Developing flex 4 components pdf


 

Using Actionscript & Mxml To Extend Flex And Air Applications (Developer's Library) By Mike E. Jones pdf download. Developing Flex 4 Components: Using. Get Free Read & Download Files Developing Flex 4 Components Using Actionscript Mxml To Extend Flex An PDF. DEVELOPING FLEX 4 COMPONENTS . Developing Flex 4 Components Using Actionscript Mxml To Extend. Flex And Air PDF books which you could acquire as much knowledge as you would like.

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Developing Flex 4 Components Pdf

KINDLE PDF. Read Download Online Developing Flex 4 Components: Using Actionscript & Mxml To. Extend Flex And Air Applications (Developer's Library). medical-site.info Online Source Download and Free Ebook PDF Manual Reference. Developing-flexcomponents-using-actionscript-mxml-to-extend- flex. Developing Flex 4 Components: Using ActionScript & MXML to Extend Flex and Learning Flex 4: Getting Up to Speed with Rich Internet Application Design.

How to use Flash Builder to develop Flex applications, including creating projects, developing, building, testing, and debugging flex apps. Adobe Flash Builder, part of the Adobe Flash Platform, is a multimedia platform that utilizes browser plug-ins to deliver rich content via the web. Because it is built on Eclipse, Flash Builder 4 inherits an impressive list of plug-ins and is a familiar tool for many developers. The previous version of Flash Builder 4 was Flex Builder 3. Adobe changed the name for this release to avoid confusion between the open-source Flex framework and Flash Builder 4, which is a commercial IDE. This Refcard outlines how to use Flash Builder to develop Flex applications, including creating new projects in Flash Builder, Developing, Building compiling , Testing, and Debugging Flex applications. Flex Builder 3 and Flash Builder 4 can coexist on the same system. However, they cannot coexist as plug-ins in the same Eclipse install. If you have Flex Builder 3 installed as an Eclipse plug-in, you should uninstall it before installing the Flash Builder 4 plug-in, or install Flash Builder 4 standalone. Flash Builder 4 is a commercial product and must be downloadd from Adobe a day free trial is available.

When a project is created or opened, Flash Builder displays the main window, called the workbench. The workbench consists of a set of Views, Editors, and Toolbars. Views provide visual access to some part of your project. The initial views include the Package Explorer, Outline, Problems, and several others.

Editors allow you to edit the source files, and can be text based or visual. Toolbars provide easy access to commonly used menu items.

Effortless Flex 4 Development

Perspectives can be used to manage your workbench. A perspective is a collection of views and toolbars appropriate for a certain activity. Flash Builder provides two default perspectives, Flash and Flash Debug. You can modify these perspectives or define your own to customize the Flash Builder environment to your individual taste. Flash Builder 4 is built on Eclipse, and inherits many of its features and shortcuts. Flex applications consist of two different types of source files.

MXML files. ActionScript files. You can achieve the same functionality with either type of file, but they are tailored to different usages. ActionScript files are ideal for non-visual code, including model or service classes.

Altium Designer 14 - 3D Clearance Checking of Flex Mounted Components

Adobe Flash Catalyst is a tool that allows designers to easily create Flex applications from artwork created from the Adobe Creative Suite. Flash Builder provides tools to import Adobe Flash Catalyst projects.

For more information on Catalyst: You can switch back and forth between these modes while editing an MXML source file. This makes it easy to manage the visual layout using the designer while switching to the source view to add ActionScript and non-visual components.

Source mode provides an XML editor with robust code completion, syntax highlighting, and error highlighting. The figure below shows the MXML editor in source mode with the code completion pop-up open.

Design mode provides a visual preview of your application. This is very useful for laying out the components, or simply checking to see how they will look without running the application. The Design mode features a list of available components in the bottom left window.

You can drag and drop these onto your application to add them and adjust the layout. Each Flex container uses a specific layout to determine the size and position of the visual components. The Flex SDK provides four general-purpose layouts. Components can be configured using absolute or relative positioning.

BasicLayout allows absolution positioning, where components are assigned specific x and y coordinates. This mode allows pixel level control over the appearance of the application. However, it also has several drawbacks.

When using BasicLayout, users cannot usefully resize the application. It can also be very difficult to internationalize an application, as buttons and labels are often different sizes based on the language. VerticalLayout, HorizontalLayout, and TileLayout all provide different approaches to layout components using relative positioning.

Flex also provides a layout specifically for button bars skins ButtonBarHorizontalLayout. You can create your own Layouts by extending one of these layouts, or their base class, LayoutBase.

When you move beyond simple components and need to begin to create object models and complex logic, it is time to use the ActionScript editor. The ActionScript editor is a traditional source code text editor. The editor includes keyword highlighting, error highlighting, and provides a list of current problems Errors and Warning in the view at the bottom of the workspace.

The following figure shows a simple ActionScript class with two unresolved problems. Flash Builder provides code completion for many common scenarios.

Code completion can be triggered automatically based on context or manually, using Ctrl-Space. Code completion is automatically triggered after a period or colon, displaying either possible variable and property names, or available types. ActionScript is a dynamic language. Therefore, the code completion can only provide guidance for the statically known functions and properties.

There will be occasions when code completion will be unable to identify valid functions or properties. ActionScript is a relatively concise language, avoiding significant amounts of boilerplate code. However, there are still occasions where it is useful to have Flash Builder perform common code generation. Generate Service Call generates code to integrated with server classes when using Data Services. The following table provides a list of where and how these code generation functions can be invoked.

Flash Builder provides support for some basic refactoring. You can Rename variables and functions, and Rename or Move classes using the menu: These menu items will open a dialog box allowing you to specify the new name or location. Flash Builder supports integration with many different source control management tools. You can install an Eclipse Plug-in for the source control management tool you use. The Flash Builder Data Centric Development feature allows developers to quickly and easily connect Flex applications to a backend service.

To use the Data Centric Development feature, the project must be connected to a service. You can achieve the same functionality with either type of file, but they are tailored to different usages.

Creating Flex components

ActionScript files are ideal for non-visual code, including model or service classes. Flash Builder provides powerful editors for both types of source files. Flash Builder provides tools to import Adobe Flash Catalyst projects.

You can switch back and forth between these modes while editing an MXML source file.

This makes it easy to manage the visual layout using the designer while switching to the source view to add ActionScript and non-visual components.

Source mode provides an XML editor with robust code completion, syntax highlighting, and error highlighting. The figure below shows the MXML editor in source mode with the code completion pop-up open.

Design mode provides a visual preview of your application. This is very useful for laying out the components, or simply checking to see how they will look without running the application. The Design mode features a list of available components in the bottom left window. You can drag and drop these onto your application to add them and adjust the layout.

Each Flex container uses a specific layout to determine the size and position of the visual components. The Flex SDK provides four general-purpose layouts. Components can be configured using absolute or relative positioning. BasicLayout allows absolution positioning, where components are assigned specific x and y coordinates. This mode allows pixel level control over the appearance of the application.

However, it also has several drawbacks. When using BasicLayout, users cannot usefully resize the application. It can also be very difficult to internationalize an application, as buttons and labels are often different sizes based on the language. VerticalLayout, HorizontalLayout, and TileLayout all provide different approaches to layout components using relative positioning. There are a number of ways to create and populate an Array, the simplest being the use of square brackets.

Arrays are not typed; they simply hold Objects. However, you are not forced to downcast when pulling items out of an Array if the dynamic typing mechanism can handle the result. The textValue has both a get and set method, making it a property and allowing you to execute code when that property is changed. Here I've just assigned it to the text field for demonstration purposes. I've also added the onClick method which cycles the text field through the elements in the labelStates array.

The onClick method also accepts an event argument, which defaults to null so that it's optional—this allows it to be used as an event listener, as you'll see shortly. The assignment to textValue results in "Hello, World!

In order for click to be assigned to the onClick method, the MyLabel instance must have an object identifier, and thus, is given an id of display. The code assigned to click in the Button shows that you aren't required to just reference a function; you can define the code inline although this can rapidly become messy.

Here, you can add "Logical" to the list if it isn't already there. Events Everything in Flash is event-based, and as a programmer you can hook into either the framework-generated events or user-generated events.

If you want to insert some code at a particular point in the life cycle of an application, you must find the appropriate framework event, such as the creationComplete event, which happens after the application has been constructed there are many other framework events that you can look up in the online help system.

TIMER, display. This creates a Timer that generates The TimerEvent. TIMER events, which are tied to the display. The MyLabel instance is configured to call timer. In general, event handling is exactly this simple; note the succinctness of code when compared with Java event handling. Flex also provides data binding, which allows one component to respond to a change in the data of another component. This was seen as a common activity that would ordinarily require a lot of event-handling code, so the Flex designers decided to do the work for the programmer.

Every time the timer fires, count changes and the text field in the Label changes in response. This example also shows the use of an inline function a. Note: When you create inline code inside MXML like this, the compiler actually creates a class to hold the code and an instance of that class. Although this is convenient for small blocks of code it can become confusing if you try to make that code too large or complex, in which case you should move it to a separate ActionScript file.

Adobe Flex - EduTech Wiki

A programmed learning component I'll finish with a more sophisticated component that will also demonstrate the use of AIR to read local files from the disk. In addition, I'll explore more ActionScript syntax including regular expressions. This component was created to support the Flex Jams; in particular, for people who are using Flex for the first time and need step-by-step instructions. Programmed Learning is a fairly old practice; it focuses on learning through exercises and, instead of giving you the answer all at once, it guides you through by giving a series of hints and answers so that you get the sense of discovery and learning at every step.

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