Origami tessellations book pdf


 

Eric Gjerde - Origami Tesselation - Download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online. Origami. Origami Tessellations Awe-Inspiring Geometric Designs. Uploaded by Origami Wrapping Workshop Book by Tomoko Fuse. Uploaded. Eric Gjerde Origami Tessellations PDF - Free download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) Information on the origami book Origami Tessellations by Eric Gjerde. Paper Geometry from Lark Books, which features all of the above and much more . Eric Gjerde [email protected] medical-site.info Aztec Twist.

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Origami Tessellations Book Pdf

Well, I had all the best intentions to add more content to this booklet – but it's hard for me not to just put in all the material from my book! So I'm. Origami tessellations are made from a single piece of paper, which is folded in a An understanding of the geometry of tessellations and of paper folding is. Download the PDF - Origami Tessellations. medical-site.info Views. 3 years ago. Pleat, · Tessellations, · Pleats, · Origami, · Folded, · Ousa, · Grid, · Folds.

Work your way around the central hexagon twist, repeating the pleating and intersecting steps until you have completed all six sides see photo 4. The crease pattern reflects this design. Where the pleats from your first intersection and your second one meet, make a degree pleat intersection see photo 3 showing the back side of the piece. See an extended version of the Star Twist tessellation on page in the Gallery section. Til' Don't force the paper. Gentle encouragement and light folding create better origami than does brute force. INCi o On a trip to Rome, the designer happened upon a gorgeous tiling pattern on an ancient church floor. Inspired by her discovery, Christiane Bettens makes use of numerous triangle twists and double pleats in this pattern. Treat the triangle twist itself as one of the pleats, essentially. Rather than having a single pleat-extending out from the corner of the triangle twist, you will have two pleats running degrees apart from each other away from the triangle twist, creating double pleats between the triangle twists see photo 2.

Many people have contributed to this art form's development, including the computer scientist Ron Resch, prolific origami author Yoshihide Momotani, and artist Chris Palmer.

Not long after spending six months living in the caves of Sacremonte outside of Granada, Spain, on an artistic journey to study the tilings of the Alhambra, Palmer was exposed to the tessellations of Fujimoto. Building on Fujimoto's work, Palmer has pushed the art of origami tessellations upward and outward. He is one of the greatest tessellation folders today, and many tessella- tion artists count Palmer among their primary influences.

The three tiling patterns are formed with single, repeating shapes: equilateral triangles, squares, and hexagons. Often these patterns are referred to as the 3. Separating numbers by periods is a common way of describing regular and semiregular tessellations by the number of corners of the shapes surrounding a given single intf - :ting point, or vertex.

Because the regular tessel- latiollS are created from a single shape, their naming is relatively straightforward.

In semiregular tessellations, the types of shapes differ, but patterns still are based on the arrangement of shapes around a single point. For any given point in the tessel- lation, the same shapes must be present and arranged in the same order.

Three very common examples used in origami tessellations are the 3.

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Origami tessellations often follow one of these six tessellation geometries by employing a sheet of paper precreased with a geometric grid.

S Origami tessellations require very little in the way of materials or tools-only a sheet of paper and your hands are needed. So, the starter kit is pretty basic! Not all papers are created equal, however. Because origami tessellations are made from many creases and folds, the paper you choose needs to be capable of handling all this activity without cracking or falling apart.

The best paper meets three criteria: 1. The paper is flexible enough to work easily. The paper holds a crisp crease line.

The paper does not crack or tear when creased repeatedly. Many regular wood-pulp papers fall short of the mark.

They are prone to falling apart, because wood-pulp papers are made with short fibers. Although you still can create fantastic art with wood-pulp paper, choosing a better quality paper will make a big difference in the final results of your folding, as well as the overall ease of your work.

A variety of papers will serve you well. The most impor- tant thing is to find a paper you're comfortable folding and that suits your folding style as it develops. Try out different kinds of paper, and discover which one works best for you. Mulberry A large selection of papers is made from the fibrous bark of the mulberry tree. Mulberry fibers are long, which lends great strength to the paper and also allows it to be made in very thin sheets.

Mulberry paper includes varieties with names like washi, unryu, and saa. All the mulberry papers require some preparation before folding, because they are soft and flexible. Lay the paper on a flat surface, such as a glass table, and spray it with a heavy spray starch normally used for ironing dress shirts.

Press the paper flat and work out any bubbles. Let it dry. This treatment will create a stiff, crisp paper that still folds easily. Lokta Made from the inner bark of the Daphne plant of Nepal, lokta paper has a soft, silken texture that makes it a plea- sure to fold. Lokta has a natural ivory color, but often it is dyed with subtle or wild patterns. I: Instructions Using a triangle grid of 48 divisions or larger, preferably cut into a hexagonal shape, create a hexagon twist in the center of the grid.

Fold another degree pleat intersection along the next pleat radiating out from the central hexagon twist. As with other patterns, th is rad iating pleat w ill intersect with the first one, and they won 't fold f lat easily. Refer to the crease pattern for o specifiC crease locations. Repeat the process for the remaining five sides of the central hexagon.

When you've folded all six sides, you have completed one tessellating unit of the design see photo 4. The pattern can repeat infinitely, of course. The crease pattern reflects the spacing for the design shown in the finished piece.

But by changing the spacing between flowers, you can experiment with different results! The tessellation is tricky to fold, requires deep patience, and rewards with a dancing, intricate result. Employ the degree inverted pleat intersection method to invert each pleat extending from the central hexagon twist.

The result is a hexagon twist with pleats extending outward from each corner-often called a "petal fold. The triangle twist should touch the corner of the central hexagon twist see photo 1. The second triangle twist will have pleats that intersect with the first twist and so won't lie flat. To solve this problem, unfold the first triangle twist a bit, and fold another triangle twist directly connected to it.

While origami is labor-intensive, it's also very relaxing.

Tessellation Basics booklet now available – free PDF!

Often when I fold something I lose track of time. Hours pass without my knowledge. When I'm finished, the completed piece is almost like a present. When I teach students how to create tessellations, they always have an "Aha! They suddenly, unexpect- edly understand how the folded shapes repeat themselves and how they all work together.

From that point on the students take off and start folding madly. Three words of warning: Tessellations are addictive! Don't worry if your first project comes out imperfectly; your next attempt will be greatly improved. Your own "Aha! Practice and repetition are great teachers. As your skill and experience increase, you'll start to see tessellation patterns everywhere.

Tiles on the floor, cobble- stones in the courtyard, the patterns of light falling through a stained-glass window-you'll find inspiration all around you.

You may find discovery and creation are the most rewarding parts of this craft, because making origami tessellations is very much about infinite possibility. When you draw upon your newfound recognition of patterns and think about how they might be recreated in paper, you can use the techniques in this book to create amazing arrange- ments and artwork all your own.

The tiles you saw likely created tessellations-repeating patterns of specific shapes. While the Romans and Byzantines made complex mosaic patterns, tessellations were raised to a true art form by artisans of the Islamic faith.

Download the PDF - Origami Tessellations

Since Islam forbade repre- sentational imagery, artists and craftsmen focused their creativity on developing complex geometric designs. Their geometric orientation was reflected in inspiring architec- ture, tile work, painting, ceramics, and illustration. The Islamic Moors in Spain built the Alhambra, a magnificent palace decorated with some of the best tessel- lation artwork in the world.

The Dutch artist M. Escher made several visits to the Alhambra. The complex tessellation patterns he studied had a formative impact on his art. Escher said the tiling at the Alhambra was "the richest source of inspiration I have ever tapped. Tessellations are an impor- tant part of many of his sketches and illustrations, which feature fantastic animals, figures, and shapes. Tessellated origami pieces range from simple square tilings to extremely intri- cate, complex pieces inspired by Islamic art.

Tessellated shapes can form everything from twisted architectural flourishes to realistic faces. Tessellating Birds by David Bailey Today's origami tessellations are primarily the brain- child of Shuzo Fujimoto, a Japanese chemistry teacher who was instrumental in exploring the possibilities of folding repeating shapes on paper.

Fujimoto's singular focus on origami tessellations continues to inspire many folders. Most of the basic tessellation ideas covered in this book were discovered by Fujimoto-sensei in the s. Many people have contributed to this art form's development, including the computer scientist Ron Resch, prolific origami author Yoshihide Momotani, and artist Chris Palmer.

Not long after spending six months living in the caves of Sacremonte outside of Granada, Spain, on an artistic journey to study the tilings of the Alhambra, Palmer was exposed to the tessellations of Fujimoto. Building on Fujimoto's work, Palmer has pushed the art of origami tessellations upward and outward. He is one of the greatest tessellation folders today, and many tessella- tion artists count Palmer among their primary influences.

Tessellation Basics booklet now available – free PDF! – Origami Tessellations

The three tiling patterns are formed with single, repeating shapes: Often these patterns are referred to as the 3. Separating numbers by periods is a common way of describing regular and semiregular tessellations by the number of corners of the shapes surrounding a given single intf -: Because the regular tessel- latiollS are created from a single shape, their naming is relatively straightforward.

In semiregular tessellations, the types of shapes differ, but patterns still are based on the arrangement of shapes around a single point. For any given point in the tessel- lation, the same shapes must be present and arranged in the same order. Three very common examples used in origami tessellations are the 3. Origami tessellations often follow one of these six tessellation geometries by employing a sheet of paper precreased with a geometric grid.

S Origami tessellations require very little in the way of materials or tools-only a sheet of paper and your hands are needed. So, the starter kit is pretty basic! Not all papers are created equal, however. Because origami tessellations are made from many creases and folds, the paper you choose needs to be capable of handling all this activity without cracking or falling apart. The best paper meets three criteria: The paper is flexible enough to work easily.

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