Dez. Popular Books, Darm mit Charme: Alles über ein unterschätztes Organ by Giulia Enders This is very good and becomes the main topic to read. charme do. Intestino_. -. Giulia. medical-site.info - giulia enders. Thu, 11 Oct 11 GMT giulia enders pdf -. Der Bestseller Darm mit. Giulia Enders Darm mit Charme Pdf epub MobiGiulia Enders Darm mit Charme epub pdf Mobi Free Download: Alles über ein unterschätztes Organ | Sprache.

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Darm Mit Charme Epub

The Role of the Gut Flora -- The Bad Guys -- Harmful Bacteria and Parasites -- Of Cleanliness and Good Bacteria. Other Titles: Darm mit Charme. Responsibility. and shifted more than. Darm mit Charme on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. ePub File Size: Mb. ISBN: You can read any ebooks you wanted like Darm Mit Charme Alles Uber Ein Unterschatztes Organ in easy step and you can download it now.

Uploader: Ms. Cristina Altenwerth In Enders account of the digestive system we darm mit charme that this is literally true. Bacteria co-exist with us making it possible to digest foods and extract the nutrition we need, even producing chemicals that we are incapable of manufacturing ourselves. Lack of certain bacteria or a rich enough variety of them increases our risk of autoimmune disorders, faecal transplants a powerful cure for certain diarrhoeas. The brain she mentions in passing by analogy to other creatures, is only useful for getting about from A to B.

In other words, it has it all. Highly recommended for anyone who wants to know a bit more about how their body works. View 2 comments. A charming book.

Which seems an odd thing to write about a book which touches on bad breathe and its causes, tonsil stones view spoiler [ these are the stinky white lumps that you might cough up from time to time hide spoiler ] , faeces, food intolerances, and vomiting horses, the poor things, can't vomit, while we can co-ordinate our intestines to do so , and don't she says, attempt to induce vomiting, your gut and brain can be relied upon to sort it all out by themselves, but there we are, th A charming book.

Which seems an odd thing to write about a book which touches on bad breathe and its causes, tonsil stones view spoiler [ these are the stinky white lumps that you might cough up from time to time hide spoiler ] , faeces, food intolerances, and vomiting horses, the poor things, can't vomit, while we can co-ordinate our intestines to do so , and don't she says, attempt to induce vomiting, your gut and brain can be relied upon to sort it all out by themselves, but there we are, this is a book that discusses such things, asserts the centrality of the gut and the role of the bacteria in it in our health and ill-health in an utterly charming way.

She is careful to note how many participants there have been on trials and if they were on humans or hamsters, and that while the Masai do consume certain bacteria and have very low cholesterol despite a diet of almost entirely meat and milk that they also walk for thirteen or so hours a day and fast for one month in every twelve.

In short despite the absence of footnotes she is both charming and careful. In Enders account of the digestive system we see that this is literally true.

Bacteria co-exist with us making it possible to digest foods and extract the nutrition we need, even producing chemicals that we are incapable of manufacturing ourselves.

Lack of certain bacteria or a rich enough variety of them increases our risk of autoimmune disorders, faecal transplants a powerful cure for certain diarrhoeas. The brain she mentions in passing by analogy to other creatures, is only useful for getting about from A to B. If you can become completely sedentary, you could do without it completely, the Gut, completely capable of running the show on its own, indeed she points out, it has a deep and not completely understood influence upon the brain.

If, she says, you you use a cloth to wipe your dishes and a towel to clean them you are finely and evenly coating your crockery and pots with a layer of bacteria view spoiler [ and if you use a machine you can be smug only if the wash cycle reaches a temperature great enough to pasteurise everything hide spoiler ].

At the same time she warns against using anti-bacterial products as these are indiscriminate and kill the good and useful - creating living space for the harmful and indestructible. This is though plainly a book that will be supplanted, or revised many, many times, as Enders tells us the study of the Bacteria in our gut is rather new, we know a fair deal about some of those involved in digesting milk but not much more, yet potentially it can provide insights in to the migration and settlement patterns and diet of ancient human populations as we inherit a health wodge of gut bacteria from our generous mothers and into weird areas - Toxoplasmata has an effect on risk taking in a study of 3, Czech army recruits tracked over a few years the presence of Toxoplasmata in the blood was the highest risk factor of likelihood of having an accident, so much for free will.

A very gentle introduction to the world within us from the teeth to the anus and the creatures that live in between, looking at the impressive physical structures that keep us moving and functioning. She's careful in her descriptions so you are not plunged into a stew of indigestible language and Latin terms.

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Also the friendly text is broken up by illustrations by the author's sister which also contributed to the charm of the book. View all 14 comments. Aug 01, Caro the Helmet Lady rated it liked it Shelves: I did enjoy scientific parts of this book, I found out some stuff I haven't heard before, but fart jokes and such became rather annoying at some point. I understand that the author was trying to keep it "light" so her readers wouldn't start yawning and dozing off on facts parts, but I think it would be better off without it Oh well, maybe I'm just not the target reader for this book.

In general - pretty good, informative and rather recommended, especially if you didn't know you shouldn't put I did enjoy scientific parts of this book, I found out some stuff I haven't heard before, but fart jokes and such became rather annoying at some point.

In general - pretty good, informative and rather recommended, especially if you didn't know you shouldn't put your fingers in your mouth after scratching your butthole. You're welcome!

View all 21 comments. View all 23 comments. Aug 10, Wanda rated it liked it Shelves: A pretty good section on our reliance on gut bacteria to mentor our immune system and help us to process our food. She explains very clearly why too much cleanliness is not necessarily a good thing. I was hoping for a more detailed discussion, but it occupied only a few sentences in the book. A good, basic explanation of how the digestive system works. View all 6 comments. May 18, Caroline rated it really liked it Shelves: This book gives us a warm and friendly journey through the gut.

Written in easy terms for the layman, and generously illustrated by the author's sister, this is a very accessible description of the journey of food through our bodies, and the critters it meets on the way down. Giulia Enders is a doctoral student, and she wrote the book in response to a friend wanting to know more about the gut. To do this she did a lot of research, as is shown in the bibliography at the end.

Regarding the bibliogr This book gives us a warm and friendly journey through the gut.

Improbable Research

Regarding the bibliography, she notes that the books and papers cited cover issues not found in standard medical textbooks. To be honest, I found some of her ideas a little wacky, or to put it another way, she gives equal weighting to all the ideas she puts forward. I felt that someone with more experience in the field might have been a bit more discriminating, or created more of a hierarchy of solutions. Enders sort of throws open the doors and leaves us to pick and choose.

I may be so wrong in saying the above. Her book has had fantastic reviews from most of the major newspapers - and I certainly learnt a lot from it. Plus I enjoyed reading it - and given the subject matter that is quite an achievement. One final whinge. There was no index. I think that was a real oversight.

I end with a sprinkling of notes - mostly taken directly from the book - purely for my own record. Haemorrhoids, digestive diseases like diverticulitis, and even constipation are common only in countries where people generally sit on some kind of chair to pass their stool. Of course this is not the only cause for these problems, but the difference in countries where they squat rather than sit is noticeable. Our position on Western toilets can be rectified especially when we are having problems , by A Inclining your upper body forward and B Placing your feet on a low footrest in front of the toilet.

This way all the angles will be correct. Teeth and jaws Tooth enamel is the hardest substance produced by the human body. And it needs to be, since our jaws can exert a pressure of up to 80 kilograms on each of our molars - or approximately the weight of a grown man.

When we encounter something hard in our food, we pound it with almost the equivalent force of an entire football team jumping up and down on it before we swallow it. Tonsils Before we reach the age of seven, our tonsils are still an important training camp for our immune cells. For reasons not yet understood, removing the tonsils of a child younger than seven can lead to an increased risk of obesity. Tonsils of children below this age should stay in, unless there is a very good reason for taking them out.

The removal of tonsils can improve things for people with psoriasis and it can also help certain people with rheumatic diseases.

It helps those people whose tonsiller crypts are shaped so they easily trap bacteria. Gluten sensitivity One person in a hundred has a genetic intolerance to gluten coeliac disease , but a considerably higher proportion suffer from gluten sensitivity.

The latter is not a sentence to a life of gluten avoidance. Those with this condition can eat wheat without risking serious damage to their small intestine, but they should enjoy wheat products in moderation. Many people notice their sensitivity when they swear off gluten for a week or two and see an improvement in their general well-being. Suddenly, their digestive problems or flatulence clear up, or they have fewer headaches or are less plagued by tiredness. Lactose intolerance Lactose intolerance is not an allergy or a real intolerance but a deficiency.

The body requires a digestive enzyme to break the chemical bond found in lactose. If the enzyme is missing, similar problems arise to those caused by gluten sensitivity, including belly ache, diarrhoea and flatulence. The older the person, the greater the probability that she will be unable to break down lactose. However, lactose intolerance does not mean you must cut out milk products altogether. So you can simply use trial and error to find out just how much your body can deal with, and how much dairy produce it takes to make the problems come back.

Fructose intolerance The most common food intolerance in Germany the author's country , is a problem with digesting the fruit sugar fructose. This can be the result of severe congenital inability to metabolise fruit sugar, but most people affected by fructose intolerance actually have a condition more accurately described as fructose malabsorption, and only experience problems when exposed to large amounts of the sugar.

When fructose is described on food packages as 'fruit sugar', consumers often assume it is a healthier, more 'natural' option. This explains why food manufacturers choose to sweeten their products with pure fructose, and consequently why our digestive systems are exposed to more of this type of sugar than ever before.

Furthermore, globalisation and air transport mean that many Western consumers are now exposed to a previously unheard-of overabundance of fruit. Fructose intolerance that appears later in life is thought to be caused by a reduced ability of the gut to absorb fruit sugars. The fructose intake of the average American is currently 80 grams a day. Our parents' generation took in only around 16 to 24 grams a day.

View all 30 comments. Sep 25, Heather K dentist in my spare time rated it liked it Shelves: I'm over the gut. That make sense, of course, seeing as I have a degree in a medical field, but I really can't get enough of learning about the human body. However, after listening to Mary Roach 's Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal , which I enjoyed very much, I thought I was ready for another round of intestinal delight.

I was partly right. What Mary Roach does is she breaks up a never-ending stream of facts into a story-line, of sorts.

That wasn't really done here. While I found the information interesting in Gut: Also, while the narrator of "Gut" was pretty good, she didn't hold a candle to the narrator of "Gulp. Time for me to move on to another body part. View all 7 comments. I absolutely loved this! I am pretty sure I have been raving about this book to my friends and family so much they could probably say they have read it as well haha I had to share everything I learned since it feels so crucial we all are informed about what goes on inside us.

Gut: The Inside Story of Our Body’s Most Underrated Organ

In the year or so I have had a fascination with my own gut, after my doctor surmised that my stomach problems were because I have IBS. Since then I have read countless articles and watched countless videos on the subject, in an attempt to help me manage my gut and its problems better. So naturally, when Gut by Giulia Enders was released, I had to get it and read up on the subject from a more scientific point of view.

This book was a truly fascinating read, and I learned a lot of things 3. This book was a truly fascinating read, and I learned a lot of things that I didn't know before. Unfortunately, I didn't have the foresight to keep a notebook and pen beside me while reading, because I would have liked to have had a list next to me that I could go back through again in more detail. However, some of the things I learned were why antibiotics are only a good thing in the most extreme cases, why not all creatures can vomit and why it's a good thing we can, how babies born naturally as opposed to with a caesarean section are better protected with bacteria in their early months, and how it's not actually probiotics that will do our guts the best but prebiotics.

There were definitely sections of this book that interested me more than others, such as sections on allergies and intolerances, vomiting despite my fear of the subject , and how the brain and the gut are a lot more linked than we might have previously thought. However, particularly with the latter section, I would have loved to have seen a bit more information as I felt they were way too short in comparison to other sections.

I also wish there had been more of a focus on issues such as IBS, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's Disease - although all three were mentioned, I was hoping for a bit more information on what causes them, and what can be done to manage their symptoms. I enjoyed Enders writing style for the most part - she manages to balance some of the more fact-heavy sections with light-hearted humour which was nice particularly for someone who is relatively new to popular science.

However, there were times where I found the constant jokes less funny - she uses a lot of metaphors throughout the book to illustrate her point, but they did seem at times more for comedic value than to help further clarify her points, and a lot of them I could have really done without.

I did however like the pictures that accompanied the text, drawn by her graphic designer sister Jill Enders, and they were actually very helpful at seeing certain elements of Enders text more clearly - for example, in how our food travels through our body. Overall this was a fun and very entertaining read, and I did learn a lot from it. Although there were things I would have changed and gone into more depth about, this is probably a really great starting point for science n00bs like me, who want to know more about our own body and its role in our everyday lives.

View 1 comment. Expect a lot of often fascinating talk about poo and farting, rather like a Monty Python sketch without the punchlines, as well as layman's introductions to the latest research into probiotics, prebiotics, antibiotics, the human biome, and the mysterious relationship between your gut and your brain. I learned a lot. I also made several strategic alterations to my diet, so it clearly connected on that level. The author, Giulia Enders, is still studying for her PhD, and the book came about after a TED-style talk she gave at a Science Slam event went viral in ; if you understand German, you can watch it here she's so young!

She writes about her subject with a smile on her face, fending off embarrassment with a no-nonsense, almost mumsy joviality, leavened with a few judicious euphemisms. It's all rendered into perfect colloquial English thanks to David Shaw's translation, which, at least in this edition, is refreshingly British in idiom. I'm not sure how it compares to Mary Roach's Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal , which I haven't read, but if you're interested in what you eat, how your body works, or just want to binge on some high-fibre factoids, Gut is a solid pop-science choice.

View all 27 comments. Neat little owner's manual for your digestive system, straightforward, humorous, and jargon-free. Complex ideas are presented as simply as possible, to reach as broad an audience as possible. It also included a lot of information I hadn't known, either because it was new, or because I hadn't been paying attention.

Ta, L. I'm not charmed. I found the writing childish with too many exclamation marks and didn't find things as funny as the author obviously did at times. I like the first pages the best because of the numerous new things I learned, but the for the rest of the book I mostly just wished it would be over already.

It's supposed to be fun and engaging and probably is to most people - to me it just fell a bit flat. I find it quite hard to know just what to say about this book. It is one of the most interesting books I've read in quite some time. It is also one of the most improbable page turners I've read. The illustrations are wonderful and quirky. It's a book about what happens in the passage between the mouth and the backside. At times maybe it is not for the faint-hearted.

You will learn quite a lot about your poo! However you will also learn a lot about your gut bacteria and their impact - frequently s I find it quite hard to know just what to say about this book.

However you will also learn a lot about your gut bacteria and their impact - frequently surprising - on your life. The E-mail Address es field is required. Please enter recipient e-mail address es. The E-mail Address es you entered is are not in a valid format.

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Giulia Enders Publisher: Greystone Books Ltd. English View all editions and formats Summary: Our gut is almost as important to us as our brain and yet we know very little about how it works.

The Inside Story is an entertaining, informative tour of the digestive system from the moment we raise a tasty morsel to our lips until the moment our body surrenders the remnants to the toilet bowl. No topic is too lowly for the author's wonder and admiration, from the careful choreography of breaking wind to the precise internal communication required for a cleansing vomit. Along the way, the author provides practical advice such as the best ways to sit on the toilet to have a comfortable bowel movement, how clean your kitchen should be for optimum gut health, and how different laxatives work.

She tells stories of gut bacteria that can lead to obesity, autoimmune diseases, or even suicide, and she discusses the benefits of dietary supplements such as probiotics. This book is a fascinating primer for anyone interested in how our ideas about the gut are changing in the light of cutting-edge scientific research.

In the words of the author, "We live in an era in which we are just beginning to understand just how complex the connections are between us, our food, our pets and the microscopic world in, on, and around us.

We are gradually decoding processes that we used to believe were part of our inescapable destiny. Show all links. Allow this favorite library to be seen by others Keep this favorite library private. Find a copy in the library Finding libraries that hold this item Electronic books Popular works Additional Physical Format: Print version: Enders, Giulia.

Document, Internet resource Document Type: Giulia Enders Find more information about: Giulia Enders. Reviews User-contributed reviews Add a review and share your thoughts with other readers. Be the first. Add a review and share your thoughts with other readers.

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