Henry viii and his six wives book


 

To ask other readers questions about The Six Wives of Henry VIII, please sign up. end. before reading this book, what i knew about henry VIII came mostly from clear when Weir describes the way Henry felt about Anne of Cleves, his wife. Start by marking “Henry VIII and His Six Wives” as Want to Read: Janet Hardy-Gould is a published author of children's books. Published credits of Janet Hardy-Gould include King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table (Oxford Bookworms Starters), Henry VIII and His Six Wives. Henry VIII and his Six Wives is available on audio CD ISBN Printed in Hong books and bring them back to my house. Margaret, my new.

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Henry Viii And His Six Wives Book

Editorial Reviews. From School Library Journal. YA-- A wonderfully detailed, extensively Add Audible book to your download for just $ Deliver to . factual version of the tempestuous private and public lives of Henry VIII and his six wives. The Six Wives of Henry VIII [Alison Weir] on medical-site.info Story time just got better with Prime Book Box, a subscription that delivers editorially hand-picked children's Henry VIII: The King and His Court by Alison Weir Paperback $ Preview this book» Never a wife more agreeable to his heart Her other books include The Six Wives of Henry VIII; Children of England;.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other: Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. There were six of them - three Katherines, two Annes, and a Jane. One of them was the King's wife for twenty-four years, another for only a year and a half. One died, two were divorced, and two were beheaded.

There they grew to maturity and were educated among the arched courtyards and splashing fountains where once the caliphs had kept their harem.

The Christian princesses rarely left their sunny home, except for the great occasions of state at which their presence was required. Before her eyes was the image of her pious mother as the supreme example of Christian queenship, an example that Katherine would try to emulate all her life. Ferdinand and Isabella arranged advantageous marriages for all their children, although none turned out as successfully as they had hoped. Isabella was married in to the Infante Alfonso of Portugal.

Although it was an arranged marriage, the young couple quickly fell in love, but their happiness was shattered when, only seven months later, Alfonso was killed after a fall from his horse. In , Isabella died giving birth to a son, the Infante Miguel, who only lived two years. Juana, the second daughter of the sovereigns, was volatile and highly unstable, yet her parents arranged for her an even more glorious marriage.

Their fame had led many princes to seek alliance with them, one such being the Holy Roman Emperor, Maximilian I, Hapsburg ruler of vast territories, including Austria, parts of Germany, Burgundy and the Low Countries. He had two gifted children, Philip and Margaret, and Ferdinand and Isabella were happy to ally themselves with Maximilian by marriages between Philip and Juana and Margaret of Austria and the Infante John, the heir to Spain.

Juana and Philip were married in This provoked his wife to terrible rages, and her behaviour became a public scandal both in Flanders and Spain. Reports of it reached Queen Isabella, who was deeply troubled by them, yet powerless to do very much to alter the situation. Her brother John fared rather better in his marriage, which took place in He was a pleasant youth who excelled in all the knightly virtues and who had captured the hearts of his future subjects.

His constitution, however, was delicate, and Ferdinand and Isabella were concerned that his spirited and robust bride would wear him out. Their fears were well founded, too, for the Infante died only six months after his marriage, leaving Margaret of Austria pregnant with a child that was later stillborn.

This meant that the Infanta Isabella was now the heiress to the Spanish throne, and when she bore her son Miguel in , there were great celebrations, in spite of her death in childbirth, for Spain once more had a male heir.

Yet when Miguel succumbed to a childish illness in , the unstable Juana became heiress to the sovereigns, which was naturally a matter of concern to them, though at least she had a healthy son of her own.

Queen Isabella grieved deeply for the loss of her children and grandchildren, which made her remaining unmarried daughter, Katherine, seem all the more precious to her. In , when Katherine was seven years old, it had been decided that she would go to England in , when she was twelve. She could not remember a time when she had not been referred to as the Princess of Wales, and from the age of two she had been schooled for her destiny as Queen of England.

She had been brought up in the knowledge that one day she must leave Spain and her parents for ever, being told that such was the fate of all princesses like her. As she had been reared to absolute obedience to the will of her parents, she did not question this. In August , Katherine and Arthur were formally betrothed at the ancient palace of Woodstock in Oxfordshire, Dr de Puebla standing proxy for the bride.

Katherine did not go to England in ; the date of her arrival was postponed until September , when Prince Arthur would be fourteen and capable of consummating the marriage. They also suggested that Katherine accustom herself to drink wine, as the water of England was not drinkable.

However, considering the manners and way of life of the English, he thought it best if she did not come until she was of marriageable age. Ferdinand was in no hurry: the recent appearance of a new pretender to the English throne, Perkin Warbeck — an imposter — and the continued existence of the Earl of Warwick, who had a very good claim to it, had made him cautious, and if another, better match had presented itself for his daughter at that time he would have accepted it.

Again Dr de Puebla acted as proxy for the bride, and the Prince declared to him in a loud clear voice that he much rejoiced to contract the marriage because of his deep and sincere love for the Princess his wife, whom of course he had never seen. Such courtesies were the order of the day, however superficial. Let [it] be hastened, [that] the love conceived between us and the wished-for joys may reap their proper fruit.

Ferdinand now made it very clear to Henry VII that unless Warwick were eliminated Katherine would never set foot in England, and Henry, anxious to preserve at all costs his friendship with Spain and the benefits the marriage alliance would bring, acted at once. Warwick was arraigned on a charge of conspiring with the pretender Perkin Warbeck; the simple-minded youth, beguiled by an agent provocateur, pleaded guilty, but was sentenced to death for his co-operation and beheaded on Tower Hill in November There was also a trousseau to be assembled.

Katherine was to take with her many fine gowns of velvet and cloth of gold and silver, cut in the Spanish fashion, as well as undergarments edged with fine black-work lace, and hoods of velvet braided with gold, silver or pearls. Yet for all his failings, he loved his wife, and theirs was a dynamic and successful partnership.

The only glimpse we have of Katherine of Aragon during her childhood is at the tournament where she was presented to the English ambassadors.

Henry VIII and His Six Wives

After the conquest of Granada, the four infantas were sent there to live in the Moorish palace of the Alhambra. There they grew to maturity and were educated among the arched courtyards and splashing fountains where once the caliphs had kept their harem. The Christian princesses rarely left their sunny home, except for the great occasions of state at which their presence was required.

Before her eyes was the image of her pious mother as the supreme example of Christian queenship, an example that Katherine would try to emulate all her life. Ferdinand and Isabella arranged advantageous marriages for all their children, although none turned out as successfully as they had hoped.

Isabella was married in to the Infante Alfonso of Portugal. Although it was an arranged marriage, the young couple quickly fell in love, but their happiness was shattered when, only seven months later, Alfonso was killed after a fall from his horse.

In , Isabella died giving birth to a son, the Infante Miguel, who only lived two years. Juana, the second daughter of the sovereigns, was volatile and highly unstable, yet her parents arranged for her an even more glorious marriage. Their fame had led many princes to seek alliance with them, one such being the Holy Roman Emperor, Maximilian I, Hapsburg ruler of vast territories, including Austria, parts of Germany, Burgundy and the Low Countries.

He had two gifted children, Philip and Margaret, and Ferdinand and Isabella were happy to ally themselves with Maximilian by marriages between Philip and Juana and Margaret of Austria and the Infante John, the heir to Spain.

Juana and Philip were married in This provoked his wife to terrible rages, and her behaviour became a public scandal both in Flanders and Spain. Reports of it reached Queen Isabella, who was deeply troubled by them, yet powerless to do very much to alter the situation. Her brother John fared rather better in his marriage, which took place in He was a pleasant youth who excelled in all the knightly virtues and who had captured the hearts of his future subjects.

His constitution, however, was delicate, and Ferdinand and Isabella were concerned that his spirited and robust bride would wear him out. Their fears were well founded, too, for the Infante died only six months after his marriage, leaving Margaret of Austria pregnant with a child that was later stillborn.

This meant that the Infanta Isabella was now the heiress to the Spanish throne, and when she bore her son Miguel in , there were great celebrations, in spite of her death in childbirth, for Spain once more had a male heir. Yet when Miguel succumbed to a childish illness in , the unstable Juana became heiress to the sovereigns, which was naturally a matter of concern to them, though at least she had a healthy son of her own.

Queen Isabella grieved deeply for the loss of her children and grandchildren, which made her remaining unmarried daughter, Katherine, seem all the more precious to her. In , when Katherine was seven years old, it had been decided that she would go to England in , when she was twelve.

She could not remember a time when she had not been referred to as the Princess of Wales, and from the age of two she had been schooled for her destiny as Queen of England. She had been brought up in the knowledge that one day she must leave Spain and her parents for ever, being told that such was the fate of all princesses like her.

As she had been reared to absolute obedience to the will of her parents, she did not question this. In August , Katherine and Arthur were formally betrothed at the ancient palace of Woodstock in Oxfordshire, Dr de Puebla standing proxy for the bride. Katherine did not go to England in ; the date of her arrival was postponed until September , when Prince Arthur would be fourteen and capable of consummating the marriage. They also suggested that Katherine accustom herself to drink wine, as the water of England was not drinkable.

However, considering the manners and way of life of the English, he thought it best if she did not come until she was of marriageable age. Ferdinand was in no hurry: Again Dr de Puebla acted as proxy for the bride, and the Prince declared to him in a loud clear voice that he much rejoiced to contract the marriage because of his deep and sincere love for the Princess his wife, whom of course he had never seen.

The Six Wives of Henry VIII (book) - Wikipedia

Such courtesies were the order of the day, however superficial. Let [it] be hastened, [that] the love conceived between us and the wished-for joys may reap their proper fruit. Ferdinand now made it very clear to Henry VII that unless Warwick were eliminated Katherine would never set foot in England, and Henry, anxious to preserve at all costs his friendship with Spain and the benefits the marriage alliance would bring, acted at once.

Warwick was arraigned on a charge of conspiring with the pretender Perkin Warbeck; the simple-minded youth, beguiled by an agent provocateur, pleaded guilty, but was sentenced to death for his co-operation and beheaded on Tower Hill in November There was also a trousseau to be assembled.

Katherine was to take with her many fine gowns of velvet and cloth of gold and silver, cut in the Spanish fashion, as well as undergarments edged with fine black-work lace, and hoods of velvet braided with gold, silver or pearls. The latter she would need after her marriage, when convention required a wife to cover her hair; only on state occasions would she wear it loose.

Then there were night robes edged with lace for summer and fur for winter, cloth stockings and wooden stays, as well as the stiff Spanish farthingales that belled out the skirts of her gowns. Lastly, a reminder to the Princess of where her duty lay, the Queen packed a beautifully embroidered christening robe.

Jun 06, Beth rated it really liked it Shelves: To the extent possible, Weir focused on each woman's personality, her actions, and her own words, and as a result "Henry VIII's wives" became intriguing people in their own right.

If you're unfamiliar with the fates of Henry's wives, the following six paragraphs could be considered spoilers.

Katherine of Aragon: I have to admire how strongly she stuck to principle, despite her extremely powerful husband wanting to shuffle her off in favor of a sexier, potentially more fertile wife.

Anne Boleyn: Weir seems to believe--and as a result, I believe, too--that her death by execution was a result of a combination of Henry's wandering lusts and political expediency, and not any actual guilt on her part. This is not to say she was a nice person Jane Seymour: Who, himself, didn't live very long.

Anne of Cleves: Henry was not sexually attracted to her, and their marriage was quite brief and ended in annulment. Anne outlived Henry, and never remarried, and seems to have enjoyed life as a country noblewoman on the gifts of property Henry gave her on their separation.

Katherine Howard: She was too reckless about her indiscretions during a time when infidelity to the king was treason, punishable by death. Katherine Parr: There are hints that she might have eventually fallen victim to religion-based accusations that would result in a seventh wife for Henry, but he died before those went anywhere.

She married Jane Seymour's brother soon afterward, and died of puerperal fever. There's a lot of information presented along with the wives' stories, and much of it could easily and, I'm sure, does take up full books on its own. Court intrigue during Henry's reign, the changing religious landscape, Henry's many residences and the annual progress through the kingdom.

The high rate of infant and child mortality, and death due to childbirth. The horror of plague during a time that hygiene was very little known. The justice system being brutal and its decisions being as much about the whims of power as anything else. And so on. Simon Prebble's audio narration was excellent. It was always lively and engaging, and never showed itself off at the expense of the content. Weir's sympathy for these queens--even or especially the ones who have a bad name today in the popular consciousness--came across perfectly.

The only real setbacks to reading this book in audio are the lack of an index to keep track of the many individuals in the orbit of the Tudor court, and not having family trees readily available to figure out how any given royal was related to another. May 18, Duffy Pratt rated it really liked it Shelves: I really liked this, and especially liked the fairly even handed treatment Weir gave to these people.

But there is one notable exception. Compared with everyone else, Weir seemed to take delight in Thomas Cromwell's execution and even in the fact of the executioner botching the job and taking two swings of the axe to finally sever his neck. With others, Weir seems to see both sides of a person's character. But, for her, Cromwell was Henry's evil genius, and she seems to think ill of Cromwell eve I really liked this, and especially liked the fairly even handed treatment Weir gave to these people.

But, for her, Cromwell was Henry's evil genius, and she seems to think ill of Cromwell even while she is disposed to look favorably on his master. I found that a bit odd. The legal hoops that get jumped through are pretty amazing. Katherine married Henry's brother, but it got annulled with Papal dispensation on the grounds that the marriage was not consummated.

Henry then had his marriage to Katherine annulled because it was incestuous, based on the prior marriage to his brother. Lots of people think of Katherine as simply a victim in this. But it's pretty clear that she would have been pleased for her nephew to go to war with England to restore her marital rights. And its also clear that she insisted on her rights, even if upholding them insured that England would fall again into civil war as a result.

On top of that, she also seems to have had a soft spot in her heart for the burning of heretics. Anne Bolyn was probably a horrible woman. It's pretty clear that she was willing to poison her. But, its also abundantly clear that the charges against her were completely fabricated.

Henry needed an alliance with Spain at that point, so Anne was a political handicap. She hadn't given him a son, and was a pain in the ass, so she had to die.

And so did several totally innocent men, just to complete the tableau. This marriage got annulled on the grounds that it was incestuous -- since Henry had already had an affair with Anne's sister Mary before marrying him. You would think after the exact same problems with his first marriage, that Henry might have learned something Jane Seymour was the wife Henry liked best.

I think this is because, of all his wives, she had the good taste to die before he got bored with her. Katherine Howard is another great case. She probably cheated on Henry. However, its pretty clear that she was precontracted to marry Dereham, and thus her marriage to Henry was void, and she could not have committed adultery against Henry for the simple reason that they were not truly married.

It's also pretty clear that Henry understood this, but he was hurt and wanted her dead for it. And his handlers wanted her dead for fear that Henry would get over being hurt, and take her back.

She was too Catholic for them, so she had to die. Thus, they had to make her adultery a capital crime. Dereham also had to die. His crime was having sex with the future queen, before the King had even met her. This marriage never got annulled. And that makes sense, since it was the only one that had a legitimate basis for annulment. Of his other two wives: Anne of Cleves was fortunate. She repulsed Henry from the outset, and he put her away. Thus, he never got bored or disappointed with her.

And she seems to have lived a fairly good life. Katherine Parr escaped burning by very, very little. Basically, the courier who had the warrant for her arrest dropped it, and it was discovered by someone loyal to Katherine.

The Six Wives of Henry VIII

So she learned of her peril in time, and managed brilliantly to make amends. Otherwise, Henry would have succeeded in killing half his wives. Instead, Katherine Parr got to survive Henry and then die horribly from the complications of childbirth. As vile and fascinating as the characters in Henry's court were, the big impression I got from this book was how incredibly scary childbirth must have been in Tudor times.

It was incredibly common for the woman to die of complications afterward. It was even more common for the kids to die. And if the kids did manage to grow up, chances are they would die young from the plague or war or something equally terrible. But, of course, there was always the chance that they would grow up to be incredibly successful, at least until their rivals figured out some way to get them attainted and put their heads on the block.

If you have any interest in history and the Tudors then you need to download this book, it is fantastic. I was so impressed by the attention to detail, it gives you such a great understanding of Henry VIII and the Tudor court and of course his six wives. It is not like reading a text book, it is biographical and therefor very interesting. I borrowed it from the library and had it on audio, I started listening to it but switched over to reading it.

By the time I was half way through the book I had ord If you have any interest in history and the Tudors then you need to download this book, it is fantastic. By the time I was half way through the book I had ordered a copy of my own.

I was really impressed by the detail in this book, if the colour of the Queen's gown was recorded then those details where included. Henry VIII was a complex and highly intelligent man who controlled a nation with fear and suffering.

He changed a nations religious beliefs all for the love of a woman, a woman he came to hate and would not allow her name to be spoken. Katherine fell pregnant six to eight times but only had one child, Princess Mary. Anne Boleyn was six months pregnant with Elizabeth when she had her coronation. It is easy to see why so many historical authors have depicted Anne as the conniving husband stealer. She managed to hold off giving herself to the King of England when women usually fell at his feet including Anne's sister Mary.

He also says that she resented the loss of freedom she had suffered as a result of the King's courtship After Anne died the King was never heard to utter her name again.

Jane Seymour - Anne Boleyn waited seven years for her crown, Jane waited seven months.

On the day of Anne's execution Jane was preparing her wedding clothes. Jane Seymour's personal motto was 'bound to obey and serve'. Henry's wedding present to Jane was manors in 4 different countries as well as a number of forests and hunting chases.

Henry VIII & His Six Wives

The income from these properties were to support her. Did you know that Jane Seymour didn't have a coronation because Henry couldn't afford it? Henry's four other wives were Queen's without coronations. I will definitely read more from this author! Oct 20, Brittany B. So I am greatly peeved. Considering that this is my second time reading it, I can easily call this book a page-turner!!

It unfolds like a carefully-crafted novel; a fabulous retelling of the allegorical Bluebeard. As usual, this book demonstrates that Alison Weir is undoubtedly among the finest authors and historians of our day. All authors have some bias, I get that.

Weir may have even had proof of her assertions, but she did not present it that way. Instead, her words imply that the majority off Henry's actions were forced by Anne, and not of his own volition.

No doubt Anne influenced the king, especially in the beginning. But like Wolsey and Cromwell, Anne was the perfect scapegoat for Henry's bad behavior. He personally blamed everyone else but himself. I am surprised how much credit aka: Considering Anne could not rid her own household of Henry's mistress, I'd say the king had a mind of his own Jul 18, Kelly rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Another Alison Weir, another book I loved.

If you're looking to learn more about the Tudor period, this is a good way to do it. She presents the story of the wives in a pretty readable format, even for those who aren't usually into reading historical books for fun. Well researched, well put together, very informative.

And not at all a struggle to read! Aug 07, Nicole rated it really liked it Shelves: My respect for Anne of Cleves is strengthened. Nov 20, Corky Cobon rated it really liked it.

For anyone that loves biographies, this hits it on numerous levels. For lovers of history, this is a must read. Readers also enjoyed. About Alison Weir. Alison Weir. Librarian Note: There is more than one author in the GoodReads database with this name. Alison Weir is a British writer of history books for the general public, mostly in the form of biographies about British kings and queens, and of historical fiction.

Before becoming an author, Weir worked as a teacher of children with special needs.

Other books: DUNK AND EGG PDF

She received her formal training in history at teacher training Librarian Note: She received her formal training in history at teacher training college. She currently lives in Surrey, England, with her two children.

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