The art of nonconformity epub


 

If youve ever thought, There must be more to life than this, The Art of Non- Conformity is for you. Based on Chris Guillebeaus popular online manifesto A Brief. If you've ever thought, "There must be more to life than this," The Art of Non- Conformity is for medical-site.info on Chris Guillebeau's popular online manifesto A Brief. Unconventional Strategies for Life, Work, and Travel.

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The Art Of Nonconformity Epub

Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. The underlying message of Guillebeau's book, based on his popular blog, is that "You don't have to live your life the. Download The Art of Non-Conformity: Set Your Own Rules, Live the Life and Change the World ebook by Chris GuillebeauType: pdf, ePub. The Complete Guide to Getting What You Want [ebook] by Jenny Blake (epub/ mobi) Chris Guillebeau, Author of The Art of Non-Conformity.

Follow me on Twitter , Instagram , and Facebook. You can get it on whatever platform you prefer. Over the past eight nine ten! I've had a few people write in to ask me if I've stopped blogging. Nopeā€”but I'm sorry! It sure looks that way. I enjoyed his show whenever I saw clips of it in hotel lounges and airports around the world. One of the best things about having more than one source of income is that it provides security when something goes wrong.

I'm just not one for self-help literature but even with that in mind, this book ends up being more about how to do exactly what the author does. I didn't find a whole lot in here that was useful, in all honesty. It was very specific, tailored to his life.

The Art of Non-Conformity

Plus, the book was not well organized - it was all over the place. Also, this is just me, but I would like to see more thought about international development from someone who lived and worked as an "aid worker" in Africa for 4 years, but there is little thought there. Certainly, his audience isn't interested in international development, but in my opinion, it surprised me that after working in West Africa for 4 years he completely switched tracks and didn't think of working in the int'l development and non-profit field.

He talks about making the world a better place and giving back, but once again this starts to sound more like a self-absorbed tale than of one who truly understands the need to end poverty. Just my take Sloppy boilerplate, cliched idealist phrases with no practical or actionable advice. No, Chris, college is were you go to engage in intellectual conversations, where you learn to think critically and originally.

Kudos to you for skipping classes and 'lifehacking' your way through your degree. Perhaps your book would contain a well-structured and orig Such rubbish. Perhaps your book would contain a well-structured and original thought had you spent your time going to class.

The mission is to support a full-scale revolution with a simple underlying message: For the first forty odd years of my life I lived in fear. Fear of standing out, not being liked, not being normal, not being good enough?

What a load of crap. I actually have had moments of fearlessness and adventure but sadly, many more moments of conformity. Looking back, I see my spirit aching to break out and succeeding for short periods, only to be sucked back into the morass of a conventional life.

In the latter parts of the book, the author asks you to think about what kind of legacy you want to leave and to start living immediately with that vision in mind.

I used to be the kind of person who wished for some divine inspiration to strike me about the purpose of my life. Recently, I asked myself a series of questions that led to the crafting of my own vision and purpose. Since that moment, my vision has been driving every purposeful and conscious action. You will inspire yourself! There is a chapter about setting goals in order to create a flexible but purposeful environment for yourself.

He provides a series of simple but useful questions to ask, which will help define what you might like to do. At the end of each chapter, there is a short, point-form summary of the main points. The writing is clear and formatted in bite sized chunks.

This is very easy reading. Other experiences have been explored and become more dominant in my life but I cannot deny that travel altered my world view in a way that nothing else has. View all 21 comments. Jan 05, David rated it did not like it Shelves: This is the worst book of its kind that I've ever read. It would take an entire book to say just how bad this book is. A few of his pieces of advice include "succeed at self-employment by any means necessary," which basically means do whatever to whoever, but don't ever work for The Man because he's an evil soul-sucking creep.

Uh, really? I paid money for you to tell me that?

The Art of Non-Conformity: Set Your Own Rules pdf epub

Another gem is to do like he did, drop out of high school, have a high IQ, cheat your way through a college degree, and a This is the worst book of its kind that I've ever read. Another gem is to do like he did, drop out of high school, have a high IQ, cheat your way through a college degree, and avoid graduate school, unless you can get over on that scam too.

He says college is worthless because he never got anything out of it. The way he did college, I'm not surprised.

The Art of Non-Conformity

Most of us go there to learn stuff, rather than get over until we've got our sheep skin on the wall. Maybe I'm a little idealistic there--but that's why I went. And lastly, he tells us he's an authority on self employment, and how to juggle several projects at once. His credentials? Well, once he almost lost 20K of sales because one of his suppliers went out of business.

Chump change for most businesses, and this guy thinks that because he fixed his 20 K problem, this makes him some kind of guru. Don't waste your time on this book.

I bought this book for the library and it was promptly checked out by one of my heavy readers. She started to read the book and before she was even through the introduction she was writing quotes from the book on her hand.

She was kind enough to leave the book with me for a bit and I burned through the book in short order. I too found myself taking down quote after quote from the book mine going into my notebook. It was a book that both described his journey and gave inspiration and practical a I bought this book for the library and it was promptly checked out by one of my heavy readers. It was a book that both described his journey and gave inspiration and practical advice on blazing your own trail.

Feb 10, Ziba rated it really liked it. For anyone and everyone; though not for the conformists. Actually yeah, even for the conformists. A person can change, right? Full of great travel hack tips and insights into Chris's adventures. Round-the-world travel aficionado and blogger Chris Guillebeau has written a book that condenses a lot of the ideas presented on his blog.

Though I received a free copy of the book Thank you, Chris , I have mixed feelings about it. If you're familiar with Chris's website and message of unconventional living live the life you want, not the one you feel you're supposed to, and don't be afraid to pursue it in unconventional ways , I'd skip the first chapter.

It was a turn-off for me for 3 reasons: The parables he used didn't quite fit the situations he applied them to in my opinion, so they got on my nerves. He wrote that he "doesn't want to waste anyone's time" which immediately made me think, "Get on with it! A more detailed table of contents would accomplish the same task.

In line with that, he aggressively discourages people not open to the idea of unconventional living from reading the book. I understand niche marketing, the idea of velvet ropes to encourage your "right people" those into your idea to stay while encouraging those who aren't to move on to something they are into. However, I don't think that applies to books.

Not in the same way it does to websites at any rate. The book itself is the red velvet rope, its cover will either lure people in or turn them away. There's no need to turn anyone away with your words. If you really want to spread an idea, you don't discourage anyone from coming into contact with it.

They may disagree in the end or give you a bad review, but how else can you plant seeds of ideas or raise ideas for discussion? There's a saying I see most every day: Am I simply the wrong audience then? I don't think so since I've been following his blog for quite some time with interest. The college versus blogging chapter also killed me even though I agree with a number of things he said. It's true that a college education isn't necessary to perform a lot of jobs, but having a degree will make it easier to get most jobs and tends to yield larger paychecks over your lifetime.

So unless you're sure you're going to be self-employed your whole life, keep that in mind. Also remember that Chris has those pieces of paper if he ever needs them. More importantly, college is about learning critical thinking. You can learn a lot on your own but it's also very useful to get feedback. I'm all for lifelong learning, but his suggested program is in no way a grad program. Grad school is for learning specialized knowledge.

Go to iTunes U and look through the free course offerings there or read up on your topic of interest with books from the library. Another benefit of college is networking. If you expect career help, research that aspect before picking a school. I received fellowships from my undergrad school which helped me pay for grad school where I met a network of people I worked with after graduation. A lot of it is using the resources available.

Like most things, I believe that what you get out of something is related to what you put into it. Maybe he took the wrong classes or didn't go to a challenging enough school or just wasn't into it.

You don't have to have a degree to succeed, but be aware that not having one can present you with a lot more hoops to traverse in traditional work realms. If you're great at networking, rock on, you can probably talk your way into the opportunities you want.

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Just don't be that person who is insecure because you didn't go to college. I know too many lovely, smart people who have hangups because of that. My favorite chapter was number 9: Radical Exclusion and the Quest for Abundance. The most useful thing I took from the book is the idea of a to-not-do list, a way to minimize time sucks that are unhelpful or even toxic to you. He also talks some about his travel hacking in the book which I enjoyed. I wanted to know more about his relationship with his wife though.

I understand wanting to preserve her privacy, his too, but it seems a missed opportunity to talk about unconventional relationships and pursuing dreams when you have a partner who is not involved in them. From the blog, it doesn't seem like she travels with him to most of the countries he visits, so how does one maintain a relationship when one's dream keeps you apart?

What happens when ten to twenty thousand dollars a year goes to fulfilling one partner's goal without the participation of the other? How does one maintain balance and equity in the relationship? I suspect I will get the most practical use out of the resources that didn't actually make it into the book. I'm looking forward to checking those out. Thanks again for giving me the opportunity to read your provocative book, Chris.

May 17, Claire rated it it was ok. He spends quite a lot of time convincing the reader about the advantages of becoming an entrepreneur, talking about his own travels and shooting down any paltry excuses he has heard as to why this lifestyle cannot be lived.

The Art of Non-Conformity: Set Your Own Rules, Live the Life You Want, and Change the World

I agree with Guillebeau on many things. He raises excellent points about the value of money and how much of it you might really need. He makes several short and snappy lists to focus your thinking on your goal and how to get it.

He does not place a huge value on college. He puts focus on experiences rather than things. Personally, I gave up a very cushy job with a high salary and excellent prospects to move to another country and bum around a bit, spending very little money, running a small and fulfilling business and generally waiting around to see what life will throw at me next.

I like my life. He covers a lot of the same stuff but with lots more practical advice and a lot less showing off about how many countries he has visited. I disagree with him on savings and security, there is no way I would have given up my job if I did not have some investments to make me feel safe.

But then, not everyone is lucky enough to have been in my position before they have the realisation that sitting in an office, moving numbers around on a computer, with many people whom you would not choose to spend time with, is an insane way to spend such a large portion of your life. I read this as a sort of refresher on the philosophy in general, looking for a few new ideas, and to generally re-focus. It has done this for me, and I was able to skirt over quite a bit of it, because I have already got there on my own.

I find the tone a little patronising, with the assumption that the reader has never had any of these ideas themselves, let alone has acted on any of it. I think he is right on many issues, though, and if you have ever wondered if there's a little more to life than the nine-to-five then I recommend that you give this a read and then go away and have a very long think.

There are essentially two premises here 1 If you don't want a corporate career or work for other people, a college degree is mostly irrelevant this is largely true. Keep in mind that finding and keeping hardcore fans is incredibly hard and not easily reproducible!

It requires more sustained determination than most people can muster. Anyway, There are essentially two premises here 1 If you don't want a corporate career or work for other people, a college degree is mostly irrelevant this is largely true. Anyway, I'm not completely sure exactly how non-conformist these two ideas actually are.

It's called "being self-employed". If the plan had been to, say, reject a traditional career and continue selling coffee beans to a small army instead, it might not have sounded so "remarkable".

In that sense, the title has the problem of promising more than the content. View 2 comments. I didn't pay attention to Chris's books before as I read some of his blog posts and I didn't think they were good enough.

But I was surprised to see myself like this book of him. Choosing the life you want, being an autodidact, traveling around the world and similar ideas to live life to the fullest. Perhaps I'm living the same lifestyle, enjoying its high moments and bearing the critics. So I find the empathy. Chris, not a hat tip, but a handshake. Sep 11, Stephen rated it it was ok. Even at half-way through this one, I can tell that the author is spending more time doting on himself than providing useful advice to the reader.

I think part of the problem is that he doesn't have a very specific audience in mind. He includes a tangent about he dropped out of high school, took 40 college credits for a couple of semesters by over enrolling at multiple community colleges, and graduated early.

That feels like a representative example of his attempt at bravado, while not providing Even at half-way through this one, I can tell that the author is spending more time doting on himself than providing useful advice to the reader. That feels like a representative example of his attempt at bravado, while not providing anything particularly useful to the reader. His writing tone can be a useful kick in the pants to do something other than just go to work at watch TV, and he does provide some good, alternative ideas on how to live a more interesting life, but too much of the good stuff is buried among filler and what comes off as bragging.

Sep 08, Zora rated it did not like it. I'm sure many people will find this book inspiring, however I was not one of them. I really wanted to like the book but I found the author's concepts naive and cliched and I would consider him a person of weak character. He lost me when he quit his Fed Ex job because of a storm.

Seriously, is giving one or two week's notice really that horrible? To me, the author comes across as selfish, which is pretty much in line with his entire philosophy of doing whatever you want, whenever and wherever you I'm sure many people will find this book inspiring, however I was not one of them.

To me, the author comes across as selfish, which is pretty much in line with his entire philosophy of doing whatever you want, whenever and wherever you want. I feel like he strongly promotes volunteer and charity work because it makes him feel good about himself. I don't find his lifestyle particularly non-conforming. I travel the world and work from various locations on beaches too. And many in my business cohort do the same. His business prowess is embarrassing.

That's pocket change for many companies. I've fixed multi-million dollar problems but yet I feel like I still have much to learn when it comes to business. He lost me for good in Chapter 8 when he listed one of his principles as "Time is not money". Ephemeral nonsense and beyond naive. He can twist that saying around to mean whatever he wants, but at the end of the day, conformist or non-conformist, it doesn't make it correct. I'm really not sure why that was included as part of the title.

But in saying all that, this book might be useful for people that are determined to give up their day job and travel the world, even if only for a designated period of time, that need an extra boost of inspiration to make it happen. However, having already traveled the world, I will say that I have found the novelty of traveling and visiting exotic places and cultures does wear off.

Having a home and roots is actually really nice. But I totally understand the need to see and experience the world. Jan 13, Sarah Hubbell rated it liked it.

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Rambles of globe-trotting aside, The Art of Non-Conformity is a must-read for entrepreneurs, business owners, college students, and anyone willing to give unconventional living a chance.

Littered with famous quotations and personal anecdotes, the book covers everything from living remarkably to reclaiming work, but in an exceptionally tangible and relevant way. Whereas many business or psychology writers speak in terms of broad generalizations, Guillebeau gives practical steps to begin living the life you want, and while this is not a self help book, it will certainly help you to wake up.

Jan 31, Steven rated it it was ok. I read this book because Chris is a Portland blogger whose blog I've read in the past. Also, some bloggers I met are huge fans of his, bordering on acolytes. I've read enough books that are similar and didn't find anything new here.

The book seemed to lack a sense of rigor, as if the author was just talking off the top of his head. Interestingly, the people that are most inspired by Guillebeau are the ones that have started their own blogs with valueless drivel, thinking they deserve credit just I read this book because Chris is a Portland blogger whose blog I've read in the past.

Interestingly, the people that are most inspired by Guillebeau are the ones that have started their own blogs with valueless drivel, thinking they deserve credit just for showing up. While the underlying message is something that I agree with, the need to challenge yourself and focus on what's important unless this is the first book you've read on the topic, there isn't much here. Guillebeau's racking up Frequent Flyer Mile method is probably his most important contribution, and if you are interested in this, you'd be better off downloading one of his guides online.

Oct 28, Zora rated it it was ok. This book is an odd mishmash of New Age thinking, autobiography, classic quotes, and mediocre writing. In the style of the author that last phrase would be "and as I think about it, it seems to me, the writing in this book is what some would call not that great.

Another problem is this: I suspect you eith This book is an odd mishmash of New Age thinking, autobiography, classic quotes, and mediocre writing. I suspect you either are a nonconformist by nature, and possibly by genetics, or you are not.

And if you are not one, you are doomed to lead either a life of quiet desperation or life so boring that if you told me about it I would feel some quiet desperation. A how-to book on how to change your very nature really won't work. If you are marching to the beat of your own drummer, you probably don't read a lot of self-help books. Self-help by its very nature requires cultlike credulity. Cultists aren't iconoclasts.

However, that's not a problem with this book so much as a problem with the concept of books on this topic. This isn't what I had hoped for, though at least it's not one of those entrepreneurial books that suggests lying clickbait or exploitation of third world workers is the route to wealth which equals happiness. He seems a nice enough young man. Though I can guarantee that if he had taken his community college writing courses more seriously, he would write better than this.

May 23, Rob Warner rated it it was amazing. As someone who's adhered to rules for most of my life with a fervor rivaling Felix Unger's, I find someone who flouts the rules fascinating. While I find many of Guillebeau's choices too far out there, too impractical, or ridiculously absurd, my own choices haven't exactly dropped me in Xanadu.

I guess I'm in the self-examination phase of life, and I appreciate the questions and challenges that this book brings.

The crux of the book, as I read it, is to do everything on purpose, because you choos As someone who's adhered to rules for most of my life with a fervor rivaling Felix Unger's, I find someone who flouts the rules fascinating. The crux of the book, as I read it, is to do everything on purpose, because you choose to and it brings you happiness, not just because you believe it's what comes next in the sequence of life.

That's not as selfish as it sounds--helping others brings happiness, for example, and Guillebeau has spent years helping impoverished folks in Africa. The book isn't about pursuit of self-gratification; it's about choosing your own rules for life and not just settling on the paths dreams that others have outlined for centuries.

Sage advice, and I'll probably reread it soon. Feb 10, Lain rated it really liked it. I liked this book and I agree with many of the author's principles, but as a dedicated student I have to object to his classification of advanced education as being easily replicated by independent efforts.

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