The Last Juror is a legal thriller novel by John Grisham, first published by Doubleday on Some references in the book are clearly hinting at things known to readers of A Time to Kill. For example, in most blacks in Ford County don' t. Start by marking “The Last Juror” as Want to Read: In , one of Mississippi s more colorful weekly newspapers, The Ford County Times, went bankrupt. Willie Traynor takes over the local newspaper in Clanton, Mississippi. medical-site.info - download The Last Juror: A Novel book online at best prices in India on medical-site.info Read The Last Juror: A Novel book reviews & author details and more.

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The Last Juror Book

medical-site.info - download The Last Juror book online at best prices in India on medical-site.info Read The Last Juror book reviews & author details and more at medical-site.info Grisham has spent the last few years stretching his creative muscles through a number of genres: his usual legal thrillers (The Summons. The Last Juror: A Novel [John Grisham] on medical-site.info Story time just got better with Prime Book Box, a subscription that delivers editorially hand-picked.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other: Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. In , one of Mississippi s more colorful weekly newspapers, The Ford County Times , went bankrupt. To the surprise and dismay of many, ownership was assumed by a year-old college dropout, named Willie Traynor. The future of the paper looked grim until a young mother was brutally raped and murdered by a member of the notorious Padgitt family.

I'll warn that it doesn't have quite as much "excitement" and "suspense" as you occasionally find in his courtroom thrillers.

The Last Juror by John Grisham

It's more laidbac One of my favorite books! It's more laidback than those, although there is some suspense and a touch of blood and gore. This story is about people. It's about a town that changes over time and the townsfolk who change with it - some with relish and some kicking and screaming. It's about Willie Trainer, the newspaper owner who comes to town, an outsider, downloads the newspaper, and over time gains the respect, loyalty and love of the town he serves.

The true beauty of this book, though, is the incredible way that Mr. Grisham introduces you to the characters and the townspeople. Each character in this book is a story finely woven. You learn about these people: The writing is masterful in the creation of characters that we care about, are interested in and who shape this story.

When I finished the story, I actually left the radio off for the rest of my ride home just so I could think about what a wonderful story it was and how much I enjoyed it. Following Grisham's other non-courtroom drama's, specifically A Painted House, I see his talent is truly in character development.

The Last Juror

But, while A Painted House was good, it wasn't like this story. This had a much more satisfying plot, filled with wonderful characters, and an end that was somewhat expected, but that provided an end to a tale and to an era. I recommend this story. The narration was wonderful. Don't go into it expecting the same old Grisham, though. Go into it expecting a good story about people who touch you. This review is in reference to the unabridged audio version and the narration was excellent on this version.

This is definitely a book for the commute. Sep 09, J rated it really liked it. This may be my favorite Grisham novel of all! The law provides a layer to the story -- as to criminal sentencing, parole, business transactions, elections, divorce, probate -- but I was surprised it was not the key framework.

Instead, this is the tale of a dying weekly newspaper and the brash young Northern-educated Memphis journalist who downloads it, turns it around, and during the process sinks roots into the tiny community of Clanton, Mississipi. At its core, it is the story of journalist Will Traynor whose name shifts to "Willie" in Clanton and his friendship with a dignified, spiritual black woman named Miss Callie who's an awesome cook and, therefore, not surprisingly obese, as well as a scrupulous recorder of typographical errors in Willie's paper, and a beloved icon to family and friends.

Willie crosses a huge racial divide to get to know her. Along the way, a brutal murder happens. Traynor covers the case. At trial, Miss Callie becomes the town's first black juror. Almost a decade later, someone with a grudge starts killing those jurors. Miss Callie is also the 'last juror," though not in the way you might expect.

Willie uses his newspaper to crusade -- aptly -- because it's the right thing to do. Also because he knows how to make it lucrative.

The book spans about nine years. Along the way Willie grows up. And makes a bundle. Grisham's sense of humor is evident throughout, even as the book tackles serious themes an including injustice, corruption and yellow journalism, as well as the cultures of small-town living, Southern-style church worship and Southern cooking. I've enjoyed many of Grisham's titles. But never have I felt his humor so keenly as here.

Nov 22, Joan rated it it was ok Shelves: I think this was the most overrated - over written- over plotted of any Grisham I have ever read. To be fair, I didn't read it in a book.

I listened to it on tape. I liked Willie Traynor, the protagonist and Narrator, who bought a small town weekly newspaper and became a 23 year old celebrity in the town. There was a murder, of course - a vionent murder. Danny Padgit, the murderer was not sentenced to death. So far so good - but the title is "The Last Juror" We expect that the jurors will die on I think this was the most overrated - over written- over plotted of any Grisham I have ever read. So far so good - but the title is "The Last Juror" We expect that the jurors will die one-by-one at the hands of this dreadful killer.

But before we get there, we take numerous side trips - it took me so long to finish it that I forget some of them. Most significant was the relationship he built with Miss Callie over lunch every Thursday. He wrote articles on her seven children who had all graduated from college with PhD's and were all professors.

Not too shabby for a black family in the 70's in Mississippi. He sidetracked to more than was necessary about racism in Mississippi in the 70's. He sidetracked about Viet Nam. Knowing the history of the Padgetts did nothing at all to further the plot. And in much the same way that Willie Traynor got tired of writing and sold the paper, I expect Grisham got tired of writing and before we got to the last juror, Miss Callie died.

End of story. Huge disappointment. Jul 16, Amanda rated it did not like it. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Wow, I am shocked at the amount of people who actually liked this book. Every two years or so I get the urge to read a Grisham novel in the hopes that it will be as good as his early work, but the last three books I've read have been a big disappointment The Last Juror, The Broker and The King of Torts It's fine if Grisham wants to write something different than a legal thriller, but I wish his publishers didn't advertise this book as if it was.

I really didn't want to read a book about small t Wow, I am shocked at the amount of people who actually liked this book. I really didn't want to read a book about small town southern life, especially a particularly boring southern town, but that is pretty much what this book is about.

I found the characters to be uninteresting, particularly the main character. I thought it absolutely ridiculous that he sold the paper at the end so he could stay in the town and basically do nothing. The part where he went around to all the various churches in the area did nothing for the plot and it didn't even change his character mentally or spiritually.

What was the point???? I thought maybe the Padgitt case was the case that got him disbarred He was disbarred for some other case that they barely mentioned.

You would have thought that would be big news in that town, but apparently not. In A Time to Kill he was portrayed as a brilliant legal mind, but in this book he was a stereotypical defense attorney that did not impress me with his legal skills. I thought the ending was ridiculous, both finding out who was killing the jurors and when Callie died I kept reading this book hoping that the end would be worth it, but now I wish I had just stopped reading after page View all 3 comments.

Jan 01, Sumit RK rated it it was ok. Set in 's Mississippi, half way through the book, it drifts into a commentary on elections,racial tension, segregation,parole system, churches and so on This time A young mother is raped and killed by a member of one of Ford County's most reclusive and mysterious families, Danny Paggitt is sentenced to life in prison, but before he is carted off to The State Pen, he threatens to kill every single mem 3.

This time A young mother is raped and killed by a member of one of Ford County's most reclusive and mysterious families, Danny Paggitt is sentenced to life in prison, but before he is carted off to The State Pen, he threatens to kill every single member of the jury… Will he follow through on his threats?

Grisham tries a lot of different story telling devices in this book, it's the first time I can remember him using a first person narrator.

We see Ford County, as well as the murder and trial, through the eyes of Willie Traynor, initially an outsider from Memphis, he downloads and edits the local paper, The Ford County Times. He also lets the reader know who the murderer is right away, something else I can't remember him doing before.

The story takes place over almost a decade in the s. The first half of the book is taken up by the trial, and the second half is pretty much just various characters anticipating what Danny might do if he ever gets out.

This creates a lot of space in between which could've been really boring. Fortunately, Grisham uses it to introduce us to the various characters who inhabit Ford County and really dig into their lives, as well as the issues they faced in a rapidly changing south. To me, it's this middle section that makes the book worth recommending. However, I was disappointed that the ending just didn't live up to the suspense and tension that he built steadily throughout the book I don't think I'm giving much away by saying that the twist in this one just struck me as lame and not very well fleshed out.

Apr 01, Ava rated it really liked it. This was the first John Grisham book that I ever read. A friend recommended Sycamore Row and sent me an e-book to read.

E-books are not my favorite format. I prefer paper. But I liked what I managed to read of the book. Here was an author who knew how to keep the reader's interest. My interest was piqued and I tried to look for the book in my library. As it turned out, the plot of the novel was i This was the first John Grisham book that I ever read.

As it turned out, the plot of the novel was indeed eyeball grabbing. Willie Traynor, a young college graduate, armed with a degree in Journalism, arrives in the fictional town of Clanton, Ford County, Mississippi, in s, to work for a newspaper that barely prints a thousand copies.

Soon after his arrival, the owner is served a bankruptcy notice. The paper is up for sale, dirt cheap. Traynor has a rich grandmother who is prevailed upon to invest in the paper, and Willie finds himself, at 23 years of age, owner of a small-town newspaper. He works himself to the bone trying to turn a losing proposition to a winning one.

He is unexpectedly handed a publicity bonanza when a young woman is found murdered in the outskirts of the town. Her murderer, Danny, nabbed almost immediately, is scion of the infamous Padgitt clan. A trial starts and the whole town suddenly sees the need to download Willie's newspaper.

He fills the paper with not always impartial, often opinionated news, but he makes it a selling proposition once more. In the process, he falls in love with the small town and its people, and he fights hard to maintain the integrity of the town. This novel is practically un-put-down-able.

I neglected my housework in a bid to turn the next page and find out what happened next. Like the hero of the novel, John Grisham also lived in deep south in a small town. He was a trial lawyer though, not a newspaperman. After working for years as a successful lawyer, John Grisham took to writing novels.

His career graph professional to author reminded me of another favorite author of mine, A. Cronin, who became a successful author after years of being a medical practitioner. It is not surprising that several of John Grisham's books have been turned into Hollywood films. His plots are imaginative and rich, his characters are dramatic and memorable and his story-telling is powerful and evocative. Und da mich die Ausgangsbasis des Romans interessierte, griff ich zu. War ein glatter Griff ins Klo, absolute Gutmenschenkacke mit katastrophalen Charakterbeschreibungen.

Apr 20, Alexis Polk rated it it was amazing. Touching, historical, justice, law.

The Last Juror

It was a great read and I loved every moment. I was hooked and had to keep going because I wanted to know the end of it all. You connect with the characters and feel like they are a part of you. Highly recommend! Mar 09, Dele Haynes rated it it was amazing. Once again I've found myself in Clanton Mississippi. A fictional town that John Grisham has written about in several books, including his first book, A Time to Kill. The Last Juror takes place in Clanton, Mississipi, during the 's.

Instead of Grisham's usual lawyer story, the main character is Willie Traynor, a reporter for the local newspaper. The Times is a typical weekly newspaper that reports all the goings on in the small southern town. From the local crime to high school sports to the o Once again I've found myself in Clanton Mississippi.

From the local crime to high school sports to the only time most people found their names in the paper Traynor saw the paper as just a job, something between college and the Pullitzer Prize. Yet, the former owner drove The Times into bankruptcy and Willie was able to download the paper for a song. A woman that Willie wants to write a human interest story about. She was the mother of 7 university professors with PhD's. These interviews took place on Callie's front porch during lunches of some of the best southern cooking Willie had ever tasted.

These lunches would continue for years, missing only several Thursdays and was the beginning of a strong friendship between Willie and Callie. Not long after Traynor's download of The Times, a vicious rape and murder was committed. It was the buzz of the town and helped to drive the circulation of The Times. After some debate over moving the trial to another jurisdiction, the trial stayed in Clanton.

Callie Ruffin found herself the last juror chosen for the trial, the first black person to sit on a jury in Ford County. The jury was able to find Danny Padggit guilty, but couldn't sentence him to death.

Willie Traynor built The Times into a very successful weekly paper. Then Padggit was released from prison and jurors began to be murdered. The whole town was on pins and needles. The remaining jurors were living under protection. Was Danny Padggit doing these murders, who else could it be?

Will Miss Callie be the next juror killed? The Last Juror is a wonder story about a small southern town and the people who live there. Nov 06, Matthew rated it really liked it Recommended to Matthew by: Matthew Baltz Mrs. Willie is a young journalist who has just got out of college with a friend that told him the big money is in weekly local newspapers. Fortunately, Willie has a rich grandmother who gives him the money to download one down Ford County, Mississippi.

Shortly Matthew Baltz Mrs. The only suspect is Danny Padgitt, a member of the infamous Padgitt family, a criminal family based right out of Ford County. Danny Padgitt is found guilty of the rape and murder, but somehow gets out of the death sentence.

Now the town is about to settle down, right? Shortly after Danny is sent to the state penitentiary, the dual school system of a white school and black school is terminated.

All the white citizens are up in arms, frantically trying to save money for an all-white private school. Not that it matters to Willie, he has other problems. A son of black woman, Miss Callie, he befriended wants to return and see his mother. Unfortunately, there are some complications.

The reason he was even ran out of town was because the wife of sergeant of the Highway Patrol cheated on her husband with him. Now the town has no more excitement for the newspaper to run. Willie decides he will visit every church in Ford County and write an article about it, and proceeds to do so. A few years later Willie learns that Danny Padgitt had gotten out of jail, and he is furious. Now, jury members are turning up dead, killed by a rifle shot. Willie is absolutely positive that Danny is the one killing the jury members, but a revelation from Miss Callie, who served on the jury, changes his mind.

He finds out that all the jury members that have been killed voted no on the death sentence for Danny Padgitt. Is it Danny, and he is just killing them for sending him to jail?

I think the theme of this novel was you have to do what you think is right even though it could be dangerous. This is exactly what Willie did by publishing stories about the trial that probably contributed somewhat to sending Danny Padgitt to prison. This was very dangerous because the Padgitt family had threatened him. This was a very good book, even though it was rather long and a little bit slow in some places.

The thing I liked most about this book was the ending, because you never expect it. Other than that I liked the fact that it had some reality to it. Yeah, this whole story together would probably never happen, but there are reporters today that are probably bribed or threatened to not write a story about something. The part I liked the least about the book was that it was a little tedious in some places. When it talked about renovating his house for example.

Page Count: The synopsis and title of this are really misleading. They promise a story about a town that when its local paper changes owners to a young outsider, the paper is almost doomed till a brutal murder happens and the paper is saved. Nine years later, the retribution begins. This has been on my shelf for almost 2 years now, nagging and intimidating me. I wa The synopsis and title of this are really misleading. Alas, I braced and picked it up.

The writing was good, the characters were great, the setting was interesting, yet it dragged. I was ready for a gruesome murder, a furious trial, a bloody retribution. I got all these in small bursts throughout the story. Because I was cheated. Look at that title and that cover! The Last Juror is my first Grisham novel, and it definitely won't be my last. I enjoyed reading this book, even though for the most part I felt like I was reading a different book from the one described by the back cover.

It advertised The Last Juror as a thriller, and so I expected more action, perhaps some exciting game of cat and mouse between our protagonist and the antagonist, but what I got is a character-centric book that has a water-downed version of the elements of a good element.

Tha The Last Juror is my first Grisham novel, and it definitely won't be my last. That's not so say I didn't like this book. In fact, I was hooked. I enjoyed the courtroom scenes and the behind-the-scene glimpses on the life of a journalist. Most of all, I loved the characters. Without them, this would have been a harder read for me. Sure, character development doesn't play a huge part in the story and most of the characters are rather flat, but they are good flat characters; I cared and felt for them.

Our narrator and protagonist, Willie Traynor, has a hilarious voice, and I admired his gutsiness to challenge the norms and willingness to report even the ugliest parts of a crime, even at the expense of his own life. I loved the Ruffin family, and their friendship with Willie was heartwarming. That's what the book is, really: It's not the thriller I was promised, but it's still pretty great, regardless. My greatest problem with this book is the ending; it was just too anticlimactic after all that buildup.

Linda, a reader who is from or love small towns in MS. This book reminded me of people in Key West where I lived for four years. Key West had the same kind of "small town" atmosphere like Ford County in this book, and its people were as colorful as people in this book.

Coincidentally, I worked at a small publisher in Key West, like the one in this book, so I enjoyed this book very much.

Rather, it is a book about people in Ford County, including a gruesome murder, its trial, and after-story, in s. Par This book reminded me of people in Key West where I lived for four years. Part 1 of this story is mainly developed around a murder and its trial, and then part 2 is more focused on people in Ford County in a wide range. Nevertheless, they find him guilty and he's sentenced to life imprisonment; but nine years later he's on parole and out for vengeance. To the surprise and dismay of many, ownership was assumed by a 23 year-old college dropout, named Willie Traynor.

The future of the paper looked grim until a young mother was brutally raped and murdered by a member of the notorious Padgitt family. Willie Traynor reported all the gruesome details, and his newspaper began to prosper. The murderer, Danny Padgitt, was tried before a packed courthouse in Clanton, Mississippi.

The trial came to a startling and dramatic end when the defendant threatened revenge against the jurors if they convicted him. Nevertheless, they found him guilty, and he was sentenced to life in prison. But in Mississippi in , "life" didn't necessarily mean "life," and nine years later Danny Padgitt managed to get himself paroled.

He returned to Ford County, and the retribution began. Chapter 2 Rhoda Kassellaw lived in the Beech Hill community, twelve miles north of Clanton, in a modest gray brick house on a narrow, paved country road. The flower beds along the front of the house were weedless and received daily care, and between them and the road the long wide lawn was thick and well cut.