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Editorial Reviews. medical-site.info Review. This startling look at desperate, drug- addled inner-city The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood - Kindle edition by David Simon, Edward Burns. $ eBook features. most of Baltimore. But this notorious corner's The Corner by David Simon and Edward Burns. Read an Excerpt. download download the Ebook: Kobo · Barnes &. Read "The Corner A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood" by David Simon available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off.

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The Corner David Simon Ebook

More vividly than any recent book, "The Corner" captures an America of which David Simon is the author of the bestselling "Homicide: A Year on the Killing. But this notorious corner's hour open-air drug market provides the David Simon, an award-winning author and crime reporter, and Edward Burns, a year. The crime-infested intersection of West Fayette and Monroe Streets is well-known --and cautiously avoided--by most of Baltimore. But this notorious corner's.

The Corner is very similar to Simon's other best selling book, Homicide: As a freelance writer he has been allowed access to the darkest and grittiest corners of West Few novels can boast the combination Simon and Burns achieve here: Armed with the tools of journalism and the humanity of The Corner: David Simon , Edward Burns. West Baltimore, Fayette and Monroe: On this forgotten intersection, the American dream has crumbled to a nightmare. Here, the full price of the drug culture is being paid — yet, surprisingly, it can also be a place of hope, caring, and love. This extraordinary book tells the searing true story of one year in the life of an inner-city neighborhood. Written by David Simon, the award-winning author of "Homicide, " and Edward Burns, a former police detective, it follows a handful of people who must struggle mightily just to survive — let alone escape — the drug market that fuels their world. At the center of the narrative is fifteen-year-old DeAndre McCullough. DeAndre's parents, Gary and Fran, were once poised, against all odds, to pull themselves up and out of West Baltimore.

For fans of The Wire you get to see in this book a lot of the inspiration for the addicts' side and to some extent the drug dealers side of the story. Jun 04, Diana rated it it was amazing Shelves: The interesting thing about The Corner is I used to pass this exact corner in the summers when I visited my Grandmother. I had no idea that that corner was a drug corner; I was so sheltered and naive back then.

I knew there were drug dealers and addicts, but they were everywhere it seemed and it became a staple in the backgrounds of my visits.

Interestingly enough, I learned to fear these addicts, walking past them with my cousin and seeing them high out their minds, I would just look at the gro The interesting thing about The Corner is I used to pass this exact corner in the summers when I visited my Grandmother.

Interestingly enough, I learned to fear these addicts, walking past them with my cousin and seeing them high out their minds, I would just look at the ground, embarrassed for them, wanting to erase their ugliness from my mind as soon as possible. I watch it and forget about it. I remember being transfixed on it but losing myself in the acting, never caring or connecting the fact that this was about real people. Fast forward to a few months ago, my husband and I watched the entire seasons of The Wire.

We loved it. We watched it with our adult eyes and I fell for Gary's wide eyed innocence and DeAndre's poetic toughness. I felt for Fran and was angered by her as well. After surfing the internet to see what they were all up to, I find that DeAndre has died from an overdose and my heart breaks all over again for this family.

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Almost everyone, except Tyreeka and Fran, is dead. Reading this book, I felt lost. I felt like the only thing that spared me from living this exact lifestyle that DeAndre and CMB and Tyreeka were forced to live was I was lucky enough to be born somewhere where open corners were virtually unheard of. You had to seek them out, they didn't seek you out. I grew up afraid of drugs, allowing afternoon specials to convince me that I was better than that, while these kids grew up around drugs.

DeAndre never really had a chance and that pisses me off. It makes me so angry that Fran spent so many years high and never took the time to really raise him, and neither did Gary, and then DeAndre falls right into their footsteps. I know we all make our own choices but honestly, what choices did he have? I am finished with the book but I feel like I will never truly be finished with any of them. I think they will remind me to stop being so judgmental.

To stop acting so self righteous. To remember that not everyone chooses this life, that they kids being born into it didn't ask for this. Rest IN Peace you guys I will never let myself forget your stories.

Mar 13, C. Fans of "The Wire", people interested in an honest, unflinching portrait of the drug world. Books don't get much more powerful or moving than this. The premise is simple--Baltimore Sun reporter Simon who's lately been earning acclaim as the driving force behind HBO's "The Wire" which takes place in the same area and Ed Burns spent a year living on or around one of the busiest drug markets in Baltimore and reports what he learned.

In doing so, he tells the stories of the people who inhabit this world: The stories are harrowing--from people who spend their days cashing in scrap metal for cash to get hooked up, to families sharing one small bedroom in a shooting gallery.

Pretty much everybody is hoping for a change in fortunes, but the book offers few happy endings. In spite of this, its a fascinating glimpse of a world where most of Simon's readers will never go. The narrative is occasionally broken up by Simon and Burns' musings about the war on drugs. No matter where you fall on the political spectrum, its hard to disagree with Simon's belief that the war has failed, at least in his little corner of the world.

There's a particularly powerful passage near the end where Simon flat out shatters the Horatio Alger myths that many middle-class suburbanites cling to, particularly the idea that should they find themselves in that situation, they'd simply apply a little Puritan gumption and work their way out their unfortunate circumstances.

In the end, he doesn't offer any solutions and precious little hope. Yet, the people who live there are more than mindless junkies. They're human, with hopes and dreams and stories to tell. Perhaps Simon's greatest achievement is the way in which he employs his sharp eye and powers of observation to paint a wholly three-dimensional and, given the circumstances, refreshingly non-judgmental picture of a community in deep decline. In the end, its an amazing powerful read, one that will leave readers deeply affected and likely having shed at least a couple of tears along the way.

View 1 comment. May 27, Stephen rated it it was amazing. I have the unique perspective of having lived on "The Corner" for a year, and in the neighborhood for two more. My review might be biased because I don't have the luxury of distancing myself from the characters or saying "such and such was probably embellished for dramatic flair. Burns and Simon stay with each character long enough to I have the unique perspective of having lived on "The Corner" for a year, and in the neighborhood for two more.

Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets - David Simon - Google книги

Burns and Simon stay with each character long enough to break through their one-dimensional exterior that makes it easy for us on the "outside" to dismiss. They paint a picture of injustice, ignorance, selfishness, selflessness, hopelessness, hopefulness, and finally - humanity.

Despite how raw, true, and honest this book is, don't expect it to offer a simple conclusion or resolution to chronic poverty and drug use. Expect to simply sit with each of these people and see their real humanity break through.

The easy labels we use to categorize good guys and bad guys melt away and we find ourselves confronted with stories that share similarities with our own. The drug dealer becomes a father. The drug fiend becomes a mother. The slut becomes a daughter. The criminal becomes a son. This corner doesn't have to be in Baltimore in the early 90s.

There's a corner in every city in every age. The drug of choice may change every once in a while; the welfare system may receive an overhaul every few years, but on the streets, in the houses, and on the corner sit our brothers and sisters in humanity. Human Beings. In Chapter 5 of Let Us Now Praise Famous Men , that chronicle of poverty in the Great Depression after a section on of the dejection of poverty, where the description transitions into a long string of punctuation marks.

The emotion and description have moved beyond words. The author pounds his fists on the typewriter and screams out of frustration. This is a real Social Document. It is a raw and honest look at the brutal decay and degradation of the inner city, the compounding of prejudice and bad In Chapter 5 of Let Us Now Praise Famous Men , that chronicle of poverty in the Great Depression after a section on of the dejection of poverty, where the description transitions into a long string of punctuation marks.

It is a raw and honest look at the brutal decay and degradation of the inner city, the compounding of prejudice and bad policy and ignorance over several decades, and the cruel economics of addiction and the drug trade, and those who profit from it, politicians, fiends, and slingers alike.

The war on drugs has become a war on the underclass itself. These are human beings. It's easy to forget that, to distort or glamorize or hate them, to imagine ourselves in 'their position', that we would 'rise up' from the ghettoes and they are lazy and indolent. But there are few ways out, and those who do are like escapees from prison.

Simon has no optimism or hope for this state. But he has shown us what is out there, and now we have no excuse for ignorance. What else is to be done? Aug 05, Max rated it it was amazing Shelves: The Corner documents the intractability of the inner city drug culture and the pervasive hopelessness that charts the destinies of its citizens.

Simon and Burns spend in a Baltimore neighborhood with an open drug market — the corner. The portrayals are heartfelt and heartbreaking. Drug infested communities are often approached as a problem but The Corner depicts them as a systemic self-rein The Corner documents the intractability of the inner city drug culture and the pervasive hopelessness that charts the destinies of its citizens. Drug infested communities are often approached as a problem but The Corner depicts them as a systemic self-reinforcing culture.

We might find a solution to a problem, but where do we begin to change a culture that readily sustains and replenishes itself.

Its victims often die in their teens or their twenties from drug related violence or drug induced illness. But they have already had children who are destined to take their place. Few escape the corner. Most are condemned to repeat the cycle. Simon and Burns have done an incredible job of bringing this bleak world to life for those of us who view it from afar through the media. Most of us in the suburbs and affluent sections of the city are just looking for ways to protect ourselves and our children.

Today while we lament the victims of ISIS, we mostly ignore the victims of the corner. Partly this may be because we consider drug addiction a choice, but the authors show that this choice is an illusion. Children are raised by children who are themselves already addicts. There is only one life they know and can fit into — life on the corner. The authors make clear those growing up in the thousands of corners throughout America are a human tragedy of grand proportions.

The war on drugs, drug enforcement agencies with huge budgets, mandatory sentences are not only doomed to fail, they undermine the police agencies they were designed to help.

This is because the real issue is the drug culture not the drug transaction. As the authors put it: Unfortunately, Simon and Burns offer no solutions of their own. Now 20 years later in Baltimore has flared into violence as racial bias and overly aggressive policing led to civil unrest. Yet while everyone wants fixes that will quell the protests, the deeper underlying issues of the corner at the heart of that Baltimore community seem to be forgotten. View all 5 comments.

A very heavy book--figuratively and literally. At over pages, I did have a little trouble with the length--I wasn't always compelled to pick it up and read more, given I was going to read about more hardship, disappointment, and misery.

However, I understand why the authors wanted to give a year-in-the-life of the people they wrote about--it gives a fuller spectrum of their day-to-day lives. For those of us outside "the corner" life, this book gives a lot of intimate and personal details abo A very heavy book--figuratively and literally. For those of us outside "the corner" life, this book gives a lot of intimate and personal details about the people who are in it, letting us see their inner turmoil and aspirations--or lack of aspirations.

For people who ask of the urban poor, "Why don't they try to get a better education? Why can't addicts go to rehab and get a better life? Why do these teenage girls have all these babies? Why can't law enforcement get rid of drugs in the neighborhood?

The authors don't have answers to them, but they humanize the people in the maelstrom. Mar 23, Mariel rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: I really could not stop living in it, or talking about it to anyone who would pretend to listen to me life before I wrote reviews on goodreads.

Their journalistic approach of living with their subjects in no way are the people within this account "subjects". I'm not good with word choices for a year and being able to not leave their own footprint in was fascinating to me, for one thing. Not that it isn't hard to read about it. Well, it's always hard, I can make myself sick thinking about something like prison and trying to think of anything that could possibly help I'm not that smart.

Probably no one is. Yet, they don't pretend that they are not there. Their prescence is noted in the prose in what I thought was a different idea in storytelling.

Not a documentary style, nor quite the omniprescent narrator either. It felt, to me, like they were the reader along with me finding it all so damned hard.

I can't think of another book that made me feel that way. The other book with a unique journalistic style that still felt oh so immediate to me was Nicolas Gage's Eleni , another favorite of mine.

I have the HBO tv movie version on dvd but have not yet seen it. The show employs a mockumentary style. I'm not keen on losing that special storytelling feel that their book had, to be honest. The background history of Baltimore and how the situation got to be that fucked up Yes, quite a lot to think about.

For example, this book supposes that the cheap price of cocaine was an extenuating circumstance in the rise of the drug problem in inner cities. That the families did not need the men as much who would and did already download heroin , and it was the cheap price of coke leading the women off the path as well was when the shit really hit the fan I'd never thought about it from that stand point.

Money, of course, is another as Lester says on The Wire , follow the money trail. Kids started running drugs because they wouldn't have to do life sentences. Kids running the drug business on a fast food business level.

Like Lord of the Flies for street violence, methinks. Kids raising kids and the kid breadwinners are dealers. When money moved out of the neighborhood I'm out of shitty metaphors [for now] , the strings keeping it together went out. It goes back further than that. The Corner works as a great history book too. Why which community moved there, jobs The personal lives and motivations are the same. Except they are flesh and blood and one can hope pray that every other day before isn't how it is always going to be.

The people are some I won't soon forget. Make no mistake, no matter at which lowest point they may be in, it is still always make it or break it time. The Corner ends on a lowest note. Tyreeka appeared as an employee of the community college that Stringer Bell attended for his business courses.

I'm impressed how Ed Burns keeps in contact. Wire fans also know that he still talked to people whom he put away in prison for twenty years. It is because he actually gives a damn about his subjects, something that won't surprise anyone who knows his work. It can go up and down again. Feeling why you really, really don't want it to is the point of reading a book like this one.

The stakes were there no matter how it goes down. The soul, the heart we're all going to die anyway so the ending can't be the point Gary's story is one of the most heartbreaking for me. That he had that mind and gave it all away to drugs. That he was aware of what he gave away and that wrong make it or break it choice happened repeatedly. There's an old man in my town who was not always retarded.

He became mentally challenged after an attack. He remembers what it was like from before. That's what they make me think of, when they continue to choose this amputated life and that goes for anything better they could be missing.

I so wish it would get spontaneous and end differently for him. I can't bear it for anyone. I know what they are missing. Dec 09, Julia rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: This is quite possibly one of the best books I've read!

Ed Burns and David Simon undertake a journalistic approach to the traditionally anthropological method of ethnography- the descriptive documentation of a living culture.

The result of over a year of living among and gaining the trust of individuals within the culture is an amazingly engrossing story of the year-in-the-life of the residents around an open-air drug market on Baltimore's west side. Focusing on a core of approximately 10 indivi This is quite possibly one of the best books I've read! Focusing on a core of approximately 10 individuals, including several family units, this book provides an honest and often painful insight into life in the inner-city ghetto.

Its characters cover a range of age and degree of drug-involvement, providing a broad perspective on addiction, hope, and choice. Their relationships to themselves and one another are portrayed in their own words and thoughts, providing an intimate portrait of a group of people often ignored or written off by mainstream culture.

Presented in the style of fiction, but altogether true, this book provides the chance for a broad audience to gain a better understanding of the living situation of the urban poor in this country. For city-dwellers, suburbanites, or rural residents, the Corner is an opportunity that should not be missed.

Mar 15, Michael Burnam-Fink rated it it was amazing Shelves: How can I describe The Corner? How can I do justice to this heartbreaking book? This non-fiction book is the truth behind the television, a revealing portrait of a broken family living at one of the worst drug corners in West Baltimore. Gary McCollough is a former businessman turned dopehound, a street philosopher who's basic decency and inability to hurt anyone else means that he's a perennial victim.

Fran, his ex-wife, has buried her own life in the needle. Their son, DeAndre, is fifteen, caught behind boyhood posing and the awful realities of life on the corner. Other characters round out the neighborhood.

Ella Thompson volunteers at the rec center, one of the last honest citizens left.

Fat Curt is an old soldier, his organs failing and limbs swollen, who has no where else to go. Blue runs a shooting gallery in the shell of his dead mother's house. In this year long story, Simon and Burns follow their subjects, painting revealing portraits of bare humanity under the twin weights of drugs and a society that has abandoned any sense of responsibility towards the ghettos.

The first rule of the corner is chasing the blast, that rush of pleasure from the the drug and relief from the snake of withdrawal symptoms, and a moment of blessed escape away from the grind of life. And life, life is absolutely grinding. It's an endless series of scams and being scammed to get money for the dope. It's getting beat on by other crews, by your friends and family, by the police.

It's overloaded systems of public services, education, justice, healthcare, that can barely manage to cart the bodies away, let alone help anyone. Simon and Burns are at their best when they're talking about hopelessness, and the things that lift their subject past it. Corner life is lived entirely in present tense. Even a plan as simple as "I'll download a loaf of bread to have toast tomorrow" is void in the face of junkie roommates. The effort required to get clean, a months long ordeal to get a rehab slot in the face of requests for documents, court dates, and the blast itself, is a fragile thread, let alone the effort of staying clean when drugs are easier to get than coffee.

The most tragic parts of the book concern DeAndre, a smart kid who's almost entirely given up on school, but doesn't have the brutality and fearlessness it takes to make it as a gangster.

At 15, DeAndre impregnates his 13 year old girlfriend Tyreeka. Neither of them are in any sense ready to be parents, but the baby provides a focus for a girl who's not sure that she matters to anyone, and a sense of immortality for boy who sees only a little bit of life ahead.

At times, Simon devolves into a general rant at the War on Drugs, and the false hope that 30 years of brutality can win against the corner, against the raw desire for oblivion in our midst. And now, 25 years on, the drug war is much the same.

With the Opioid Epidemic, the corner is now in white America too. As I hit 'save' on this review, President Trump plans to release a drug plan that includes death for drug dealers. Screw it. Down the flag. Let the dealers and the junkies hold a parade down the National Mall. Drugs won. War over.

Mar 27, Aaron Arnold rated it it was amazing Shelves: I had to wait a few days after finishing this book to write anything about it, because it didn't seem like any part of my reaction really did it justice, or would be worthy enough to record without cheapening the book. It's unquestionably one of the most powerful books I've read in a long time, and knowing that it's nonfiction - that all these people really did exist and really did do the things it describes - makes me pause.

Very few books make me think about my own relationship to the text to I had to wait a few days after finishing this book to write anything about it, because it didn't seem like any part of my reaction really did it justice, or would be worthy enough to record without cheapening the book. Very few books make me think about my own relationship to the text to the extent that The Corner did. Maybe it's because it's about real life, that Baltimore and so many other inner cities are really suffering in this way in my own country right now that makes it hit so much harder than, say, the equivalent suffering in a Zola novel.

While I think America is a great place to live and has towering advantages over many other countries in many things, I think its greatest failing, at heart, is a willingness to simply look the other way at real human suffering if caring about it would cost money. The quote from Kafka that opens up the book, which also later made an appearance in season 5 of Simon's TV series The Wire - "You can hold back from the suffering of the world. You have free permission to do so, and it is in accordance with your nature.

The Corner

But perhaps this very holding back is the one suffering you could have avoided. I'm not exactly sure what drives David Simon to delve so deeply into the lives of these people and all the others he's featured on his shows or in his books; he'd probably say that, contra the Kafka quote, holding back is the one thing he can't do.

He immersed himself in the lives of Ella, Fran, Gary, DeAndre, and the many other people with smaller roles for well over a year, connecting their joys and heartbreaks, their own pieces of the "suffering of the world", into an immensely affecting work for public consumption. If you've seen The Wire then all this will be very familiar, but it's worth looking at this material through a new medium, particularly because its diligent, searching explorations of the individual people's lives is much more focused on the ground-level day-to-day struggles to stay clean or get a new fix or get a job or keep a job than the panoramic sweep of the show.

I'm not sure which of the main characters has the most painful story, but each was gripping. Periodically Simon will interrupt the narrative to go into extended rants on how exactly we've gotten ourselves trapped in this endless drug war and cycle of poverty. This book was written in the early 90s before the decrease in crime rates, but his moving analyses of the vicious logic of drug use and drug crime remain perfectly relevant, especially in a city like Baltimore.

The real question for me is: I can continue not being a heroin addict, but I don't know what I can do about the nightmare vortex portrayed here. The corner has an internal logic all its own, and I'm not sure that there's much I can do about it other than to support the end of this pointless Reaganeering that has hollowed out our cities and ruined millions of lives.

Like Simon said through The Wire, you can't call it a war on drugs - wars end. The challenge that our society faces is how to admit defeat and begin the long, painful process of making sure that the kind of life pictured here becomes just fiction again. Any ideas? Apr 01, Melissa rated it liked it.

A bizarre redemption tale. The focus of the books is more on the drug users than the drug sellers, which makes sense as I'm sure there aren't too many dealers out there looking to be followed by a group of writers, one of whom is an ex-cop. There are also segments that give background to the elements of the corner - teen pregnancy, the brown paper bag, the prison system, the schools With The Corner David Simon and Ed Burns have produced a fine journalistic example of documenting a living culture - the drug trade in one small area of Baltimore in - in a descriptively interesting manner that sheds some light on the whys and hows of the situation.

As with Homicide you are immersed in the world of these people and you are horrified at the differences between you and them but at no point are they held up for ridicule; Simon and Burns are largely sympathetic in their honest With The Corner David Simon and Ed Burns have produced a fine journalistic example of documenting a living culture - the drug trade in one small area of Baltimore in - in a descriptively interesting manner that sheds some light on the whys and hows of the situation.

As with Homicide you are immersed in the world of these people and you are horrified at the differences between you and them but at no point are they held up for ridicule; Simon and Burns are largely sympathetic in their honest portrayal of this lifestyle as only writers who have lived amongst their subjects truly can be.

My only problem is with my expectations, due to its links with the second greatest TV show ever made I wanted a book from both sides of this struggle, cops and robbers so to speak, and I didn't get that. La Tribuna de Salamanca Aug 23, Rebecca McNutt rated it it was amazing Shelves: In-depth, intense and really gripping, The Corner brings its readers to the streets of Baltimore where crime and drugs wait in the shadows.

Feb 25, Flora rated it really liked it Shelves: A couple of thoughts on The Corner: I thought Simon and Burns did a great job telling these people's stories, and they did right by their subjects in staying in touch and following up for several years afterward. Like "The Wire," the pacing can be slow and maddeningly erratic. It took some time for me to care much about these characters. Also, it was neat to see how this book provided the seeds for some of the "Wire" characters. I know there must be a universality to the corner life, but it's not A couple of thoughts on The Corner: I know there must be a universality to the corner life, but it's not my life -- so for me it's, "Here's a bit of Bubbles," "Here's the name Freamon," "There's some Randy and Duke here," etc.

David Simon is an angry man. Sometimes his writing loses control when explaining the dysfunction. After two or three such passages, I started skipping them. I also assume here that given the barely bottled rage that sometimes shows up in David Simon's writing, this is the best his editor could negotiate. You lived in a gray area with that.

Everything we did was legal, but it was kind of how were they going to interpret it? So, naturally, since they had a democratic election and we all voted against it, they gave him the go-ahead. Members of the department playfully hazed him until he proved game for the task.

He gained enough insight into the minds of the squad members that some later acknowledged that he had accurately captured words and feelings they had never verbally expressed. The book, like the series on Williams, is peppered with scenes later extracted for The Wire. In it, Simon provides a penetrating portrait of how the detectives attempted to unravel murder cases and the humanistic toll it took on them. He was already grappling with the limits of how little one outside-the-box thinker could influence a lurching institution.

When you really needed something done, you had to just put your foot down on it. But he was tenacious as hell, a little bit gullible. Like that informant Bubbles that he had. He was about to start his new life as a middle school teacher when Simon proposed a collaboration. For weeks, Burns spent his days gaining the confidence of dealers and users, while Simon worked at the newspaper before taking a second leave. Every once in a while, they take the syringe off [from behind] their ear, get a little hit, put it back on, and it would be a conversation where you knew that these people were aware of what was going on and how they had been sucked into this trap.

He had to learn the appropriate jokes to laugh at, when to show concern, when to blend in, or when to pop up with a question. Homicide was heavily saturated with cop jargon—a red ball, a whodunit, dunkers. The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood was published in and introduced the reader to a new vocabulary, with words such as testers, the snake, and speedballs.

The piercing narrative focused on the McCullough family and their efforts to function as a unit even as they dealt with the toll drugs extracted from them. Gary McCullough, the father, had been a businessman who fell into the throes of addiction once his marriage to Fran Boyd crumbled. Boyd, also addicted to drugs at the time, still tried mapping a better life for her sons.

They included DeAndre McCullough, who, at the age of fifteen, had already begun peddling drugs. Some, including a few inside The Baltimore Sun, accused Simon of ennobling and romanticizing drug dealers and users. In truth, the book offered a voice to those who had been left behind as forgotten casualties of the war on drugs. Simon originally did not think much of the deal when the Baltimore-born director Barry Levinson bought the rights to Homicide and plotted to develop it into a TV show for NBC.

The experience left Simon unsated. Only half of what he and Mills had written, Simon estimated, prevailed in the final script. While Mills departed for Hollywood soon after, Simon returned to the newspaper, satisfied to spend the rest of his working days arguing with his feet up and bumming cigarettes off younger reporters. But the paper, his paper, started feeling more unfamiliar. It had been downloadd in by the Times Mirror Company.

downloadouts cut into the depth and experience of the newsroom. Simon felt that the new top editors placed an unwarranted emphasis on claiming journalism prizes rather than covering the mundane issues plaguing Baltimore. Simon accepted a downloadout, jumping full time to the staff of Homicide. It was Fontana who mentored Simon, telling him that a writer becomes a producer in order to protect his words. Some of the cast and crew dreaded whenever Simon arrived on set. They knew they would be pelted with questions, and they tried avoiding eye contact with him.

Still, television did not entirely appeal to Simon. He had left the newspaper but remained an arguer, one ready to rail against the status quo. The Washington Post tried hiring him, and he mulled over the offer. It was not until Fontana showed him something else that he had been working on, a pilot for a prison drama shot for HBO named Oz, that Simon visualized television as a worthwhile megaphone. Oz painted a grim world where the initial concerns would not consist of who won and who lost or cleanly separate the bad guys from the good guys.

Simon contemplated whether something like The Corner could be adapted for television. Through Fontana, he gained an audience with HBO. You have six hours. He floated the possibility of attaching David Mills. The name appealed to the executives but left no place for Burns. Instead, Simon asked Burns to begin outlining the fictionalized world.

They wanted me to do another script as if there was going to be seven episodes instead of the six, which was totally not going to happen. I was more than happy to go out because I liked the experience. I liked to do things like that. David waited until it was safe to go out. He took scripts from both on a cross-country plane ride.

Albrecht opened The Corner first.

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