PDF | 50 minutes read | In recent years, sustainability concept has become The Concept of Green Architecture, also known as “sustainable. Green architecture. Strategic fields for saving or rational utilization of green buildings – material, energy and water resources. Trends in the. The Concept of Green Architecture, also known as "sustainable architecture" or .. to green the built” medical-site.info

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Green Architecture Pdf

Green medical-site.info - Download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or view presentation slides online. Green Architecture. Green Building – Guidebook for Sustainable Architecture Interview with the Architect Hadi Teherani of BRT Architects, Hamburg Interview with Christian . When it comes to the term “Green Buildings,” we may just define it as a special kind of building without knowing the details and background behind it. Actually.

It should also be a complimentary addition to a community that is both socially and environmentally sustainable. The sustainable building must not only meet basic needs for food, shelter, education, work, income and safe living and working conditions, but also ensuring that it provides equity, accessibility, and a fair distribution of the benets of development across the residents and community as a whole. Green Buildings aspects : the use of local materials and indigenous building materials; incentive to promote the continuation of traditional techniques, with regional resources and self-help strategies; regulation of energy-efcient design principles; international information exchange on all aspects of construction related to the environment, among architects and contractors, particularly non-renewable resources; exploration of methods to encourage and facilitate the recycling and reuse of building materials, especially those requiring intensive energy use during manufacturing; and the use of clean technologies. Examples of denitions include that given by the Department of Architecture at Hong Kong University a leader in the development of sustainable building practices which denes the approach to green building as one that: involves a holistic approach to the design of buildings. The Green Building Council of the United States USGBC denes green sustainable building design or development as: a process to design the built environment while considering environmental responsiveness, resource efciency, and cultural land community sensitivity.

This requires a review of activities such as cleaning, irrigation, washing, ushing wastes and drinking to identify where use reductions can be made.

Opportunities for this may involve: Avoiding indoor and outdoor planting with high irrigation needs; Avoiding water features that have little indispensable amenity value; Incorporation of low water use appliances and xtures. Methods for achieving reductions in water consumption are further outlined below.

Identify site construction activities where potable water may be utilised, reduce the need for these activities or specify alternative grey water sources where possible e. Grey water from kitchen and food preparation areas should be separated from other sources of grey water, due to intrinsic difculties in removing oils and fats.

Many public and commercial facilities generate relatively small amounts of grey water; other types of commercial and industrial facilities may generate large quantities. For example, a vehicle cleaning areas and facilities that use large quantities of water to wash trucks can realize considerable savings by recycling wash water. Therefore, volume should be considered in deciding whether it is cost-effective to treat grey water and sewage separately.

Usually, irrigation with grey water is required to be subsurface. Factors affecting the mode of grey water irrigation systems include soil depth and characteristics as well as drainage and ooding patterns. Dual plumbing separates grey water from sewage.

Other books: GREEN FOR LIFE PDF

Dual plumbing is not difcult to install, but is mostcost effective if done during initial construction. If dual plumbing lines are not installed initially, adding a grey water treatment system later can be relatively expensive.

For this reason, install dual distribution lines in new facilities if a grey water system may be incorporated in the future. Utilize grey water for non-potable purposes. Recycle grey water via a dual distribution system, for such non-potable water uses as toilet ushing, thereby avoiding unnecessary use of high-quality potable water.

Another major use of grey water is for irrigation of areas such as golf courses and ornamental landscapes. A separate tank, lter, and special emitters are necessary in grey water irrigation systems. The water can be recycled for non-potable uses, reducing water consumption and overburdening of municipal treatment facilities. Sludge can either be taken off-site for disposal at appropriate facilities, or may be biologically digested at on-site facilities, potentially yielding exportable energy from production of methane.

As with grey water, incorporate segregated plumbing into design, isolating sewage from other wastewater systems. Utilize innovations such as low-pressure dosing systems in conjunction with septic tanks to overcome limitations of soil, geology, or topography.

Green Architecture: Design for a Sustainable Future | Journal of Design History | Oxford Academic

Consider solid separators, sand lters and aerobic tank treatment. Sand lters, a low-cost wastewater treatment technology, have been in use for many years. Aerobic tank systems offer advantages over traditional septic tanks, which do not use oxygen to treat waste. Consider aquaculture systems illustrated in Figure In aquaculture systems, wastewater becomes a source of food for plants and sh. In the process water is puried, as plants and sh ingest pollutants.

This type of system requires high management, but produces food and fertilizer in return. For example, both horizontal and vertical reed beds can be utilised for secondary and tertiary treatment of wastewater and can be integrated into landscaping of the site, depending on land availability.

The reed bed system utilises a system of sand and gravel of different grades, planted with local reed species.

Sustainable architecture

Harvested water can include storm water and irrigation runoff, water from cooling towers and air-conditioning systems, and other drainage structures directed into collection areas. After collection in a covered storage tank to reduce evaporation potential , harvested runoff must be pressurized in order to be used in an irrigation system. Design at roof spaces and paved pedestrian areas to collect rainwater runoff.

Water collected from car parks may not be suitable for reuse for purposes such as irrigation due to potential diesel and chemical content. The use of oil interceptors in car park drains may increase use potential from this source and minimise the need for further treatment. Utilize gravity ow to collect runoff into harvesting areas such as storage tanks, open ponds, or detention basins.

Direct rainfall from roofs and water from cooling towers into runoff harvesting areas. Designs should incorporate water metering systems which are accessible for review by site and facilities operators and users. Metering of different facilities and activities will also assist in identication of inefcient practices or appliances. In this manner, facility managers, operators or residents can monitor and audit water use and can be encouraged to introduce water saving measures.

Water leaks within a building or on a development can result in signicant losses and cost as a result of damage or the building and its contents becoming inoperable. Designs for water supply and discharge systems should incorporate leak detection systems to allow determination of location for repair. This should include both indoor and outdoor distribution networks.

Use planting schemes that incorporate either native species or well adapted drought tolerant plants, requiring little or no irrigation. Water at appropriate times of day i. Introduce watering below surface to reduce evapotranspiration.

Use salt tolerant plant species, which will allow the blending of sweet water, such as treated grey water and treated sewage efuent TSE , with brackish or saline water from the ground or sea. Students explore the fundamentals of project management and apply them to scenarios involving sustainable development.

Opportunities also exist in municipal, provincial and federal government offices concerned with building design and construction, real estate and facilities management. Learning Outcomes The graduate has reliably demonstrated the ability to: Assemble, analyze, adapt and appropriately apply technical data from architectural documents and related sources to complex contexts and documents.

Coordinate and facilitate the collection, processing, and interpretation of technical data related to green architecture projects. Communicate technical information effectively and accurately in a variety of modes. Assist in planning and designing green architecture projects. Use electronic technology to support architectural projects.

Analyze and solve technical problems related to green architecture projects using the principles of mathematics and science. Assess the environmental, social and economic impacts of architectural projects. Integrate civil, mechanical, structural and electrical disciplines into green architecture projects. Provide leadership in the planning and implementation of green architecture projects. Identify and apply discipline-specific practices that contribute to the local and global community through social responsibility, economic commitment and environmental stewardship.

Choose the site sensibly to lower the environmental impact. Select the site location to reduce transportation of materials and embodied energy during construction and operation. Decide on new sites that are near public roads network, bridges and highways to reduce loss of land, provide access to the new facility, and avoid extra cost of new roads.

Adaptive Buildings for Sustainable Architecture

Choose new site to minimise infrastructures required to support the facility operation. Select sites in urban and developed areas to ensure good building orientation. Decide on the site to be nearby or within the immediacy of water supply sources. Pick the sites that are nearby or within the immediacy of power distribution network to reduce demand on supply and resources but within the allowable limits to avoid risk.

Ensure that selected sites shall be within an acceptable good range to residential areas and other services to enable building users to reduce daily transportation and time. Ensure that the selection of sites has good link to good drainage systems and would not affect groundwater level. Avoid selecting sites that are nearby electrical transport medium or high voltage towers.

This requires a review of activities such as cleaning, irrigation, washing, ushing wastes and drinking to identify where use reductions can be made.

Opportunities for this may involve: Avoiding indoor and outdoor planting with high irrigation needs; Avoiding water features that have little indispensable amenity value; Incorporation of low water use appliances and xtures. Methods for achieving reductions in water consumption are further outlined below. Identify site construction activities where potable water may be utilised, reduce the need for these activities or specify alternative grey water sources where possible e. Grey water from kitchen and food preparation areas should be separated from other sources of grey water, due to intrinsic difculties in removing oils and fats.

Many public and commercial facilities generate relatively small amounts of grey water; other types of commercial and industrial facilities may generate large quantities. For example, a vehicle cleaning areas and facilities that use large quantities of water to wash trucks can realize considerable savings by recycling wash water. Therefore, volume should be considered in deciding whether it is cost-effective to treat grey water and sewage separately.

Usually, irrigation with grey water is required to be subsurface. Factors affecting the mode of grey water irrigation systems include soil depth and characteristics as well as drainage and ooding patterns.

Dual plumbing separates grey water from sewage. Dual plumbing is not difcult to install, but is mostcost effective if done during initial construction. If dual plumbing lines are not installed initially, adding a grey water treatment system later can be relatively expensive. For this reason, install dual distribution lines in new facilities if a grey water system may be incorporated in the future. Utilize grey water for non-potable purposes. Recycle grey water via a dual distribution system, for such non-potable water uses as toilet ushing, thereby avoiding unnecessary use of high-quality potable water.

Another major use of grey water is for irrigation of areas such as golf courses and ornamental landscapes. A separate tank, lter, and special emitters are necessary in grey water irrigation systems. The water can be recycled for non-potable uses, reducing water consumption and overburdening of municipal treatment facilities.

Sludge can either be taken off-site for disposal at appropriate facilities, or may be biologically digested at on-site facilities, potentially yielding exportable energy from production of methane. As with grey water, incorporate segregated plumbing into design, isolating sewage from other wastewater systems.

Utilize innovations such as low-pressure dosing systems in conjunction with septic tanks to overcome limitations of soil, geology, or topography.

Consider solid separators, sand lters and aerobic tank treatment. Sand lters, a low-cost wastewater treatment technology, have been in use for many years. Aerobic tank systems offer advantages over traditional septic tanks, which do not use oxygen to treat waste. Consider aquaculture systems illustrated in Figure In aquaculture systems, wastewater becomes a source of food for plants and sh.

In the process water is puried, as plants and sh ingest pollutants. This type of system requires high management, but produces food and fertilizer in return.

For example, both horizontal and vertical reed beds can be utilised for secondary and tertiary treatment of wastewater and can be integrated into landscaping of the site, depending on land availability. The reed bed system utilises a system of sand and gravel of different grades, planted with local reed species.

Harvested water can include storm water and irrigation runoff, water from cooling towers and air-conditioning systems, and other drainage structures directed into collection areas. After collection in a covered storage tank to reduce evaporation potential , harvested runoff must be pressurized in order to be used in an irrigation system. Design at roof spaces and paved pedestrian areas to collect rainwater runoff.

Water collected from car parks may not be suitable for reuse for purposes such as irrigation due to potential diesel and chemical content. The use of oil interceptors in car park drains may increase use potential from this source and minimise the need for further treatment. Utilize gravity ow to collect runoff into harvesting areas such as storage tanks, open ponds, or detention basins. Direct rainfall from roofs and water from cooling towers into runoff harvesting areas.

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