The King of Torts book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. The office of the public defender is not known as a training g. The King of Torts () is a legal/suspense novel written by American author John Grisham. . Print/export. Create a book · Download as PDF · Download as PDF · Printable version. John Grisham is fond of numbers, mostly big ones - big numbers, broad brushstrokes and tight plotting. Whether he's still fond of lawyers, the law and legal thrillers is another matter. Grisham said of the novel: "There is not a single lawyer, dead or alive, in this story.

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King Of Torts Book

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER The Office of the Public Defender is not known as a training ground for bright young litigators. Clay Carter has been there . Clay Carter has worked in the Office of the Public Defender for years for low pay when he defends another murderer. But the murderers are not what they seem. Grisham continues to impress with his daring, venturing out of legal thrillers entirely for A Painted House and Skipping Christmas (the.

Ever seen those ads on TV where the actor playing the lawyer looks at you straight in the eye and appeals to you," If you or a loved one, has taken this medication Or where those lawyers get that research on which pharmaceutical companies? Do the regular average Joes actually get their money? Yes, but the lawyer is the one who profits. The fine small print at the bottom of the forms says that the lawyer gets a third of your settlement. And a third from the other thousands of clients.

Jul 23, Jerry B rated it did not like it. A really lousy book: We've read every Grisham offering, including his two non-legal- thrillers, and find most of his novels to be good or great, a couple just so-so. For the first time, we'd rate this one at the bottom of the barrel. It has virtually no plot: Getting th A really lousy book: His efforts to land a third big score suddenly fail, then his second case starts to backfire, and by the end of the book, which just goes away with little fanfare, he's declaring bankruptcy and going away to hide.

Grisham does manage to generate a little suspense with the two or three big middle cases, but when the last big one fails, he doesn't even share with us readers a shard of logic to explain it, leaving us not merely feeling hollow, but feeling cheated by all the time we spent reading this junque. The point of the whole book eludes us, unless it's really just an attack against tort lawyers -- a group easy to hate based on the goings-on herein.

Speaking of money, we probably don't want to know what Grisham earned for this outing, but in some minds, he seems as guilty of cheating as his hero inside the covers. Sounds great right? This seemed like an implausible plot, even for a John Grisham book. I love a good Grisham book, especially when I haven't read one in awhile. This is the story of Clay Carter, a young lawyer in Washington DC, working for the public defender's office.

His job pays him next to nothing, his 4-year relationship is in a rut, and he'd love to live on his own--without a roommate. After wrapping up a lengthy murder trial, he gets stuck with another one. The man explains to Clay that his defendant was on a drug called Tarvan, which was amazing at cleaning up junkies had one serious problem-- after about a week of being off the drug, some of it's users had the uncontrollable urge to kill--totally at random.

The drug company was now asking Clay to pay the victims' families and Clay a substantial sum of money to keep the story quiet. Clay agrees-- and so begins his slippery journey with big pharmaceuticals and mass cases. Clay finds himself suing a large company for a bad drug-- all with the help of this mysterious man who has befriended him. When he becomes a multi-millionaire overnight, the smell of money and his greed only increase. He is hailed as the "King of Torts" and instantly thrown into the spotlight.

He downloads houses and jets and big boats. He becomes even more greedy and careless, and ultimately winds up with next to nothing. Grisham always does a great job of weaving together several stories and making his characters very life-like.

It's impossible not to root for Clay, even though we see his personality shift throughout the story. Jul 12, Ralph Gallagher rated it liked it.

It really took me a while to get into this book. It started out pretty slow, but it was interesting. I kept reading, and I'm pretty disappointed with the novel. His job is going no where, his girlfriend and her parents are after him to "make something of himself" which translates into "make our daughter rich. Then he meets Max Pace. The guy pops up out of n It really took me a while to get into this book. How can Clay say no? And thus, Clay Carter enters the world of Mass Torts.

The main character really didn't appeal to me. He was a guy who had a fortune handed to him, blew it all on stupid shit, made stupid decisions, and basically screwed himself, and yet still comes out unscathed. Through out the novel, I kept finding myself wanting to smack Clay for the stupid things he does. I would've liked the novel more if it had focussed more on Tequila rather than a greedy man blowing money left and right. May 19, Jake rated it it was ok Shelves: I don't think I'll ever read Grisham again, his stories are just too stupid.

The protagonist inexplicably acted like an ass despite professing to being a moral person, acted wildly irrationally, made unbelievable errors in judgement concerning the wasting of money and lack of caution.

His character was so poorly developed that I knew mid way through that I didn't give a shit what happened to him, because his character was both unbelievable and ultimately not likeable.

Most problematic though wer I don't think I'll ever read Grisham again, his stories are just too stupid. Most problematic though were what felt like serious inconsistencies in his behaviour, it just never felt like he had a real personality. It wasn't like a good person was being corrupted by money, rather it felt like the author didn't know who the character was, the consequence of which was me often thinking 'why the fuck would a real person do that? The entire ride, in particular the relationship aspect of the story, was beyond belief.

Still gets two stars for being a page turner, and Grisham's writing is tidy and very approachable. Oct 19, Jonah rated it really liked it. The rise and fall of a public defense attorney turned hotshot lawyer, plus fun stuff about mass tort litigation for people like myself who know nothing about that world.

An entertaining, fast-paced read. Porque estoy enojada como para marcarlos. El personaje hizo esto, vio a tal persona, dijo tal cosa, y se fue a dormir. Ah, de vez en cuando piensa en su ex. Y el hijo de puta va. Un caso le va a salir mal, va a perderlo todo, se va a dar cuenta de que la plata no hace a la felicidad, vuelve a su antigua vida y obvio que la novia regresa, no hay duda de ello.

View all 8 comments. Mar 19, Alyson Larrabee rated it liked it. The beginning was pretty engaging. Clay, the main character, is a public defender and he's assigned a murder case that he's certain to lose. The author brings the reader into the scenes and experiences during this part of the book. Once the book gets going, though, the characters are superficial to the point of being stereotypes and tropes, and the book becomes a lesson on how torts and class action suits work.

It's also a pretty heavy-handed morality lesson. The author superficially sketches out Clay's relationship with his father and his ex-girlfriend. I wasn't really invested emotionally.

I didn't care what happened to whom. I did learn a lot about certain aspects of the law, however. A reader who was already familiar with torts and class action suits, or a reader who wasn't interested in learning some of the basics might get pretty bored.

Jun 24, Valyssia Leigh rated it it was ok Shelves: This book wasn't completely terrible, which is impressive considering the fact that the main character was a remarkably lively turd. I might've given it another star had Grisham not view spoiler [tacked on a feel good ending where his bigoted, greedy, arrogant horror show of entitled human detritus won the heart of the girl of his dreams and a fat stack of cash for ignoring the wrongful imprisonment of seven men of color, robbing countless victims of big pharma and bankrupting the economy of a This book wasn't completely terrible, which is impressive considering the fact that the main character was a remarkably lively turd.

I might've given it another star had Grisham not view spoiler [tacked on a feel good ending where his bigoted, greedy, arrogant horror show of entitled human detritus won the heart of the girl of his dreams and a fat stack of cash for ignoring the wrongful imprisonment of seven men of color, robbing countless victims of big pharma and bankrupting the economy of a small southern city.

El protagonista es un abogado que de repente se ve ante la posibilidad de ganar mucha cantidad de dinero y obviamente la toma. En un principio su personaje es retratado perfectamente, era tan interesante leer como su concepto de lo que es moral o no,va cambiando y como sus prioridades cambian al verse expuesto a este grupo de gente tan adinerada y derrochadora.

Un ejemplo perfecto de su cambio de mentalidad es su idea de los jet privados,era un cambio tan sutil y constante que aunque no me agradara el protagonista estaba sumergida completamente en su mente.

All in all, this book just didn't push my buttons, although I will admit it is well written enough. My problem was quite simply that I didn't care. I didn't care about our hotshot King of Torts, I found the entire concept of the torts to be vaguely unpleasant and the surrounding cast of characters weak.

The tort lawyers are greedy, selfish, wasteful and arrogant. The group that comes along with Clay to his new 'business' are cardboard cut outs and the two women are damn awful.

But at the heart of All in all, this book just didn't push my buttons, although I will admit it is well written enough. But at the heart of my issues with this book was the fact that I simply had no interest in the topic and Grisham fails to instill that interest in me.

Had the focus stayed on Tequila Watson and a fight for justice by the underdog whilst the tort lawyers try to make some cash as the playground bullies, that might well have truly hooked me.

Lots of things about jet planes and insane bonuses to staff follows.

Review: The King of Torts by John Grisham | Books | The Guardian

The underdog angle would have worked better for me. The King of Torts, read by Dennis Boutsikaris, is incredible fun. I read this after reading "Sycamore row", a much deeper and multi-layered novel, and despite the very different, almost light-hearted tone, and the much quicker pace maybe because of the abridged version , this is another fantastic read.

Yes there is not much character development, but I think that was a choice. The plot moves very fast, it has a great rhythm, and you learn about the world of class action torts in the process. While Sycamore is more about various types of lawyers, but at its core it focuses on the good that a great lawyer can do, King of Torts focuses on the bad that a greedy lawyer can do.

Oh, so bad. To society, to innocent people, and to other lawyers. And the great protagonist, as always with Grisham, is money: Sycamore is about money and its complex influence on many lives, Torts is about money and the destructive power of greed.

Read it, it's a great book.

The King of Torts

Feb 06, Christine Blachford rated it liked it. Clay Carter is in a lowpaid but moral job, until the opportunity arrives for riches and stardom. Style Of Writing: Overall Opinion: Good, probably not the best, but up to the usual Grisham standard. Recommended If: I thought this book and "Street Lawyer" focused on a few similar scenarios: It seemed to me that the author's political view was all over Street Lawyer and for that, I didn't care for the book.

However, this book actually made the Street Lawyer story look better in my opinion. At least in Street Lawyer, the author made the main character, a white lawyer, I thought this book and "Street Lawyer" focused on a few similar scenarios: At least in Street Lawyer, the author made the main character, a white lawyer, turn into a some kind of hero.

In this book, I feel like there were a few good suspense laid out, but they were somehow lost and forgotten. What happened to Max Price? What about Paul Watson? To end this book entitled "The King of Torts" with a story of him getting away with his reunited girlfriend didn't satisfy me at all. I can see why Grisham fans left bad reviews May 08, Bolortuya rated it it was amazing.

As a lover of legal thrillers, I try to read all of John Crisham's books. Life, Grisham seems to be saying, is a series of consumer choices.

For Clay, the choice is between marrying money or having principles, spoilt rich girlfriend or no girlfriend, country club meals or processed turkey.

Having just subpoenaed all the medical files from a drug rehabilitation centre where Tequila Watson was being treated, Clay gets a call. No, he gets the call; it's that key Grisham moment, the deal with the devil. He goes to meet the man in black, an ex-lawyer hired to solve problems for a vast pharmaceutical company which has just pulled a bad drug from the market - the kind of drug that makes ex-addicts kill.

What the company requires is a smart young lawyer to square the families of those killed, victims like Pumpkin. The problem with The King of Torts is that, having set up strong characters and revealed the conspiracy, Grisham seems to get bored.

A lawyer unto himself

But as a tale of Clay's greed, love and redemption, The King of Torts fails to convince. It's almost as if what really interests Grisham are the very elements he hasn't allowed himself enough space to develop.

Topics Books. He quits the OPD, sets up his own firm and settles the cases. In reward, Pace gives him a present—a mass tort case based on stolen evidence but worth tens of millions in fees. Clay lunges again, eventually winning over a hundred million in fees.

He is crowned by the press the new King of Torts, with enough money to hobnob with the other, venal-hearted tort royalty, to download a Porsche, a Georgetown townhouse and a private jet, but not enough to forget his heartache over the woman he loves, who dumped him as a loser right before his career took off. The tension is considerable throughout, and readers will like the gentle ending, but Grisham's aim here clearly is to educate as he entertains.

The King Of Torts

He can be didactic " 'Nobody earns ten million dollars in six months, Clay,' " a friend warns. It's ridiculous and obscene' " , but readers will applaud Grisham's fierce moral stance while perhaps wondering what sort of advance he got for this book as they cling to his words every step along the way of this powerful and gripping morality tale.

On sale Feb.

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