The blood of flowers pdf


 

Blood & Flowers · Read more The Intelligence of Flowers. Read more Bad Blood: a Virgil Flowers novel · Read more. The Blood of Flowers. Anita Amirrezvani talks about inspirations, Iran, and the origins of her first novel. The Blood of Flowers is a rich historical story of one. Download The Blood of Flowers Ebook PDF Free Download. In the fabled city of Isfahan, in seventeenth-century Persia, a young woman confronts a dismal fate.

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The Blood Of Flowers Pdf

Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. In Iranian-American Amirrezvani's lushly orchestrated debut, a comet signals misfortune to the remote 17th-century . Her one and only book, The Blood of Flowers, took nine years to PDF. Interview , 6). The main character of the Blood of Flowers once said,. “I will never. di, 26 mrt GMT flowers in the blood pdf - Read Online Now flowers in the blood Ebook. PDF at our Library. Get flowers in the blood PDF.

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Stop over analyzing it and just enjoy it. And that's what I did. I liked how our intentionally nameless protagonist was an adored daughter, then a homeless waif, then a sex slave essentially then a homeless waif again, and all the while a blossoming rug-maker. I like the things she discovered about herself, about her parents, about the world.

If that sounds boring then might I recommend this to anyone interested in textiles, Persian rugs, especially. I suspect such readers will enjoy the descriptions of rug-making that weave yes, I totally did that throughout the tale. Anyone who likes storytelling within stories will enjoy this well, probably. Now I'm going to be an ass. I kept wanting this guy to show up and sweep nameless rug-maker off her feet so she could marry him and tell us how great he was at sex: Because I would totally be part of that dude's harem.

Jun 11, Dem rated it liked it. As a lover of historical fiction I was really looking forward to this novel. The Blood of Flowers is a really enjoyable novel about a young woman and only child whose gift as a rug designer transforms her life.

This novel details Persian rug-making, and brings to life the sights sounds and life of 17th-century Isfahan. This is a powerful and haunting story about a 14 year old girls j 3.

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This is a powerful and haunting story about a 14 year old girls journey from her carefree childhood into adulthood and a great insight into a world unknown to most of us. I really enjoy novels that depict different cultures and customs and really found this novel interesting especially the way in which the people lived and the scenery of this country which was very well described in the novel.

The author spent nine years researching and writing this book and when reading the novel you certainly appreciate the time and effort that went into this book as the author not only tells a story she educates the reader along the way. I really enjoyed the characters and this novel has a wonderful sense of time and place which is so important to me when reading historical fiction novels. I probably would have given this book 4 stars but I found the fairytale stories within the story quite tedious and while a couple seemed to fit with the plot other just seemed pointless and for me took away from the overall enjoyment of the novel.

Having said that this is a very enjoyable and interesting read and one I will recommend to friends. I also think this would make a great book club read as there are lots of topics for discussion. View all 4 comments. Dec 24, Amanda rated it really liked it. This novel provides a fascinating look into the culture of 17th century Persia, especially from the perspective of women of all social classes. Particularly fascinating was the detailed look at the art of rugmaking and the traditional folk stories told by the narrator and the narrator's mother.

I also liked that the narrator was headstrong and willful, but in a realistic way that often ended in tragedy for her.

Such a narrator made the story accessible for both a modern and a Western audience as This novel provides a fascinating look into the culture of 17th century Persia, especially from the perspective of women of all social classes.

Such a narrator made the story accessible for both a modern and a Western audience as it made me realize how brash American thinking and actions can have implications one can not predict nor even imagine when interacting with another society--particularly those in the Middle East. While the story seems to often be headed in the traditional "happily ever after" direction, it doesn't--a few plot lines that I thought were going to be trite and predictable actually surprised me by not ending up where I thought they would trying not to give away any spoilers here, but suffice it to say that I found the ending to be very appropriate.

Anita Amirrezvani has in this novel of historical fiction told of life during the reign of Shah Abbas the Great of Persia. It is thoroughly engaging. It accomplishes what the best historical fiction can do; enveloping the readers in a foreign time and place, teaching about a culture, not just the dry facts, but rather how life would be there and then.

You forget you are leaning and instead absorb the culture through the lives of people you encounter in the story. Shah Abbas reign from Anita Amirrezvani has in this novel of historical fiction told of life during the reign of Shah Abbas the Great of Persia.

Shah Abbas reign from promoted Iranian culture and the arts, including the famed Isfahan carpets. Carpet making and the lives of the people who made these carpets is the central theme of the book.

What was it like to be a carpet maker at those times, in the s in Persia? How were they made, what designs were used, what dyes were available? And the questions diversify.

What were the bazaars like? How did the people live? Where did they bathe? Customers who viewed this item also viewed What foods did they eat?

What herbal remedies were chosen? What mystical customs were believed in? What were the beliefs of the common people? The comet that crossed the sky, what did that portend?

And how did men and women relate to each other? I learned a lot and it all sunk in without an effort. All of these questions are answered. And as befits a novel about art, and making rugs is an art, the language was vivid and colorful, as vivid as the rugs themselves.

For centuries there has existed the Iranian practice of sigheh. This is a legal marriage contract for a specified time period. Thus the contract was temporary, although it could be renewed.

Why would a woman do this? She loses her virginity, and once lost it can never be bought back. Her value is gone. Some women were forced into this by their parents. Some women hoped they would become pregnant, and maybe a permanent marriage contract would follow. Sigheh is a central theme of this novel, and you will understand what it really was like to live under such a contract.

Poems and tales are a central part of Persian culture. The author interweaves known Persian fables seamlessly into the story. Two of them are her own, but they are indistinguishable from the original tales. I loved all of them. I never wanted to stop reading. The plot line drew my attention and kept me turning the pages. It was neither predictable nor unbelievable. The ending worked for me. I cannot explain more without giving spoilers.

The Blood Of Flowers (English Edition) por Anita Amirrezvani

It could have turned out this way, with a little bit of luck. Given all the misfortune, I want a book with a little bit of happiness too.

No, it was not unbelievable at all! Fables are both a central part of the book and the Iranian culture and so the ending worked too. More I will not say. You must read the book to understand completely. There is friendship and respect and astounding cruelty, but all, except for one character that was mean from start to finish, were such a delightful mix of good and bad that they felt made of flesh and bone. You can almost forgive some of the bad things that happen.

Only some things, other happenings will infuriate you. Overall there is a good mix. It was the dot over the i, just the perfect ending for a really great book of historical fiction. The author has recently written another novel: Equal of the Sun.

I will have to read that too. View all 10 comments. This is historical fiction at its best, thoroughly absorbing the reader in another time and place and introducing them to past cultures and ways of "I thought about all the labour and suffering hidden beneath a carpet [ This is historical fiction at its best, thoroughly absorbing the reader in another time and place and introducing them to past cultures and ways of life.

I was captivated by the beautiful descriptions of Isfahan, the city's sights, the work of the carpet makers and other craftsman, the food, the folklore. It was a wonderful experience in which I really felt that I had been transported to this time and place. The novel is a beautiful coming-of-age story of a young girl who has a gift for traditional carpet craft as she moves, due to some rather tragic events, from the familiarity of her carefree childhood home in a small village to the world of the unknown in the big city.

I loved that the protagonist is determined and passionate, but clearly very young and immature, which means that she fails to think things through properly before making some very poor decisions.

The book clearly shows how difficult the position of women at this time was, by the fact that the decisions of a girl this young can have such harsh consequences for both her and her family.

The urge to shake some sense into her was so strong, but only because she was such a realistic, sympathetic and likeable character, and her bad decisions were very believable due to her inexperience and rashness. I really cared for her as a character, so this part of the novel was particularly strong.

By the end of the novel, the reader has observed as the protagonist matures and grows in many different ways, and despite being a dark and difficult book at times, I also felt this made the novel beautifully uplifting and hopeful.

As I said, there are parts of the novel that are very dark. One of the important lessons that the protagonist learns is that life is very often unfair, especially for a woman. For some reason, I've read a lot of very depressing books recently, but although there is a lot of pain, suffering and cruelty covered in this novel, Amirrezvani demonstrates that usually life is a mix of the good and the bad.

Some reviewers have said parts of the book were a little bit "fairy-tale", but I don't think so at least not in the sense that the events are unrealistic. I'd like to believe that there is a lot of good in the world, along with the bad, and I was glad to read a book that reflects that. That said, fables or fairy tales play an important role in Persian heritage and culture, and, therefore, Amirrezvani decided to include several adapted folk tales, scattered throughout the novel, which complimented the events of the main narrative.

These tales were excellent and I appreciated them as another fascinating insight into the culture. Rather, it's a new fairy tale, one that I felt was woven as beautifully as the rugs described therein. The reader, Shohreh Aghdashloo you know, this woman makes this story magical, wonderful, intriguing, and even sensuous probably because of her dusky voice and lovely accent but also because she does a good job subtly bringing the characters to life.

I highly recommend listening to this The author is Iranian-American and she says in the interview at the end that she came to the States at a young age but that she returned to Iran to visit family when she was older. This fairy tale-like story, based only in the author's imagination and not on an older tale, blends Persian storytelling with American story-hearing, which is to say it showcases an older culture fairly different from what we're used to but that it makes sense to the American reader because of the way it is told, with the beginning that flows to the middle that flows to the end.

No, not all cultures tell their stories that way but we Americans love order so that's how we structure our tales. Anyway, it starts like a Disneyfied bit of the Arabian nights and then suddenly gets real and finally morphs into a by-the-bootstraps tale see? Appeals to American sensibilities! It's recognizable and relatable while still foreign. The treatment of women in this story is going to upset some readers.

I was more grossed out by the old men and their young wives thing; that always makes me feel a bit skeeved. I kept having to remind myself: A that this is a reflection of societal norms from another time in another culture ; B that it's a story.

I'm supposed to listen, reflect, and learn, not judge hahahah! I just said that to sound smart. Stop over analyzing it and just enjoy it. And that's what I did. I liked how our intentionally nameless protagonist was an adored daughter, then a homeless waif, then a sex slave essentially then a homeless waif again, and all the while a blossoming rug-maker.

I like the things she discovered about herself, about her parents, about the world. If that sounds boring then might I recommend this to anyone interested in textiles, Persian rugs, especially. I suspect such readers will enjoy the descriptions of rug-making that weave yes, I totally did that throughout the tale.

Anyone who likes storytelling within stories will enjoy this well, probably. Now I'm going to be an ass. I kept wanting this guy to show up and sweep nameless rug-maker off her feet so she could marry him and tell us how great he was at sex: Because I would totally be part of that dude's harem. Jun 11, Dem rated it liked it. As a lover of historical fiction I was really looking forward to this novel.

The Blood of Flowers is a really enjoyable novel about a young woman and only child whose gift as a rug designer transforms her life. This novel details Persian rug-making, and brings to life the sights sounds and life of 17th-century Isfahan. This is a powerful and haunting story about a 14 year old girls j 3. This is a powerful and haunting story about a 14 year old girls journey from her carefree childhood into adulthood and a great insight into a world unknown to most of us.

I really enjoy novels that depict different cultures and customs and really found this novel interesting especially the way in which the people lived and the scenery of this country which was very well described in the novel. The author spent nine years researching and writing this book and when reading the novel you certainly appreciate the time and effort that went into this book as the author not only tells a story she educates the reader along the way. I really enjoyed the characters and this novel has a wonderful sense of time and place which is so important to me when reading historical fiction novels.

I probably would have given this book 4 stars but I found the fairytale stories within the story quite tedious and while a couple seemed to fit with the plot other just seemed pointless and for me took away from the overall enjoyment of the novel.

Having said that this is a very enjoyable and interesting read and one I will recommend to friends. I also think this would make a great book club read as there are lots of topics for discussion. View all 4 comments. Dec 24, Amanda rated it really liked it. This novel provides a fascinating look into the culture of 17th century Persia, especially from the perspective of women of all social classes.

Particularly fascinating was the detailed look at the art of rugmaking and the traditional folk stories told by the narrator and the narrator's mother. I also liked that the narrator was headstrong and willful, but in a realistic way that often ended in tragedy for her.

Such a narrator made the story accessible for both a modern and a Western audience as This novel provides a fascinating look into the culture of 17th century Persia, especially from the perspective of women of all social classes.

Such a narrator made the story accessible for both a modern and a Western audience as it made me realize how brash American thinking and actions can have implications one can not predict nor even imagine when interacting with another society--particularly those in the Middle East. While the story seems to often be headed in the traditional "happily ever after" direction, it doesn't--a few plot lines that I thought were going to be trite and predictable actually surprised me by not ending up where I thought they would trying not to give away any spoilers here, but suffice it to say that I found the ending to be very appropriate.

Anita Amirrezvani has in this novel of historical fiction told of life during the reign of Shah Abbas the Great of Persia. It is thoroughly engaging. It accomplishes what the best historical fiction can do; enveloping the readers in a foreign time and place, teaching about a culture, not just the dry facts, but rather how life would be there and then.

You forget you are leaning and instead absorb the culture through the lives of people you encounter in the story. Shah Abbas reign from Anita Amirrezvani has in this novel of historical fiction told of life during the reign of Shah Abbas the Great of Persia. Shah Abbas reign from promoted Iranian culture and the arts, including the famed Isfahan carpets. Carpet making and the lives of the people who made these carpets is the central theme of the book.

What was it like to be a carpet maker at those times, in the s in Persia? How were they made, what designs were used, what dyes were available? And the questions diversify. What were the bazaars like? How did the people live? Where did they bathe? Customers who viewed this item also viewed What foods did they eat?

What herbal remedies were chosen? What mystical customs were believed in? What were the beliefs of the common people? The comet that crossed the sky, what did that portend? And how did men and women relate to each other? I learned a lot and it all sunk in without an effort.

All of these questions are answered. And as befits a novel about art, and making rugs is an art, the language was vivid and colorful, as vivid as the rugs themselves. For centuries there has existed the Iranian practice of sigheh. This is a legal marriage contract for a specified time period. Thus the contract was temporary, although it could be renewed.

Why would a woman do this? She loses her virginity, and once lost it can never be bought back. Her value is gone. Some women were forced into this by their parents.

The Blood of Flowers

Some women hoped they would become pregnant, and maybe a permanent marriage contract would follow. Sigheh is a central theme of this novel, and you will understand what it really was like to live under such a contract.

Poems and tales are a central part of Persian culture. The author interweaves known Persian fables seamlessly into the story. Two of them are her own, but they are indistinguishable from the original tales. I loved all of them. I never wanted to stop reading. The plot line drew my attention and kept me turning the pages. It was neither predictable nor unbelievable. The ending worked for me. I cannot explain more without giving spoilers. It could have turned out this way, with a little bit of luck.

Given all the misfortune, I want a book with a little bit of happiness too. No, it was not unbelievable at all! Fables are both a central part of the book and the Iranian culture and so the ending worked too.

More I will not say. You must read the book to understand completely. There is friendship and respect and astounding cruelty, but all, except for one character that was mean from start to finish, were such a delightful mix of good and bad that they felt made of flesh and bone. You can almost forgive some of the bad things that happen.

Only some things, other happenings will infuriate you. Overall there is a good mix. It was the dot over the i, just the perfect ending for a really great book of historical fiction. The author has recently written another novel: Equal of the Sun. I will have to read that too. View all 10 comments. This is historical fiction at its best, thoroughly absorbing the reader in another time and place and introducing them to past cultures and ways of "I thought about all the labour and suffering hidden beneath a carpet [ This is historical fiction at its best, thoroughly absorbing the reader in another time and place and introducing them to past cultures and ways of life.

I was captivated by the beautiful descriptions of Isfahan, the city's sights, the work of the carpet makers and other craftsman, the food, the folklore. It was a wonderful experience in which I really felt that I had been transported to this time and place.

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