have friends who are not here because they could not afford a ticket, who did have stock in that company at the time this young man was employed there.

This young man went out there and I have not heard a word from him. But I do know the other end of the line. He had scarcely gotten the other end of the old homestead before the succeeding owner went out to dig potatoes. The potatoes were already growing in the ground when he bought the farm, and as the old farmer was bringing in a basket of potatoes it hugged very tight between the ends of the stone fence.

You know in Massachusetts our farms are nearly all stone wall. There you are obliged to be very economical of front gateways in order to have some place to put the stone. When that basket hugged so tight he set it down on the ground, and then dragged on one side, and pulled on the other side, and as he was dragging that basket though this farmer noticed in the upper and outer corner of that stone wall, right next the gate, a block of native silver eight inches square.

My friends, that mistake is very universally made, and why should we even smile at him. I often wonder what has become of him. As I come here to-night and look around this audience I am seeing again what through these fifty years I have continually seen — men that are making precisely that same mistake.

I often wish I could see the younger people, and would that the Academy had been filled to-night with our high school scholars and our grammar-school scholars, that I could have them to talk to. While I would have preferred such an audience as that, because they are most susceptible, as they have not gotten into any custom that they cannot break, they have not met with any failures as we have; and while I could perhaps do such an audience as that more good than I can do grown-up people, yet I will do the best I can with the material I have.

It was one of the purest diamonds that has ever been discovered, and it has several predecessors near the same locality. I went to a distinguished professor in mineralogy and asked him where he thought those diamonds came from. The professor secured the map of the geologic formations of our continent, and traced it.

He said it went either through the underlying carboniferous strata adapted for such production, westward through Ohio and the Mississippi, or in more probability came eastward through Virginia and up the shore of the Atlantic Ocean. It is a fact that the diamonds were there, for they have been discovered and sold; and that they were carried down there during the drift period, from some northern locality. Now who can say but some person going down with his drill in Philadelphia will find some trace of a diamond-mine yet down here?

Oh, friends! You cannot say that you are not over one of the greatest diamond-mines in the world, for such a diamond as that only comes from the most profitable mines that are found on earth. But it serves to simply to illustrate my thought, which I emphasize by saying if you do not have the actual diamond-mines literally you have all that they would be good for to you.

Because now that the Queen of England has given the greatest compliment ever conferred upon American woman for her attire because she did not appear with any jewels at all at the late reception in England, it has almost done away with the use of diamonds anyhow. All you would care for would be the few you would wear if you wish to be modest, and the rest of you would sell for money. Now then, I say again that the opportunity to get rich, to attain unto great wealth, is here in Philadelphia now, within the reach of almost every man and woman who hears me speak to-night, and I mean just what I say.

I have not come to this platform even under these circumstances to recite something to you. There never was a place on earth more adapted than the city of Philadelphia to-day, and never in the history of the world did a poor man without capital have such an opportunity to get rich quickly and honestly as he has now in our city.

I say it is the truth, and I want you to accept it as such; for if you think I have come to simply recite something, then I would better not be here. I have no time to waste in any such talk, but to say the things I believe, and unless some of you get richer for what I am saying to night my time is wasted. I say that you ought to get rich, and it is our duty to get rich.

The men who get rich may be the most honest men you find in the community. The foundation of your faith is altogether false. Let me say here clearly, and say it briefly, though subject to discussion which I have not time for here, ninety-eight out of one hundred of the rich men of America are honest. That is why they are rich. That is why they carry on great enterprises and find plenty of people to work with them. It is because they are honest men.

But they are so rare a thing in fact that the newspapers talk about them all the time as a matter of news until you get the idea that all the other rich men got rich dishonestly. My friend, you take and drive me—if you furnish the auto-out into the suburbs of Philadelphia, and introduce me to the people who own their homes around this great city, those beautiful homes with gardens and flowers, those magnificent homes so lovely in their art, and I will introduce you to the very best people in character as well as in enterprise in our city, and you know I will.

A man is not really a true man until he owns his own home, and they that own their homes are made more honorable and honest and pure, true and economical and careful, by owning the home. For a man to have money, even in large sum, is not an inconsistent thing.

Oh, the inconsistency of such doctrines as that! Money is power, and you ought to be reasonably ambitious to have it. You ought because you can do more good with it than you could without it. Money printed your Bible, money builds your churches, money sends your missionaries, and money pays your preachers, and you would not have many of them, either, if you did not pay them.

I am always willing that my church should raise my salary, because the church that pays the largest salary always raises it the easiest. You never knew an exception to it in your life. The man who gets the largest salary can do the most good with the power that is furnished to him.

Of course he can if his spirit be right to use it for what it is given to him. I say, then, you ought to have money. If you can honestly attain unto riches in Philadelphia, it is our Christian and godly duty to do so.

It is an awful mistake of these pious people to think you must be awfully poor in order to be pious.

I wont give in but what I sympathize with the poor, but the number of poor who are to be with is very small. To sympathize with a man whom God has punished for his sins, thus to help him when God would still continue a just punishment, is to do wrong, no doubt about it, and we do that more than we help those who are deserving. It is all wrong to be poor, anyhow. Let us give in to that argument and pass that to one side.

Of course there are some things higher than money. Oh yes, I know by the grave that has left me standing alone that there are some things in this world that are higher and sweeter and purer than money. Well do I know there are some things higher and grander than gold. Money is power, money is force, money will do good as harm. In the hands of good men and women it could accomplish, and it has accomplished, good. I hate to leave that behind me.

She earns all the money that comes into that house, and he smokes a part of that on the veranda. And yet there are some people who think in order to be pious you must be awfully poor and awfully dirty.

That does not follow at all. While we sympathize with the poor, let us not teach a doctrine like that. Yet the age is prejudiced against advising a Christian man or, as a Jew would say, a godly man from attaining unto wealth.

The prejudice is so universal and the years are far enough back, I think, for me to safely mention that years ago up at Temple University there was a young man in our theological school who thought he was the only pious student in that department. President, I think it is my duty sir, to come in and labor with you. You spoke to make him a good man. So out he went for the Bible, and soon he stalked into my office with the Bible open, with all the bigoted pride of the narrow sectarian, of one who founds his Christianity on some misinterpretation of Scripture.

President; you can read it yourself. You belong to another denomination. You are taught in the theological school, however, that emphasis is the exegesis. Now, will you take that Bible and read it yourself, and give the proper emphasis to it? I have lived through fifty years of the mightiest battle that old Book has ever fought, and I have lived to see its banners flying free; for never in the history of this world did the great minds of earth so universally agree that the Bible is true-all true-as they do at this very hour.

So I say that when he quoted right, of course he quoted the absolute truth. The love of money. What is that? The man that worships the dollar instead of thinking of the purposes for which it ought to be used, the man who idolizes simply money, the miser that hordes his money in the cellar, or hides it in his staking, or refuses to invest it where it will do the world good, that man who hugs the dollar until the eagle squeals has in him the root of all evil.

If you have not made over a thousand dollars in twenty years in Philadelphia, it would have been better for Philadelphia if they had kicked you out of the city nineteen years and nine months ago. A man has no right to keep a store in Philadelphia twenty years and not make at least five hundred thousand dollars, even thought it be a corner grocery-up-town. There is wealth right within the sound of your voice.

A preacher never knows a thing about business. My father kept a country store, and if there is any place under the stars where a man gets all sorts of experience in every kind of mercantile transactions, it is in the country store. I am not proud of my experience, but sometimes when my father was away he would leave me in charge of the store, thought fortunately for him that was not very often.

This, along with other questions, will be answered in this revolutionary book that contains Conwell's classic Acres of Diamonds message. You will discover how this lawyer, minister, writer, lecturer, educator, and diplomat who represented the City of Brotherly Love left a legacy that is still changing countless lives today.

His famous Acres of Diamonds message will also challenge you to seek opportunities to find true wealth right in your own backyard without getting sidetracked by selfishness and greed.

The same principles that transformed Russell Conwell into one of the most charitable millionaires during his time, will also revolutionize your life as you read his timeless message contained in this book! Other books in this series. Acres of Diamonds Russell Herman Conwell. Add to basket. Advantages of Poverty Dale Carnegie. A Message to Garcia Elbert Hubbard. Rating details.

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