Karnas wife the outcasts queen ebook


 

less than the primary insult to the nervous system, is an essential part of our role as physicians The Man Who Mistook The Power of a Praying Wife. Karna's Wife: The Outcast's Queen ~ By Kavita Kane. Breaking. ebooks · How About a Sin Tonight? ~ By Novoneel Chakraborty · ebooks. download ebook Karna's Wife: The Outcast's Queen tells the extraordinary story of Karna, the unsung hero of the Mahabharata, through the eyes of his wife Uruvi.

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Karnas Wife The Outcasts Queen Ebook

Editorial Reviews. About the Author. Kavita Kane graduated from Fergusson College, Pune in Karnas Wife: The Outcasts Queen tells the extraordinary story of Karna, the unsung hero of . Just waiting to have the Surya Putra Karna's ebook. Karna's Wife: The Outcast's Queen is a splendid tale of Karna, the unsung hero of Mahabharata, told from Just waiting to have the Surya Putra Karna's ebook. Karna's Wife book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Karna's Wife: The Outcast's Queen tells the extraordinary story of Ka.

Are you also one of those who likes to watch video content? Watch new videos each week here! The Outcast Queen. Kavita Kane, an accidental author by self-admission, is prolific nevertheless. Her corpus of work, though not vast, carries on the recent, rather necessary trend of resuscitating the tales of marginal female characters from the Ramayana and Mahabharata. The main reason was fairly simple. By most accounts, they had ten sons together. His second wife, though scarcely mentioned in most versions and re-tellings, was called Supriya.

Physical assault in return for rejection. Very sacrosanct indeed. Next is Kunti. In this book, she is the kind of woman who calmly calls herself a whore, because the laws apparently claim it. And then goes on to say the same about her polyandrous bahu as well. All this because Karna cannot be wrong in a book written on him. Kavita Kane's Draupadi is a semi-lunatic, who cannot differentiate between love and oppression. Surprisingly she is also shown as a semi-bitch for being nitpicky about her husband.

I have to admit, that Kavita Kane is a tremendous feminist and supports "my life, my choice" see Uruvi, for instance only as long as the opponent is not Karna. Duryodhan, Shakuni and Dushasana are utterly wretched men in the book for doing all the same things that Karna does.

But then again, Karna is the hero, so he cannot be wrong, can he?

Karna's Wife: The Outcast's Queen - Kavita Kane - Google книги

That brings me to Arjuna. Kane's Arjuna is - no points for guessing - an unworthy hero in this book. He is a short-tempered, arrogant man who cannot take competition.

He doesn't molest women who reject him though like his rival Karna , but Kavita Kane mentions this only fleetingly, and avoids elaborating it, lest the reader's mind begins to admire Arjuna. Instead, she keeps the focus rather on how privileged a kid he is. As a warrior, Kane's Arjuna is good, but not good enough. Vyasa must have been a fool to have given him centre-stage, because as per Kavita Kane, Arjuna is just an overrated, vain guy who is singularly loved the most by his grandfather, teacher and everyone around out of royal princes in Hastinapur for apparently no virtue of his!

She does throw in his sincerity fleetingly, but doesn't let the moment last for long as PR head Uruvi slowly wrenches it out of everyone including Krishna, that Arjuna is indeed overrated and Karna is better. The only thing remaining was Krishna giving Karna the lessons of Bhagavad Gita and showing him Viswaroopam instead of Arjuna, but thankfully Bhagavad Gita comes under sensitive "religious" issues, and so cannot be tampered with easily.

The only portions I enjoyed were the parts where a Kshatriya Uruvi tries to navigate through her newly married Suta household post marriage observing their traditions and lifestyle, and the ending chapter, where Uruvi spends her last days as a healer. Basically, those portions which have nothing much to do with Mahabharata. Overall, read the book only if you are stranded in a lonely island with only this one book in your bag.

May 20, Nameeta rated it it was ok. Growing up, Sunday mornings were reserved for watching the Mahabharat on Doordashan and I remember Karna being on the side of the Kaurava's and overall not a very good person. But reading interpretations of the Mahabharat in recent times Karna seems to have been a character who was a victim of his circumstance so I was interested to learn more about him and his wife in this story fictional though it maybe.

I honestly did not have very high expectations but unfortunately even those failed to de Growing up, Sunday mornings were reserved for watching the Mahabharat on Doordashan and I remember Karna being on the side of the Kaurava's and overall not a very good person. I honestly did not have very high expectations but unfortunately even those failed to deliver. There were a few good things about the book and one of those is the main protagonist Uruvi.

It was quite refreshing to hear a feminist voice in the Mahabharat setting where most of the women were used as pawns and play things. But she was also extremely naive. A woman who was lost in her own love story and blind to the world and her husband's fault till it was too late. She also gets a little screechy and annoying at times. The story also shows that the Pandavas may not have always been right or good. And the same goes for the Kaurava's.

I wish the author had delved into Duryodhana and his family a little more. Kunti is portrayed as plain calculative and power hungry. I enjoyed the politics and the family history and dynamics. And then of course Karna. A man who was righteous but on the wrong side of the war. From the beginning Karna knew this but his friendship and loyalty to Duryodhana trumped everything for him. The author does wonder that if his birth had been acknowledged right at the start then maybe the war would not have happened.

But then the explanation given was that this was necessary for dharma to prevail, to learn what is right from wrong although I doubt any of the lessons learnt are applicable at this day and age. Now coming to what I did not like, the most important being that the story was way too long.

For the matter it tried to convey entirely too many pages were written. The editing could have been better and so could have been the story telling. The narrative has too many flash backs which are not incorporated well. Also the same rehashing of how great Karna was was not needed in every other chapter.

Also the dialogues spouted but the characters was just plain annoying at times. Though it could have been much better overall not worth the time spent reading it Oct 10, Prajakta Athavale rated it did not like it. Makes Palace of Illusion seem like a work of pure literature.

This is just an author indulging herself by creating a fictional Karna's wife just to retell a very twisted version of Mahabharata with some added commentary to suit the non-existing plot.

It lacks depth, insights and any internalization of events or people and is peppered with a slew of heavy dialogues with distorted facts to make Karna the hero. Karna is the perfect anti-hero with forty shades of imperfection, which is the most Zero. Karna is the perfect anti-hero with forty shades of imperfection, which is the most appealing quality of his character. Kane killed it by glossing over the bad and the ugly while gilding the good.

I wish instead, we had spent more time on Vrushali who was actually Karna's wife and not this fictional female. Last but not the least, it was despicable the way the author equated Draupadi's disrobing with the public rejection of Karna during the swayamwar to justify Karna's actions. Sexual assault and verbal assault can never cancel each other out.

Feb 08, Ishani rated it it was ok. She was a mere spectator like us. With or without Uruvi in picture, with or without her marrying Karna, the course of Mahabharata stays the same. So retelling Mahabharata from her perspective in a book other than Mahabharata itself is very futile and boring. Having said that, the writing style is not that impressive. The book starts with the intention of introducing each and everyone wherever possible with a subtitle: Dhritarashtra, the blind king or Kunti, mother of the mighty Pandavas and widow of king Pandu followed by a flashback on what happened to them before.

It makes the readers feel very weary. And as the story progresses the author keeps on injecting short stories telling Mahabharata in every context. The beginning looks like a love story but later on is a series of endless discussions between Uruvi and others from Mahabharata, each time repeating the same things and events over and over.

The interesting parts of Mahabharata could actually have been elaborated more and the unnecessary parts could have been avoided. Kunti, Gandhari or lesser researched characters like Vidur or Dhritarashtra would have been an amazing choice! Jan 06, Rahul Prabhu rated it it was amazing.

Brilliant book! This book is a great example of things told from a different points of view sound very different. The depth given to the non-central characters like Kunti, Shakuni, Bhishma, and Duryodhana is exceptional. I especially loved the way the author has portrayed the other side of Kunti who is traditionally seen as a positive character. The character central to the plot of course is Karna's wife 'Uruvi'.

The author has in a very sensitive way explained what Uruvi goes through by marrying Brilliant book! The author has in a very sensitive way explained what Uruvi goes through by marrying Karna - the chivalrous, generous, just and the highly skilled brave warrior who is regarded by many as the greatest warrior of Aryavrata but is also looked down upon by the majority because of his low birth.

This book has not only brought out the various emotions that Uruvi goes through as the wife of one of the most complicated characters in the Mahabharata but has also explained the phenomenon of Karna. When we look at Mahabharata from the traditional angle, we see skill, glory, bravery and victory.

We often fail to see the other side of it which is tragedy, helplessness, and grief. This book does a very good job of bringing forth this view. After reading this book, I've realized that Mahabharatha can be looked at from many points of view and each teaches you something. Aug 24, Moumita Roy rated it it was amazing. Through this Tagore has picturised the conversation between Karna And Kunti when Kunti opened her dark secret to him. There was a particular one Question in my mind , later I found his Wife also had this question.

Did Karna Love Draupadi? Karna himself had answered it! I wanted to say more about Karna only , but Uruvi , attracted my mind towards her.

The brave lady. Where Draupadi had immense hunger of revenge Uruvi didn't love the idea of war. She wanted peace. If you have already seen my previous stories, you know then how much I love the writing style of kavitakane. Mar 14, MidnightOil rated it did not like it. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It sounded very promising, not to mention tantalizing, as it would mean a close and romantic look at Karna!

But alas! There were too many editing mistakes to count, the language was pedestrian at best, and the story meandered like a directionless blind drunkard! In fact its never mentioned! Her qualities are taken and given to Uruvi, leaving a very strange, almost alien-like creature in her place.

I reread that part to be sure I had read it correctly! It was surreal. And lo and behold! Kane delivers the next gem! Yes, you read that right.

My expectations from the book had plummeted past zero by this time, so I continued reading to see just how bad it could get. Kane took it as a challenge, it seems, and switched her soul with Uruvi. When the book ended I was almost sorry, because I had so gotten used to the convoluted nonsense of it.

Bad books make me angry, but this one was so bad it made me laugh with tears running down my cheeks. If Karna were to come alive he would be in a dilemma; should he just kill himself or marry this woman who obviously loves him very much and then kill himself for her bad writing!

I would vote for killing himself right away to save him the torture of reading this book. Karna has long been the character who evokes the greatest sympathy from thousands of readers who lose themselves to the tale of the Mahabharata. For me personally, he has been the unsung hero - the wronghed one, the one who despite being the instigator of the shame of Draupadi and the willing participant in Abhimanyu's brutal killing.

So to be the book that almost makes me cringe with annoyance at the man, is some feat. The book leads us to believe for the most part that Karna is a man with lovin Karna has long been the character who evokes the greatest sympathy from thousands of readers who lose themselves to the tale of the Mahabharata.

The book leads us to believe for the most part that Karna is a man with loving even if adoptive parents, a brother who looks up to him as his hero, two wives - one who is his friend and confidante and the other the narrator of this book the rouser of his passions, friends who remained steadfastly loyal and respected him for his skill and talent without paying much heed to his lineage - and yet cannot look beyond the fact that a few people who he has no reason to attach importance to till much later when the truth is revealed - call him sutaputra.

He sounds whiny. And despite his wife and everyone else insisting he is righteous, on specific occasions mentioned afore, he but loses any right to be referred so. Thankfully, the revelation of his birth and his determination to remain steadfastly loyal to his friend, the unfairness of what his birth mother and Krishna himself ask of him, didn't fail to restore some of my sympathy. This is arguably the weakest perspective on the saga that I have had the chance to read.

The author and therefore her lead protagonist make for a dull reading with tons of repetition even of phrases and events and any active engagement. Uruvi while modeled as to Karna what Draupadi was to Arjuna and vice versa, lacks the benefit of the richness of interactions with the mysterious Krishna, the Dharma-abiding often infuriating Yudhishthira, the soft-hearted brute that is Bhima and so many others from the tale.

In comparison to Draupadi, she comes across as highly uni-dimensional - a woman who loves her husband to the end of the world and has nothing more to say other than how wrong he was in his choices and how wronged he was in his destiny. Apr 01, Ashma rated it it was ok.

The only thing that compelled me to finish this book is the 'different perspective' of Mahabharat. It is an intriguing experience. Nevertheless, I cannot ignore how the conversation between the characters in this novel go-horrible, cheesy and extremely hard to digest.

KARNA’S WIFE The Outcast’s Queen

How I loathe the beginning of this novel itself! A desperate woman attracted by Karna's glowing armor. How she claims she 'loves' him and The only thing that compelled me to finish this book is the 'different perspective' of Mahabharat. How she claims she 'loves' him and repeats annoyingly throughout the novel while Karna doesn't even know she exists in the very beginning! And that conversation of newlywed couples after the dramatic Swayamvar though! Wish it could have been better.

The revelation of Karna's birth and the events followed always gets me! The ending of this epic battle always gets me. Sep 14, Gayathri rated it it was ok Shelves: Karna's Wife is a misleading title. The sole focus of the story is Karna. There is not one dialogue that isn't spoken about Karna or the other men who litter the pages of Mahabharata. The narrative also keeps moving back and forth. And the author uses various characters to pronounce lengthy monologues to explain the various boons and curses at play.

This often le Karna's Wife is a misleading title. This often leads to a loss of complexity for the reader is led straight to the answer instead of having it slowly revealed. Disappointing read. Mar 07, Srividya rated it it was amazing Shelves: Excellent book. Told from a wife's pov, it was extremely superb. Some of the scenes as well as the moments literally brought tears to your eyes.

Mahabharata has always been my favorite epic and Karna my favorite character, given his multiple shades.

Why I Was Disappointed With Kavita Kane’s “Karna’s Wife: The Outcast’s Queen”

To see his story told from his wife's pov was simply wonderful. Made you realise that life is not all black and white and there are shades of grey in everyone. Jul 01, Lakshmi rated it it was ok. I didn't like the read. Impressed by her other books like Menaka's Choice and Lanka's Princess, I was intrigued to read this.

Moral of the story is No matter how good and righteous a person is, if he sides with the wrong then he will be doomed come what may! This can be put in a very simple way with unnecessary discussions. I liked the way how story was built but this book tested my patience with never ending and painfully prolonged conversations between characters.

Jan 09, A H rated it it was ok Shelves: DNF'd at page May 11, Anj seaweed books rated it liked it. After the abomination that was the T. V serial 'Karnsangini' which was loosely based on this book, I was a bit hesitant going into it but I soon realized that the book was completely different and way better than the typical 'saas-bahu' drama the makers of the serial had turned it into.

Don't scoff. I had to give the show a shot. That comparison, however, does no good when you look at the book individually. This book is supposed to be a retelling of the Mahabharata through the eyes of Uruvi, Karn After the abomination that was the T.

This book is supposed to be a retelling of the Mahabharata through the eyes of Uruvi, Karna's wife, if you hadn't guessed from the title already. Uruvi's character has substance but once she marries Karna, her character just turns into another convenient way of narrating Karna's story. Agreed that Uruvi is never mentioned in the original Mahabharata, but it is vital that the readers understand the turmoil the character is going through.

The story has to revolve around the main character, who happens to be Uruvi in this case. It focused more on Karna. I've read 'Sita's Sister' one of Kavita Kane's other books and there, the third person narrative was very aptly used.

Not so much. This book offers a good portrayal of Karna, a man who was righteous, yet aided adharma throughout his life. Just a person present at the wrong place at the wrong time aiding the wrong people.

Again, the vastraharan scene becomes a moot point. This was the part where Uruvi was furious regarding Karna openly insulting Draupadi in the Rajysabha. I talked about my issue with Uruvi being turned into a link who very conveniently connected the different incidents in the story, but one fact can't be denied. Her arguments were all so solid, precise and more importantly, fierce.

Kunti, however disappointed me by justifying all the wrong things. Kavita did a great job offering arguments against the wrongdoings of Karna through one of the characters. In such retelling of the epics, it becomes mandatory to include strong opinions on injustices done to several characters, something I found to be abundant in this book, which is a good thing.

Only when I was reading this book did I finally realise how very calculated the steps taken by the characters were. None of them, including Karna, were perfect. Each one had a role to play in the events that lead to the war. That's exactly why I'm drawn to this epic and I'll never get tired of reading the story from the perspective of different characters. I would have given this book a higher rating had it treated Uruvi as more than a person who was there for the sole purpose of making valid arguments and a source of commentary.

This was not what I expected it to be, but insightful nonetheless. Oct 17, Aditi rated it it was amazing. I saw this book at a book store and I just couldn't take my eyes of it.

The name and the cover of the book was literally stuck in my head. I decided to download the book later, but in those days I couldn't stop myself from thinking about the book and Urvi.

When I read the book I realised that there are many characters in Mahabharata that have played a very vital role in the war but have never been in the limelight. The story is about A Kshatriya princess, Urvi who gets married to Karna,the son of I saw this book at a book store and I just couldn't take my eyes of it.

The story is about A Kshatriya princess, Urvi who gets married to Karna,the son of the Surya and Kunti but was abandoned by the mother at the time of the birth and later adopted by a lowly charioteer. The story revolves around how Urvi struggled and fought against the society for her love for Karna. It also shows that the right and Wrong is actually the same side of the coin and it all depends on how we understand the situation. I couldn't not help but just admire Urvi for what she had been through all her life.

Jan 01, Shinrinyoku rated it did not like it Shelves: This book is horrible. Uruvi kept supporting Karna even though he was wrong. And he shouldn't have been forgiven for the Vastraharana incident. No one should be forgiven neither the Pandavas nor the Kauravas or the so-called elders.

I found the following message on WhatsApp and it's so brilliant that I've decided to post it here. I recently heard about a TV Serial based on this book and decided to give it a shot. This novel is golden compared to that show. The show bears no similarity to book other than adding Uruvi in the mix. Arjun is portrayed as a spoiled prince which isn't wrong because of his upbringing but he does have morals which Karn seriously lacks.

Most in the show keep singing praises of Karna even when he is at fault. He is downright arrogant, rude and his attitude begs to give him a good thrashing. Uruvi is shown as a charioteer, is extremely preachy and thinks she and Karn can do no wrong.

I stopped watching after watching 12 episodes. Please don't watch it. Jan 06, Raja Subramanian rated it it was amazing Shelves: Retelling a known story comes with its own advantages and disadvantages. It appears to me that there are more challenges in attempting to retell a known story than in telling one's own original story. When retelling a known story, the inevitable comparisons spring up sometimes shadowing the inherent ability to simply enjoy the story. Watch new videos each week here!

The Outcast Queen. Kavita Kane, an accidental author by self-admission, is prolific nevertheless. Her corpus of work, though not vast, carries on the recent, rather necessary trend of resuscitating the tales of marginal female characters from the Ramayana and Mahabharata. The main reason was fairly simple. By most accounts, they had ten sons together. His second wife, though scarcely mentioned in most versions and re-tellings, was called Supriya. Such a portrayal of a woman heavily silenced in the classical epic, hardly does any service to the way she is memorialised.

From the little that one can glean about Vrushali, through the Mahabharata, she certainly has a story to be told. She lost her husband through an act of unfair war practice. Vrushali was the wife of a man, who, blinded by rage and a desire for revenge, had encouraged Draupadi to be disrobed publicly.

This narrative manoeuvre not only makes Vrushali invisible again, but also paints her, at times, as a jealous co-wife, dependent on a young brother-in-law to make a case for her. We hear nothing of her personal emotional crisis. The only other person this novel pays tribute to, is Karna himself. Believes in humanity and spreading smiles Karna's Wife: A lot has been written on the Mahabharata.

From various perspectives, each author telling the story of one central character. Uruvi — the central character in this novel speaks of Karna — the unsung hero.

She also speaks of herself, of her relationships with his family, and the way he is. The writing is crisp and to the point in most parts, while in others, the description is too much to handle. Kane has a keen eye of the incidents that occurred in the Mahabharata and weaves in her story quite cleverly in the narrative.

Historical fiction is not written a lot in the country as it should. Books such as these will sure change the trend. A must read to not only know more about the epic battle but also a different point of view. A classic retelling of the Mahabharata from the unique perspective of Karna's wife Uruvi, who is witness to the twists and turns of Karna's fate and his role in the Divine plan.

Published in , Karna's Wife: The Outcast's Queen is a unique novel in the genre of magic realism that tells parts of the Mahabharata through the eyes of Uruvi, the wife of Karna, who is the unsung hero of the Epic tale. The novel begins with her story, an accomplished Kshatriya princess who chooses Karna, the 'sutaputra', over Arjun, an antithesis of Draupadi's choice.

A bright, witty and intelligent women completely in love with Karna, the novel traces her struggles and travails, coming to terms with Karna's socially inferior position and her own title as the 'Outcast's Queen'. How she uses her wit and intelligence to be accepted into his family is evocatively demonstrated. Slowly, she becomes Karna's mainstay, the one he comes to for advice and solace, and yet, she is helpless in the face of his wilful and blind obedience to Duryodhana. She stands behind him and is his true support when the entire world had turned against him, through a series of cruel misfortunes and turns of fate.

The entire story of Karna and Uruvi unfolds against the larger backdrop of the Kurukshetra war between the Pandavas and the Kauravas. Karna's character is also deeply fleshed out, his role as a son, father, husband, friend, warrior and devotee. Uruvi is a silent witness to the strength and valour of Karna, his immeasurable love for Krishna and the unfortunate end he meets with.

The novel has received good reviews from readers around the world as being a unique recasting of an old story in a fresh and new form.

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