Introduction to logic and critical thinking pdf

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PDF | The fact remains that clear thinking requires an effort and doesn't always come naturally. But one can get better at it if one is willing to. Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking by Matthew J. Van Cleave is . text but have come across this textbook in PDF format, please do not hesitate to. Read this book. PDF .. This is a review of Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking, an open source book version by Matthew Van Cleave. The comparison.

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Introduction To Logic And Critical Thinking Pdf

Logic and Critical Thinking. Fall Course Description: Critical thinking is the study of reasoning and argumentation. It includes Other relevant readings will be posted in PDF Wednesday, 12 Sept – Course Introduction No Reading. 2. Notes on Logic and Critical Thinking. Clark Wolf. Iowa State University [email protected] medical-site.info Part I: Introduction to Arguments. “Logic gives great promise. Salmon, M. H. INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC AND. CRITICAL THINKING, 5th Edition. Thomson. Wadworth. Page 2. Page 3. Page 4. Page 5. Page 6. Page 7.

Learn more about reviews. The book covers the important elementary information, clearly discussing such things as the purpose and basic structure of an argument; the difference between an The book covers the important elementary information, clearly discussing such things as the purpose and basic structure of an argument; the difference between an argument and an explanation; validity; soundness; and the distinctions between an inductive and a deductive argument in accessible terms in the first chapter. It also does a good job introducing and discussing informal fallacies Chapter 4. The incorporation of opportunities to evaluate real-world arguments is also very effective.

My students have trouble understanding readings in the New York Times, so it is nice to see a logic and critical thinking text use real language that students can understand and follow without the constant need of a dictionary.

This textbook covers enough topics for a first-year course on logic and critical thinking. Chapter 1 covers the basics as in any standard textbook in this area. Chapter 2 covers propositional logic and categorical logic. In propositional logic, In propositional logic, this textbook does not cover suppositional arguments, such as conditional proof and reductio ad absurdum.

But other standard argument forms are covered. Chapter 3 covers inductive logic, and here this textbook introduces probability and its relationship with cognitive biases, which are rarely discussed in other textbooks.

Chapter 4 introduces common informal fallacies. The answers to all the exercises are given at the end. However, the last set of exercises is in Chapter 3, Section 5. There are no exercises in the rest of the chapter.

Chapter 4 has no exercises either. There is index, but no glossary. The textbook is fairly modular. For example, Chapter 3, together with a few sections from Chapter 1, can be used as a short introduction to inductive logic. This textbook is quite thorough--there are conversational explanations of argument structure and logic. I think students will be happy with the conversational style this author employs. Also, there are many examples and exercises using current Also, there are many examples and exercises using current events, funny scenarios, or other interesting ways to evaluate argument structure and validity.

Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking

The third section, which deals with logical fallacies, is very clear and comprehensive. My only critique of the material included in the book is that the middle section may be a bit dense and math-oriented for learners who appreciate the more informal, informative style of the first and third section.

Also, the book ends rather abruptly--it moves from a description of a logical fallacy to the answers for the exercises earlier in the text. The content is very reader-friendly, and the author writes with authority and clarity throughout the text.

There are a few surface-level typos Starbuck's instead of Starbucks, etc. None of these small errors detract from the quality of the content, though. One thing I really liked about this text was the author's wide variety of examples. To demonstrate different facets of logic, he used examples from current media, movies, literature, and many other concepts that students would recognize from their daily lives. The exercises in this text also included these types of pop-culture references, and I think students will enjoy the familiarity--as well as being able to see the logical structures behind these types of references.

I don't think the text will need to be updated to reflect new instances and occurrences; the author did a fine job at picking examples that are relatively timeless.

As far as the subject matter itself, I don't think it will become obsolete any time soon. The author writes in a very conversational, easy-to-read manner. The examples used are quite helpful.

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The third section on logical fallacies is quite easy to read, follow, and understand. A student in an argument writing class could benefit from this section of the book.

The middle section is less clear, though. A student learning about the basics of logic might have a hard time digesting all of the information contained in chapter two. This material might be better in two separate chapters. I think the author loses the balance of a conversational, helpful tone and focuses too heavily on equations. Terminology in this book is quite consistent--the key words are highlighted in bold. Chapters 1 and 3 follow a similar organizational pattern, but chapter 2 is where the material becomes more dense and equation-heavy.

I also would have liked a closing passage--something to indicate to the reader that we've reached the end of the chapter as well as the book. I liked the overall structure of this book.

If I'm teaching an argumentative writing class, I could easily point the students to the chapters where they can identify and practice identifying fallacies, for instance. The opening chapter is clear in defining the necessary terms, and it gives the students an understanding of the toolbox available to them in assessing and evaluating arguments.

Even though I found the middle section to be dense, smaller portions could be assigned.

Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking - Open Textbook Library

The author does a fine job connecting each defined term to the next. He provides examples of how each defined term works in a sentence or in an argument, and then he provides practice activities for students to try. The answers for each question are listed in the final pages of the book. The middle section feels like the heaviest part of the whole book--it would take the longest time for a student to digest if assigned the whole chapter.

Even though this middle section is a bit heavy, it does fit the overall structure and flow of the book. New material builds on previous chapters and sub-chapters. It ends abruptly--I didn't realize that it had ended, and all of a sudden I found myself in the answer section for those earlier exercises. The simple layout is quite helpful! There is nothing distracting, image-wise, in this text. The table of contents is clearly arranged, and each topic is easy to find.

Otherwise, it is free of distracting grammatical errors. This text is quite culturally relevant.

For instance, there is one example that mentions the rumors of Barack Obama's birthplace as somewhere other than the United States. This example is used to explain how to analyze an argument for validity.

The more "sensational" examples like the Obama one above are helpful in showing argument structure, and they can also help students see how rumors like this might gain traction--as well as help to show students how to debunk them with their newfound understanding of argument and logic. The writing style is excellent for the subject matter, especially in the third section explaining logical fallacies.

Thank you for the opportunity to read and review this text! This is a review of Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking, an open source book version 1. The comparison book used was Patrick J. Lori Watson is the second author on the 13th edition. Competing with Hurley is difficult with respect to comprehensiveness. A glossary was not included. Reviews of open source textbooks typically include criteria besides comprehensiveness.

Further criteria for open source books includes modularity and consistency of terminology.

Modularity is defined as including blocks of learning material that are easy to assign to students. The book covers the important elementary information, clearly discussing such things as the purpose and basic structure of an argument; the difference between an The book covers the important elementary information, clearly discussing such things as the purpose and basic structure of an argument; the difference between an argument and an explanation; validity; soundness; and the distinctions between an inductive and a deductive argument in accessible terms in the first chapter.

It also does a good job introducing and discussing informal fallacies Chapter 4.

The incorporation of opportunities to evaluate real-world arguments is also very effective. Chapter 2 also covers a number of formal methods of evaluating arguments, such as Venn Diagrams and Propositional logic and the four basic truth functional connectives, but to my mind, it is much more thorough in its treatment of Informal Logic and Critical Thinking skills, than it is of formal logic.

Accuracy rating: 4 Overall, Van Cleave's book is error-free and unbiased. The language used is accessible and engaging. There were no glaring inaccuracies that I was able to detect.

Although some examples use certain subjects like former President Obama, it does so in a useful manner that inspires the use of critical thinking skills. There are an abundance of examples that inspire students to look at issues from many different political viewpoints, challenging students to practice evaluating arguments, and identifying fallacies.

Many of these exercises encourage students to critique issues, and recognize their own inherent reader-biases and challenge their own beliefs--hallmarks of critical thinking.