The spy who came in from the cold book


 

With no operatives left, Leamas is recalled to London by Control, the Circus chief, who asks Leamas to stay "in the cold" for one last mission. The Spy Who Came In from the Cold book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. In this classic, John le Carre's third novel a. Compre The Spy Who Came in from the Cold: A George Smiley Novel (George Smiley Novels Book 3) (English Edition) de John le Carré na medical-site.info

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The Spy Who Came In From The Cold Book

Get all the key plot points of John Le Carré's The Spy Who Came in From the Cold on one page. From the creators of SparkNotes. Editorial Reviews. medical-site.info Review. It would be an international crime to reveal too much of the jeweled clockwork plot of Le Carré's first masterpiece, The . William Boyd explains why he keeps returning to Le Carré's great espionage novel 50 years after its first publication.

Email Address. It has won multiple awards and is regularly voted one of the top ten spy thrillers of all time. The Circus fires Leamas. He drinks heavily and causes trouble to build his cover as a disillusioned ex-spy. Then he gets a job at a library and meets Liz Gold, who is a Communist. They become lovers. This leads to Leamas coming to the attention of the East Germans and agreeing to defect to them. Leamas hints at British payments to a double agent in the Abteilung. Mundt [blackout]helps Leamas and Liz escape, telling them to drive to Berlin where his agent will help them get over the Wall. Liz is [blackout]horrified by the ruthless cynicism of the British action. Leamas could escape, but he decides to climb back down to be with Liz. The guards kill him. The Looking Glass War was one of his least popular novels — there is realism and then there is realism.

It has won multiple awards and is regularly voted one of the top ten spy thrillers of all time. The Circus fires Leamas. He drinks heavily and causes trouble to build his cover as a disillusioned ex-spy. Then he gets a job at a library and meets Liz Gold, who is a Communist. They become lovers. This leads to Leamas coming to the attention of the East Germans and agreeing to defect to them.

Leamas hints at British payments to a double agent in the Abteilung. Mundt [blackout]helps Leamas and Liz escape, telling them to drive to Berlin where his agent will help them get over the Wall. Liz is [blackout]horrified by the ruthless cynicism of the British action. Leamas could escape, but he decides to climb back down to be with Liz.

Leamas travels to The Hague, where he is interviewed by a Russian agent named Peters. Leamas tells Peters about how he first made contact with Karl Riemeck and about the intelligence Riemeck provided.

Peters is skeptical that Riemeck would have had access to so much information. Leamas learns from Riemeck that Elvira was killed in West Germany, which puzzles him.

The next day, Leamas tells Peters about a special system for paying an agent that he worked on while in the Banking Department.

In each city, he deposited money into a joint account for himself under an alias and an agent who could collect it under an alias. On the third day in Holland, Peters arrives late, so Leamas takes a walk on the beach.

He thinks about Liz and how she made him remember what it feels like to take pleasure in life. He hopes to return to her. Leamas accuses Peters of having revealed his defection to London to force him to stay, but he actually suspects that Control is behind this. Peters tells him he must go to the East for his own safety and to be interrogated further, and they fly to Berlin.

Back in London, George Smiley and another agent visit Liz. They ask her questions about her relationship with Leamas. Smiley leaves Liz his card and tells her to be in touch if she needs anything. Meanwhile, at a lodge outside Berlin, Leamas meets Fiedler , the second in command at the Abteilung and its best interrogator.

In planning to destroy Mundt, Control is counting on Fiedler to collect the evidence about Mundt once Leamas frames him and prosecute a case against his boss. Fiedler and Leamas spend days walking through the hills, during which Fiedler asks Leamas about the details of his service and about his philosophy.

Leamas steadfastly denies that he believes in anything. Fiedler is sure that Rolling Stone was meant to pay a spy working for the British in East Germany, but Leamas says that it would have been impossible for the British to run an agent there without his knowing. To try to determine which agent was paid through the Rolling Stone operation, Fiedler has Leamas write to the two banks to inquire about the accounts.

He gets word back that the money was withdrawn from the bank in Copenhagen on days when Mundt traveled to that city. Back in England, Liz receives an invitation to travel to Leipzig on a cultural exchange with another branch of the Communist party.

She finds it odd that the Party would take special notice of someone as insignificant as her, but puts her doubts aside, hoping that the trip will take her mind off Leamas. Leamas and Fiedler return to the lodge, after a drive during which Fiedler tells Leamas that he suspects Mundt of being a British agent. When they arrive they are arrested. Leamas resists arrest and kills a German sentry before being knocked unconscious. He wakes up in a prison, badly beaten and tied up.

Mundt interrogates him, demanding to know the details of the British plot to frame him. Mundt says that Leamas could be shown mercy for murdering the sentry, if he testifies that Fiedler is part of a British plot to frame Mundt. Leamas does not confess. Mundt asks him over and over when the last time he saw George Smiley was, when suddenly a number of people rush into the room. Mundt is arrested and Leamas is brought to a hospital. When Leamas wakes up, Fiedler is standing at his bedside.

Fiedler tells him that he had already submitted a report on his suspicions about Mundt to the Praesidium legislative committee when Mundt had them arrested, and now there will be a Tribunal to determine if Mundt is a British spy. Leamas will have to testify. I can see why it's considered such a classic. When his latest book, A Legacy of Spies , was released and got positive reviews, I decided to go back and catch up on the George Smiley series.

Smiley plays a minor role in The Spy Who Came in from the Cold , but it doesn't matter What a marvelous spy thriller this is!

Smiley plays a minor role in The Spy Who Came in from the Cold , but it doesn't matter because Alec Leamas is such a compelling character.

We follow Leamas as he gets involved in a tangled revenge plot against a powerful East German agent. There are a lot of twists and turns, which I won't spoil. I had seen the movie version starring Richard Burton, but I enjoyed the book more because it got deeper into the mindset of Leamas.

Highly recommended for fans of spy novels. Favorite Quotes "He knew then what it was that Liz had given him; the thing that he would have to go back and find if ever he got home to England; it was the caring about little things — the faith in ordinary life; the simplicity that made you break up a bit of bread into a paper bag, walk down to the beach and throw it to the gulls.

It was this respect for triviality which he had never been allowed to possess; whether it was bread of the seagulls or love, whatever it was he would go back and find it. It so happens that they need him. They need him so that the great moronic mass that you admire can sleep soundly in their beds at night.

They need him for the safety of ordinary, crummy people like you and me. In itself, the practice of deception is not particularly exacting; it is a matter of experience, of professional expertise, it is a facility most of us can acquire. View 2 comments. Jun 23, Madeline rated it it was ok Shelves: If I'm being honest, I guess it deserves this ranking. The characters are compelling, the dialogue is good, there are no superfluous scenes, and the whole thing has a creepy and secretive atmosphere that's very compelling.

But I cannot in good conscience give this more than two stars, for the simple reason that, for the majority of the book, I never This is on the list of Books You Must Read Before You Die, which means we are to respect it as a Very Important Book and give it a good rating.

But I cannot in good conscience give this more than two stars, for the simple reason that, for the majority of the book, I never had any idea what was going on. The story, to give you some idea of what I mean, can be best summed up like this: Leamas is a British spy in the 50's dealing with the Soviets. He wants to retire from the service and grudgingly agrees to do one last job, even though he is Getting Too Old For This Shit.

His job: So there's a lot of secrecy going on, and the problem is that le Carre often doesn't bother to let the readers in on the secrets.

Also, the book is about Soviet Germany in the 50's, which put me at an immediate disadvantage. Look, I was born in - I just don't know that much about post-WWII Soviet politics, and they frankly don't interest me enough to do background research just so I can understand this story.

When I found myself trying to remember which side of the Berlin Wall was the Communist one, I knew I was out of my league.

This is a good story, the problem was that it just went over my head completely and I wasn't able to appreciate it as much as I should have. What do you think spies are: They're a squalid procession of vain fools, traitors too, yes; pansies, sadists and drunkards, people who play cowboys and Indians to brighten their rotten lives.

This is a war. It's graphic and unpleasant because it's fought on a tiny scale, at close range; fought with a wastage of innocent life sometimes, I admit.

But it's nothing, nothing at all beside other wars - the last or the next. View all 31 comments. Mar 16, Susan rated it it was amazing. Alec Leamas is the Head of the West Berlin office, who is recalled back to London after losing another agent. In order to bring Leamas to East German attention, the Circus sacks him and Leamas ends up working in a run-down library, where h Alec Leamas is the Head of the West Berlin office, who is recalled back to London after losing another agent.

In order to bring Leamas to East German attention, the Circus sacks him and Leamas ends up working in a run-down library, where he embarks on an affair with a young Party member, Liz Gold. What unfolds is a clever, convoluted plot, where nothing is as it seems. Slowly, the trap is set and we follow Leamas from London, back across the curtain into East Germany.

Although this is listed as one of the Smiley series, George Smiley appears only briefly in this novel. However, you are always aware of him in the background and of his relationship with Mundt, from the very first book. Leamas is an interesting character, while Liz adds the touch of innocence, in this world of espionage, which underlies the personal cost — not only to her, but to those who work in the murky work of spying.

Like all classics, this book works because you care about the characters and what happens to them. Le Carre captures perfectly a time, and a place, and inhabits that world with confidence. Aug 22, Jason Koivu rated it really liked it Shelves: These are great spy novels.

And these are quality books, period. The man can write. Plus, his experiences in intelligence work paid off HUGE. The intricacies of spy networks and secret government agencies are spread over these pages like caviar and go down like a perfectly aged wine. Shit damn, this is sweet stuff!

There are no car chases and inventive gadgetry. No femme fatales succumb to his heroes. Sure, love is involved, but it's generally more realistic. It's all more realistic, when it comes down to it. In The Spy Who Came In from the Cold a pissed off agent, who lost his network of spies to a crafty and conniving bastard of a super agent, is sent out into the field again as a plant to ferret out the bad guy.

The agent is a pawn without knowledge of the whole affair and he knows it. But hell, he's willing to do anything to get revenge. This emotional attachment to the job puts him at yet another disadvantage. But he's good, so he should be able to handle himself Read and find out! Coward-Mccann, Inc. Set during the political tensions of the Cold War, the revolutionary espionage novel portrays the intelligence services of both Eastern and Western nations as sacrificing morality in the name of national security.

An incredible tale of distrust, fear, courage, integrity, and the enduring nature of human love. Truly a Masterpiece. Feb 15, Nigeyb rated it it was amazing.

After the slightly anomalous second book ' A Murder of Quality ', which is a murder mystery set in a top English boys public school, I was pleased to be back in the more familiar world of Cold War spying and espionage.

Instead, it is Alec Leamas, an undercover British spy who takes centre stage, in this bleak tale of duplicity and manipulation. After the relative simplicity of the first two novels this is a more subtle, exciting and complex novel and, I imagine from film and TV adaptations , far more typical of what is to follow. It is magnificent. Beautifully and economically written, and dealing in politics, intrigue and what it is to be human.

A bold claim, but all life is here. Not a patch on the book and much more simplified, but interesting for anyone who has read the book.

Rereading: The Spy Who Came in from the Cold by John le Carré

And Richard Burton is always good value. Burned-out spies. Instead, Alec Leamas is a middle-aged alcoholic on the verge of retirement from the spy game; burned out, embittered, and about to be cashiered for a string of failures while running England's spy network in Cold War Berlin.

He's recruited for one final mission: His mission is almost derailed when he falls in love with a naive librarian who also happens to be a member of the Communist Party in England.

There's some action and danger, but only in a few quick, confusing encounters in the dark. The ending is a bitter and amoral one as Leamas discovers what he already knew, that there may be good guys and bad guys in the Cold War, but everyone is gray in the dark.

The Spy Who Came in From the Cold: Review

This was a great spy story. There are no gratuitous scenes catering to the men's magazine readership like with naked gypsy catfights and a lot less of the racist, sexist pandering; this is a much more intellectual story. The climax is a showdown between rival secret agents but not on a speeding train but in an East German secret trial where control over the outcome bounces back and forth like a ping-pong ball, carried entirely by characters delivering monologues.

View 1 comment. Thrillers come in different packages. Action thrillers are usually tricked out in bright colors with fancy bows and all manner of bedazzling allure.

Dressed in more somber packaging are the cerebral thrillers. This is one of the latter. I like both types, by the way. It's been a good 40 years since I first read this book. My copy is an old dog-eared paperback with 75 cents printed on the cover, published in I was just hoping the glue would hold together long enough to read again without th Thrillers come in different packages.

I was just hoping the glue would hold together long enough to read again without the pages disengaging from the spine. It did, and the story was just as compelling as ever.

As in life, the blurred lines between the good guys and the bad guys are apt to give one pause.

It's that good. A solid one-two punch in the gut. Top quality spy novel. Jul 28, Joshua Rigsby rated it really liked it Shelves: He ruminates on the dispensability of human life in the business of intelligence. Agents and desk analysts are cannon fodder in the sniping and political machinations of the higher ups. Real intelligence work has much less to do with honor and patriotism than practicality and appearances. The end always justifies the means and may very well have nothing to do with the national interest whatsoever.

The overwhelming majority of the work is dull and boring. No clever disguises, ingenious gadgets, or luscious trollops here.

Just people trying to justify their work, to understand their actions and orders in light of some kind of meaningful moral framework. Just like the rest of us.

Jul 24, Lewis Weinstein rated it it was amazing Shelves: I have now finished my re-read, and I'm not sure if I'm happy or not that I didn't remember the ending. It's a thrilling story. The way the story is presented Any writer can benefit by outlining the scenes.

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And of course there are the flawed characters, brilliant and stupid, compassionate and cold-hearted, none of them to be trusted, who populate all of le Carre's work. Cold Spy: Readers also enjoyed.

The Spy Who Came in From the Cold: Review

See also: Other books in the series. George Smiley 5 books. Quotes from The Spy Who Came But it's nothing, nothing at all besides other wars - the last or the next. That's impossible of course. We act it to one another, all this hardness; but we aren't like that really, I mean Welcome back. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. Close Reads - Uno The Spy Who Came In.

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