The magic of reality ebook


 

Richard Dawkins, bestselling author and the world’s most celebrated evolutionary biologist, has spent his career elucidating the many wonders of science. Filled with clever thought experiments and jaw-dropping facts, The Magic of Reality explains a stunningly wide range of natural. Read "The Magic of Reality How We Know What's Really True" by Richard Dawkins available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first. Richard Dawkins, bestselling author and the world’s most celebrated evolutionary biologist, has spent his career elucidating the many wonders of science. Here, he takes a broader approach and uses his unrivaled explanatory powers to illuminate the ways in which the world really.

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The Magic Of Reality Ebook

eBook . But there is another kind of magic, and it lies in the exhilaration of discovering the real It is the magic of reality - science. Richard Dawkins, bestselling author and the world's most celebrated evolutionary biologist, has spent his career elucidating the many wonders of science. Here. The Magic of Reality, with its explanations of space, time, evolution and more, will reality, and showing that it has an awe-inspiring beauty and thrilling magic.

Here, he takes a broader approach and uses his unrivaled explanatory powers to illuminate the ways in which the world really works. Filled with clever thought experiments and jaw-dropping facts, The Magic of Reality explains a stunningly wide range of natural phenomena: How old is the universe? Why do the continents look like disconnected pieces of a jigsaw puzzle? What causes tsunamis? Why are there so many kinds of plants and animals? Who was the first man, or woman? Starting with the magical, mythical explanations for the wonders of nature, Dawkins reveals the exhilarating scientific truths behind these occurrences. This is a page-turning detective story that not only mines all the sciences for its clues but primes the reader to think like a scientist as well.

Why is there night and day, winter and summer?

Why do bad things happen? Are we alone? Throughout history people all over the world have invented stories to answer profound questions such as these. Have you heard the tale of how the sun hatched out of an emu's egg? Or what about the great catfish that carries the world on its back? Has anyone ever told you that earthquakes are caused by a sneezing giant?

These fantastical myths are fun - but what is the real answer to such questions? The Magic of Reality, with its explanations of space, time, evolution and more, will inspire and amaze readers of all ages - young adults, adults, children, octogenarians. Teaming up with the renowned illustrator Dave McKean, Richard Dawkins answers all these questions and many more. In stunning words and pictures this book presents the real story of the world around us, taking us on an enthralling journey through scientific reality, and showing that it has an awe-inspiring beauty and thrilling magic which far exceed those of the ancient myths.

Original Title. Goodreads Choice Award Nominee for Nonfiction Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Magic of Reality , please sign up.

The author makes a strong case questioning all established religions as myths. I agree with that position. However he never discusses if there is a god with nothing to do with religion. What was there in time and space before the big bang? We don't know. Isn't it possible God is the answer? Certainly we can't prove it one way or the other. Yet he and I believes in aliens. If I had to pick only one to be true: Tony Maggs There is no such thing as 'before the big bang'. The start of the universe was the start of time, time doesn't exist outside the universe.

Anything …more There is no such thing as 'before the big bang'. Anything outside the universe can have no effect on what is inside the universe. If some form of god exists outside the universe it doesn't matter because any being outside can have no effect on anything in the universe.

It really is a tough one to get your head around. As for aliens, that's more a question of probability than belief, given the number of worlds in the universe there is a very high probability some others contain intelligent life.

Conversely, we have studied quite a large chunk of the universe in great detail and found not one single piece of evidence for a god or gods. Hello friends sorry for asking this qeustion how can i downloud this book from this sit?

Tanzeel Cheema How to download books from this site. See all 3 questions about The Magic of Reality…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. The magic of reality: View 1 comment. View all 3 comments. View 2 comments. Mar 29, Bradley rated it really liked it Shelves: It's not like any of the science or reasoning in it is new or unusual, or that I haven't heard many similar reasonings here or there all the way from high school physics courses all the way to certain and strange movies I've enjoyed.

Why I do love this book is simple: It's a great primer. I think I would have loved reading this when I was 13 or It might have even sparked my interest in science even more than I had been sparked Science Fiction did a perfectly admirable job in that department, with Heinlein and Asimov as my tutors.

Even so, apart from the things I've heard about of Dawkins, this is relatively mild in the religion bashing. He uses logic and reasoning, postulating clearly and setting up the universe as it is, not as we wish it would be. He also makes sure that Occam's Razor is quite sharp. I certainly have no complaints about this book, assuming I wanted a basic primer, of course.

As for being an adult reading this?

The Magic of Reality

It's charming. It's somewhat magical in the sense that I draw a sense of wonder about the universe and our living within it. For that alone I would recommend it as a bit of light reading, assuming you're up to your science snuff. View all 34 comments. A surprising number of scientists feel that Richard Dawkins does the public understanding of science real harm through his belligerent attacks on religion, which turn off a good half of his potential audience, but no one can doubt that he has a talent for getting science, particularly biology, across to a general readership.

This is his first attempt at a children's book or rather a 'family' book as it is aimed at a wider readership and it has much to praise. The Magic of Reality is a solid fee A surprising number of scientists feel that Richard Dawkins does the public understanding of science real harm through his belligerent attacks on religion, which turn off a good half of his potential audience, but no one can doubt that he has a talent for getting science, particularly biology, across to a general readership.

The Magic of Reality is a solid feeling hardback, half way between an ordinary non-fiction book and a coffee table book in format. Every page is illustrated by Dave McKean, with a mix of full colour photographs and diagrams, and heavily stylised line drawings - these last were perhaps a little angular and abstract for the younger audience, but overall the illustration is a good balance of supporting the text without overwhelming the page.

The approach that Dawkins takes is an excellent one, picking up on ten key questions of science - 'What is reality? Who was the first person? Why are there so many different kinds of animals? What are things made of? Why do we have night and day, winter and summer? What is the sun? What is a rainbow? When and how did everything begin? Are we alone?

All this works superbly well. Although it seems slightly odd that biology comes before the more fundamental physics and cosmology chapters, the absolute gem of the book as you might expect is the way that Dawkins handles 'Who was the first person? I love the way he really pushes the paradox that every creature in every generation is the same species as the previous generation's photograph - yet over the millions of years we can see a progression from fish-like creature to modern human.

If ever there was a single bit of writing that could totally wipe out anyone's objections to evolution it's this chapter. I loved it. It will really challenge the readers to think and will open their eyes. However, it's important not to let the brilliance of much of the book hide a couple of significant flaws. In terms of science content, the huge disappointment is that Dawkins doesn't mention much modern physics.

Both quantum theory and relativity really don't get any coverage. Particle physics only gets a passing reference with a wimp-out about the author not really understanding quarks. This isn't good enough. Omitting quantum theory and relativity from physics is like missing evolution out of biology - it's that significant an omission.

The other problem I have is with the final two chapters. Because there aren't 10 questions, there are The remaining two are 'Why do bad things happen? I don't think this has a place in a science book, and it certainly shouldn't be given two chapters.

I think this will confuse and quite probably bore younger readers, as after all the other wonders, these two chapters are, frankly, lacking in scientific joy.

There is also one very dubious part. Dawkins suggests that readers use a method of assessing miracles that boils down to 'How do they stand up to common sense? For that matter, most probability runs counter to common sense. As Dawkins himself points out, common sense expects that after a row of throwing heads, a coin is more likely to throw tails - but common sense gets it wrong.

It seems highly spurious to use common sense as a scientific tool, when you've just shown it fails magnificently.

I still think this is a great book, and I suspect many young readers will simply not bother with the last couple of chapters. Covering all of science is tricky, but despite the failings in physics, the rest of the book is good enough to make this, without doubt, one of the best children's science books of Review originally posted on www.

Jul 13, Caroline rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Anyone whose knowledge of science is a bit shaky. I am still sizzling with delight over my latest Dawkins' read - having soaked up its information like a hungry sponge.

It leaves the reader totally awed and dazzled with the world. The birds plump with protons and neurons, atoms and molecules are singing louder than ever in the garden, and that amazingly mysterious and wonderful star that we call the sun, roaring away converting hydrogen to helium , shines even more brilliantly in the blue sky as we make a sedate path rou I am still sizzling with delight over my latest Dawkins' read - having soaked up its information like a hungry sponge.

The birds plump with protons and neurons, atoms and molecules are singing louder than ever in the garden, and that amazingly mysterious and wonderful star that we call the sun, roaring away converting hydrogen to helium , shines even more brilliantly in the blue sky as we make a sedate path round it's circumference, twirling round and round on our axis at a giddy rate of miles per hour.

Thank goodness for the stickiness of gravity, and Mother Earth's determination to keep us clasped to her bosom. At last, a book giving a fantastic overview of science that I can easily understand. I obviously have the science age of a 12 year old the age group that everyone says the book is geared towards Something is wrong in my lauding of this book though.

In fact a good fifth of the book is dedicated to the recounting of various myths from around the world — including what he considers the Christian myth - and at the end of every segment on myths Dawkins goes on to show how science is better.

The Magic of Reality: How We Know What's Really True

Much much better than myth. He just cannot live and let live. In fact I have changed my mind about what I said in the above paragraph I have since read the Wikipedia article on Creationism see the paragraphs headed "Creationism internationally".

But I still don't like a lot of his other criticisms and quips against religion. Taken from Richard Dawkins. Anyway, to get back to the science. This book is a. I learnt tons, and loved every minute of reading it. The chapters have headings which speak for themselves…and also illustrate well the age group Dawkins is appealing to. He does it all with words - but he is an incredibly brilliant writer, and it is utterly memorable and fascinating. Time and time again he wrote about things that I'd previously only half understood, and made them crystal clear.

I feel hugely grateful to him. Highly recommended. View all 35 comments. View all 5 comments. Sep 15, Emily rated it liked it. I'm a big fan of Dawkins ever since reading The Selfish Gene many many years ago. However, I was very disppointed in this book, which is so basic that it shouldn't contain surprises for anyone who graduated from high school.

There were no surprises and nothing really new - the most interesting part for me was how each chapter is introduced with an example of a myth that people have made up to explain some natural phenomenon, which the rest of the chapter then explains. I found the majority of it I'm a big fan of Dawkins ever since reading The Selfish Gene many many years ago.

I found the majority of it plodding, basic, and disappointing. There was nothing at all in the book's description on Audible that indicated this.

However, if that's the case then it's a good, clear, basic introduction for a kid around years old. On that basis I'll give it 3 stars. As an adult book, which was my expectation of it, it was very basic stuff and came across rather condescending quite a lot of the time. Marks against the publisher for not making the intended audience extremely clear in the summary.

Oct 12, Noah rated it liked it. I live in the United States in the 21st century. There is no greater danger to our species and our civilization right now than religious crazies. How can we ask our businesses to change the way they do business so as to prevent climate change if half of the country doesn't believe in scientific evidence?

The Magic of Reality | Book by Richard Dawkins | Official Publisher Page | Simon & Schuster

Or worse yet, if they expect a big bearded man to come down and bail us out if things get too bad? What about the people who believe that the world will end, in the next few years, with a war in I live in the United States in the 21st century. What about the people who believe that the world will end, in the next few years, with a war in the Middle East?

What if their faith leads them to believe we should go to war to make this come about?

Yes, these are scary people and there are a lot of them. I'd like to think that Mr. Dawkins had these people in mind when he wrote this book. It may be too late for the current generation who have turned their minds off and handed over their rational thought in exchange for "faith. From that perspective, this is an important and incredible book. It is a blow struck for logic over foolishness. But all the way through, I did find myself having mixed feelings.

I don't think Mr. Dawkins really understands the purpose of the old myths and legends. The distinction between fairy tales and mythology seems to be missing from his understanding. When the old stories about the "gods" and nature of reality were written, they were neither meant to be "just so stories" nor were all of them intended to take the place of science.

While he chooses to use the myths throughout his book to make his own book more entertaining, he clearly looks down on them and shows no consciousness that there is a deeper level of meaning to be found in mythology: I would suggest he sit down and re-read his Joseph Campbell. The mythological creation of the world, the end of the world, the nature of mythological reality was never meant to be science.

It was often meant to represent the internal journey of mankind. On page he writes, "We don't have to invent wildly implausible stories: And in the end that is more exciting than fantasy. Can't we mature to the point at which we are able to partake in scientific investigation on Mondays and mythological investigation on Wednesdays? Can't we be trusted to learn the difference and keep them apart? Science cannot help us with questions of existence.

It will never help us with "How ought I act?

There are snide remarks here and there aimed at Astrology, aliens, and such. He may be right about many of them, but the attacks lack any logical depth. Overall, I would certainly recommend this book to any and all children of the right reading level, but I would also want to talk to that child as they were reading it.

Maybe take them for a walk in the woods and teach them about talking to the trees. There certainly is more in the world we actually experience than is dreamnt of in Mr.

Dawkins' science. Dave McKean, as always, is a master. His artwork is well worth the price of the book all by itself. He gets 16 stars.

View all 6 comments. Aug 03, Imane rated it really liked it Shelves: Apr 16, Shaimaa Ali rated it really liked it. Ilustracije su pomaknute , zanimljive i dobro su uklopljene u knjigu. Uz 10 glavnih poglavlja: Tko je bio prva osoba? Jesmo li sami? Tu je i prvo poglavlje, kao svojevrsni uvod: Ako negdje zapnete - uzmite ovu knjigu!

Oct 30, Antonia rated it liked it Shelves: Great book: Kids are naturally curious and fascinated by how the world works. They're also susceptible to all kinds of nonsense, of course. This much-needed book fill s a gap between simplistic kids' books and adult science books. Also, we need books that help kids understand, not just the facts of the world, but how we know them and, more generally, how do we know whether something's true or not?

And I should think this book would b Great book: And I should think this book would be invaluable to parents, a good many of whom could probably not explain natural selection, DNA, plate tectonics, or probability. Where else could one find so much in one book? And the illustrations by Dave McKean are astonishing —though somewhat overwhelming. Sometimes too large and distracting.

I don't like the weirdly formatted titles with mixed, funky fonts in different colors and sizes within the same title, that is.